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Damaged tree snaps off climber walks away

Phoenix1027

Phoenix1027

New Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2021
Messages
3
Location
Nelson
Recently while working on a job site where a large spruce about 70' tall that had been damaged in a wind storm was being removed the tree snapped approximately 20 feet from base while the climber was about 50 feet off the ground the only reason he survived the fall was because the portion that he was tied into that snapped got caught up in another tree and came to a stop about 20 feet off the ground. Amazingly the only injury incurred was a scratch on his leg and he was able to get to the ground unaided. I am posting this to remind people to do there do diligence when it comes to safety assessments and that if you don't have the know how or it feels unsafe or you are unsure stop working and get out of the tree, the bottom line is that taking 15 or 20 minutes longer to complete a job safely is always a better option then going to a funeral we are apart of a small community and every death is felt by all in this industry lets stay safe out there everyone. 20210115_225022.jpg 20210115_224854.jpg
 
Phoenix1027

Phoenix1027

New Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2021
Messages
3
Location
Nelson
It snapped off while being rigged down it was a bad call and should have been take out with a bucket truck instead of a climber a lesson i know i will never forget.
 
Twinpines

Twinpines

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Jan 24, 2021
Messages
13
Location
North texas
Recently while working on a job site where a large spruce about 70' tall that had been damaged in a wind storm was being removed the tree snapped approximately 20 feet from base while the climber was about 50 feet off the ground the only reason he survived the fall was because the portion that he was tied into that snapped got caught up in another tree and came to a stop about 20 feet off the ground. Amazingly the only injury incurred was a scratch on his leg and he was able to get to the ground unaided. I am posting this to remind people to do there do diligence when it comes to safety assessments and that if you don't have the know how or it feels unsafe or you are unsure stop working and get out of the tree, the bottom line is that taking 15 or 20 minutes longer to complete a job safely is always a better option then going to a funeral we are apart of a small community and every death is felt by all in this industry lets stay safe out there everyone. View attachment 882552 View attachment 882553
A change of britches was in order...
 
rarefish383

rarefish383

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Joined
Nov 2, 2009
Messages
8,491
Location
MD
He dodged a statistical bullet. We had a poster on the wall of the office from our insurance company. It listed the possible/probable injuries from falling from different heights. It started from 4-6 inches, tripping on a curb, twisted/broken ankle, broken wrist from trying to catch yourself, On up to 30 feet. 30 and up was considered 100% dead. You hear of people falling off things way over 30 feet, but, they don't move the scale enough to make it 99.9%. I just did a search to double check my memory. I found some government report from 2013. I think it covered 150,000 work related falls. In the 26-30 feet range there were 60 falls requiring loss of work, 17 fatal. In the 30 and over category, there were 50 recorded and all 50 were fatal. The last category was 30 and over, so, one could have fallen from an airplane at 5,000 feet and the chute didn't open?
 
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