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Can someone please explain this

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by Terrence Jefferson, May 24, 2019.

  1. Terrence Jefferson

    Terrence Jefferson ArboristSite Operative

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    I'm not exactly sure what this lever is on the handle of this saw. I'm just looking for someone who knows what it is to clue me in. Thanks a bunch. Screenshot_20190524-171619.png
     
  2. milkman

    milkman Addicted to ArboristSite

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  3. kz1000

    kz1000 fixumologist

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    Any chance you slide it over your wrist to one hand the saw?
     
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  4. Terrence Jefferson

    Terrence Jefferson ArboristSite Operative

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    So the saw has 2 chain brakes ?
     
  5. Ronie

    Ronie ArboristSite Guru

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  6. U&A

    U&A Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Yup,

    Totally stupid




    Sent while firmly grasping my redline lubed RAM
     
  7. Terrence Jefferson

    Terrence Jefferson ArboristSite Operative

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    Thank you all for the education. I have never seen one so I was a bit confused and chain brake never came to mind. Lol
     
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  8. cus_deluxe

    cus_deluxe Thats what she said.

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    understatement. lol!
     
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  9. Huskybill

    Huskybill Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Its all about being safe. I would think for home owners it’s a benefit. Someone with less experience or makes the experienced cutter safer.

    I say anything that makes us safer and we return home in the Evening in the same condition as we arrived in the morning. Chainsaw safety never sleeps because the danger is always present.
     
  10. foeke

    foeke ArboristSite Operative

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    For me, it is second nature to switch on the break with my wrist as soon as I want to change position. Unfortunately I'm not automaticly unbreaking when in position a 100% of times.
    But I see so often peeps walking around relying on chainfricktion and not tripping to not saw their legs off.
    So I totally agree that if it makes more people use their chainbrake before cutting themselves, it can't be called completely useless.

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  11. Huskvarna hotellgäst

    Huskvarna hotellgäst ArboristSite Operative

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    The first time I tried a saw with Triobrake, I asked how it came to be developed. I didn't understand when the answer came, "To prevent right hand injuries." The idea of taking my right hand off the rear handle to apply the brake had never occurred to me.
     
  12. Huskybill

    Huskybill Addicted to ArboristSite

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    There’s probably more people who are unsafe with chainsaws than we think?
    I wonder what’s the number of chainsaw accidents each year ? There has to be a data base somewhere?
     
  13. The Satch

    The Satch ArboristSite Lurker

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  14. Natster

    Natster ArboristSite Operative

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    Many folks who run saws have injuries.
    I've cut my left knee cap 2x, same place. I have "ruts" in the top of the cap. Not serious. 1st time, brings pulled the saw into my leg. Second time. Cutting a log with tension. Threw saw out, into my leg.
    Both times, stiches by SAME local doc. Doc bill was less than $200, for each event.
    I think most folks who run saws, have minor injuries.
    Nate
     
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  15. Tin-knocker

    Tin-knocker ArboristSite Operative

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    I’ve been hurt dirtbiking. Doing construction work. Working on things. Clearing trail (while the chainsaw was off) but I haven’t been hurt by a chainsaw yet. Maybe it’s just me but when I work with that saw I am more careful than I am in daily life. Sometime you can be millimeters from an accident that is a minor injury and one that is life threatening. You don’t get to decide how serious the injury is when it happens. Be safe out there everyone!
     
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  16. Huskybill

    Huskybill Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I never got hurt on the dirtbike but that quad tried to kill me four times. With the chainsaw my husky 240sg I was being greedy cutting the tops down to 1” diameter to heat the house for starter. I was bent over doing a balancing act on the larger branches, plus I had the Carolina high top leather boots on. The saw kicked back and she ran the bar tip across the tip of my boot. My reaction time was quick my toes curled under my foot. Lol. It just left a mark in the very tip of the sole of the boot. I never cut the small stuff again it’s not worth it. Just can’t be frugal too much.
     
  17. Huskybill

    Huskybill Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Wow that many, my gut feeling I knew it was high but that’s higher than I thought.

    Working in the elevator industry we had around thirty deaths per year of the elevator mechanics when I first started working there. It was the norm. Till osha and the company execs started firing leaders. They turned it down to 2 or 3 deaths per year and that was unacceptable. One boss in one department was told he would be held accountable if anyone got hurt under his leadership.

    I guess that OSHA is behind the changes on safety. I’m all for it as long as it is safer.
     
  18. Huskybill

    Huskybill Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I wonder what’s on the list of the 10 most dangerous jobs today.?


    It was,

    1. Coal mining
    2. Logging
    3. Elevator mechanic
    4. ?
    5. ?
    6. ?
    7. ?
    8. ?
    9. ?
    10. ?

    In elevator school they teach in a fall you have the first two feet to react after that gravity and speed take over there’s nothing you can do to save yourself. You need to think quick, don’t take chances. I witnessed an elevator mechanic slip and fall. We just hung a rope in the hoistway to haul stuff up from the first floor. Luckily him being a mechanic for many decades he grabbed the rope and locked his legs on it as he started to fall. His new helper was new first day on the job, on the forth floor opening watching him slide by thinking I gotta do that too? He luckily stopped at the knot at the bottom of the rope at the first floor. There was dirt and dust on the steel beams in the building that’s how the mechanic slipped.

    I taught everyone clear your minds of all outside thoughts, and think about what work your doing. Blockout all your thoughts. I even taught my sons that too when running chainsaws it’s you and the saw never mind thinking about your hot date tonight, focus on the task at hand.
     
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  19. Westboastfaller

    Westboastfaller Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Nah... Comicosi pilots and suicide bombers have to be #1 &#2. Haha

    North American it is Logging, Fishing and pilots for fatalities. Pilots due to small crafts.

    It will be said 'King crab fishing' is the single most dangerous job in NA over Timber falling but separate West coast Falling from interior Falling as they separated the Bering Sea crabbing from other commercial crabbing then it's not even close. King crabbing has a small fleet so if one boat goes down every so many yrs then that makes it very dangerous.
     
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  20. foeke

    foeke ArboristSite Operative

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    That actually makes a lot of sense. I can see my inexperienced relatives and friends do the same. Scary ****.
    Those are some high numbers btw.



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