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HOMEMADE CHAINSAW TOOLS

Wood Doctor

Wood Doctor

Edwin
Joined
Jan 10, 2008
Messages
11,143
Location
Omaha, Nebraska
Holy cow, I have one of those that I got in a box of random chainsaw tools, and I didn't even know what it was for.
Believe me, it works, I've repaired a dozen or so saws with it. Attaching that strong spring is a nightmare without it. I once used a cable and pulled it on, but that will not work on many saws because the case blocks the cable. One of my buddies made his by milling a 6" length of small angle iron. But, he likes mine better.
 
hotshot

hotshot

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Apr 11, 2009
Messages
2,621
Location
Midwest
I'm pretty sure it was here on AS that I read of someone that drilled the side of the jaws of a crescent wrench to something very similar to this
Universal 12" spanner wrench.

That was me, but the gremlins got the old pictures. It took two drill bits to drill those holes as the metal is harder than you'd think.

Used for all saws, but marked it "Poulan" so Dad could remember what tool is used to pull his clutch off.

Initially had put roll pins in it, but then inserted cut off drill bits inside them after a tough clutch removal tried to bend them. An impact gun & the correct factory socket/spanner tool is still the best way, provided you're in the shop.

IMG_0331 A.JPG


IMG_0329 B.JPG


IMG_0330 C.JPG
 
pantelis

pantelis

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Oct 17, 2014
Messages
1,261
Age
46
Universal 12" spanner wrench.

That was me, but the gremlins got the old pictures. It took two drill bits to drill those holes as the metal is harder than you'd think.

Used for all saws, but marked it "Poulan" so Dad could remember what tool is used to pull his clutch off.

Initially had put roll pins in it, but then inserted cut off drill bits inside them after a tough clutch removal tried to bend them. An impact gun & the correct factory socket/spanner tool is still the best way, provided you're in the shop.

View attachment 388423


View attachment 388424


View attachment 388425
very smart, congratulations
 
gulity1

gulity1

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Apr 4, 2009
Messages
862
Location
Michigan
Here is my case splitter its a copy of the husky style I found a picture of it on Evilbay. I emailed to myself at work Printed it out and started playing with it on the photo copier getting to auctal size. I took a guess that the square relief area is an inch and kept blowing it up until I got to the proper size. Once I got there I cut I tout and traced it onto a .25 plate and torched to size took my grinder to it and viola I then welded it to a piece of 1.25 x .25 sq tube. the left and right are 2 separate pieces, it was easier to get the 1" space that way. Here are some pictures with a scale and square on them for reference, if anyone wants it.
S8000907.JPG S8000908.JPG S8000913.JPG
 
Wood Doctor

Wood Doctor

Edwin
Joined
Jan 10, 2008
Messages
11,143
Location
Omaha, Nebraska
I think I will make one like the one above and add a hardwood handle to help hold it. I might make a half dozen or so.
Well, here it is, my modified version of the bar scraper that RockJock posted. I added a 4.5" long hardwood handle after I found some scrap right angle steel stock that was exactly .05" thick. Then I shaped it with a dull hook, tapering back toward the handle:


Each has two hooks at right angles to each other. Both seem to work perfectly:


I used four flathead screws to mount the steel to the handle, countersinking the heads. Then I added a finish by painting the steel with Rustoleum and varnishing the handle. Two are now completed, and my logger buddy gets one of them for Christmas. I'm keeping the other one for myself. I'm now working on another design that only has one hook, but the right angle idea that I stumbled on adds considerable strength.
 
Wood Doctor

Wood Doctor

Edwin
Joined
Jan 10, 2008
Messages
11,143
Location
Omaha, Nebraska
Before I discovered the Sawzall blade 'trick', I modified a painter's tool, re-shaping some of the corner profiles to fit the grooves and oil holes, etc.:
View attachment 389221

Philbert
Looks good, Philbert. I think the important item here is the thickness of the scraper's steel. Most typical paint scrapers, like mine that is now permanently retired from groove cleaning, are far less then .05" thick. Shucks, I may look for a sheet metal gauge that comes in at 0.068" and reserve that groove cleaner for all my big Stihl bars.

Oh, and I should drill a hole near the end of that handle for a short braided nylon leash. I'll do that tonight, prior to a Christmas delivery tomorrow. Thanks for the Pic.
 
Philbert

Philbert

Chainsaw Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 25, 2006
Messages
17,097
Location
Minnesota
I actually had the opposite problem! When I tried the better quality, chrome-plated, Hyde type tools, several were too thick to fit in my 0.050" bars. So I had to bring a clean bar into Menard's and try to find one ('6-in-One Painter's Tool') that fit, and still had a nice handle, etc. For thicker grooves, I hold and pull the tool at a slight angle. Nothing beats compressed air for a final cleaning.

I like your simple, low-profile design.

Philbert
 
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