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Poplar as firewood?

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by peterc38, Oct 12, 2008.

  1. peterc38

    peterc38 AboristSite Guru

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    Hi,

    I have been lurking a couple months but this is my first post. I have a woodstove anb I was wondering if anyone has any experience burning poplar for firewood. I think technically the trees I am talking about are Aspen (quaking and big tooth) but everyone in here (Maine) seems to use the generic term of poplar.

    I have a fair amount on my land I could cut. I'd like to thin it out anyway to give some of the more valuable tree species (to me anyway) of oak and maple room to grow.

    I thought it might be ok for fires in spring/fall, especially since it is free.

    Any opinions?
     
  2. bore_pig

    bore_pig AboristSite Guru

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    My experience............

    It burns relatively hot, but super fast. Leaves a lot of ash. Good for early fall, late spring, and good for getting a fire started fast in the middle of winter! When it's free, Burn It! Splits easy too!
     
  3. Chuck Diesel

    Chuck Diesel ArboristSite Operative

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    It all burns:monkey:
     
  4. Rookie1

    Rookie1 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Not quite the same but I burn poplar 2x4s I get from factory down the street. Better than pine not as good as oak. As said if its free its good. And quit lurking it freaks people out. HeHe:laugh:
     
  5. myzamboni

    myzamboni ArboristSite Operative

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    I thought up your way Aspen was called Popple (different than poplar)
     
  6. Outdoorsman

    Outdoorsman ArboristSite Lurker

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    Here in Mi that (Popple) is the generic for a couple of the the lower BTU "hardwoods" such as Aspen & Poplar. Some would add Basswood & Cottonwood to that count as well. All are sort of gofer woods, put in a load and gofer more.

    Not really as bad as all that really, but you get the idea. Like already posted it makes very good starter fuel, dries down very fast compared to the denser hardwoods like Oak, Hickory, Osage ect. and is just fine in mild to moderate temps. Not a great choice though when the wind blows and temps are 15* or less. Unless you enjoy frequently reloading....then just gofer more...
     
  7. bore_pig

    bore_pig AboristSite Guru

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    Good call. I was describing Popple.
     
  8. rbtree

    rbtree Addicted to ArboristSite

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    The genus populus includes numerous cottonwood species, aspen, poplar--grey, silver, lombardy, etc.....all a soft wood that is light when dry, with low heat value. Liriodendron tulipefera wood is sold as "poplar" lumber. A misnomer....It is called poplar in the east, and tulip tree out west.

    Basswood is linden...a soft wood, but not called poplar...
     
  9. abohac

    abohac AboristSite Guru

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    Yes, the term "popple" is slang for poplar and in the country a person would almost look at you funny if you used the the term poplar (at least we would all know you haven't been in the woods much here in MI). Around here we use the term "cottonwood" even more than "popple" even though we are talking about the same thing. With all the crap said, yes I burn a ton of popple. Take care of it (split it and stack it and cover it if you can an let it cure for at least a year and you will have some pretty good stuff. I couldn't give it away around here so I sell hard wood for a good price and burn the stuff everyone thinks is junk.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2008
  10. Nailsbeats

    Nailsbeats Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I agree, cut it, split it, stack covered and burn it. Good in fall and spring, or if you're home all day and can keep stokin.
     
  11. AOD

    AOD Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I had cut up and split a big Poplar log for my grandmother last winter. I dont know where it came from, I think a neighbor dragged it in front of my other logs and left it. I split it small so she can handle it, she throws 15 chunks at a time into her Holland furnace and makes a roaring fire, once it goes out the house stays warm for hours, until the sun is up and it warms up outside. I told her to burn it up now and save the white oak for colder weather.
     
  12. reaperman

    reaperman AboristSite Guru

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    A few years back some wood peddlers, around here were selling popple trees
    under the term "Canadian birch". Only to benefit their pocketbooks.
     
  13. wdchuck

    wdchuck Addicted to ArboristSite

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    There's 4 cords all split/stacked/dried for this winter, so we can sell some cherry/hickory/oak if the opportunity presents itself.

    Sounds like your supply is easily available, can cut it on your terms, close to home....doesn't get much better than that, use it, it'll warm the stove.
     
  14. woodbooga

    woodbooga cords of mystic memory

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    I've burnt a fair amount of poplar and cottonwood. Almost weightless when dry. It's a good fuel for mid-day when the house gets a lot of passive solar heat. It's also good for baking in the oven since it burns hot and fast.

    Bottom line is: if it's free and easy, I'll snag it. But, if there's an ash log alongside a poplar, I'm going to take the ash first. (But you can't wait too long - the stuff rots real quick)

    I've heard it said that it was used as wedding presents for newlyweds in the interest of getting grandkids as soon as possible. The low btu content would force the young couple to come up with some alternate way of keeping warm. ;) :cheers:
     
  15. slofr8

    slofr8 ArboristSite Operative

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    I also have a lot of popple on my wood lot that I could (should) cut and sell but I'm not quite ready yet. So I cut what blows down for fire wood and love it. As mentioned it's easy to work up and is great for every thing except an over night burn. For that I have beech and maple.
    I'll split it and pile it in a spot so that the sun and wind do a good job of drying it. Some people wouldn't burn it if it was given to them. I can burn anything I want but make sure 1/3 of my years supply is popple.
    Dan.
     
  16. 3S Logger

    3S Logger ArboristSite Lurker

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    I burn Poplar because it is basically all there is in my neck of the woods.Bore Pigs description is of Poplar is right on the money.I wish there was some hardwood around here to harvest for those -30 and -40 degree days in the dead of winter we get here.
     
  17. wmflemingc

    wmflemingc New Member

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    Poplar wirewood

    Have been burning poplar with red oak. You have to keep your screen up when burning the poplar. It does diffenitly POP. Throws ambers out off a fireplace frequently.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2011
  18. Yoopermike

    Yoopermike AboristSite Guru

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    Not sure what part of MI your from but in my neck of the woods if you speak the word "cottonwood" yer gonna get some weird looks, or aspen for that matter. Its all Popple here!... maybe thats just us yoopers up here!
     
  19. Iska3

    Iska3 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    We call it daytime wood. Some of my friends burn it 24/7 in their bigger OWB. If it's free, it's in my stove... Easy to cut and easy to split. Hard to beat free heat by any name.
     
  20. mga

    mga Tree Freak

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    i thought a tulip tree and a poplar tree were two different trees, but belonging to the same family?

    even the leaves are shaped different.
     

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