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How can I help top of my tree?

Discussion in 'Homeowner Helper Forum' started by Zedekias, Jun 9, 2018.

  1. Zedekias

    Zedekias ArboristSite Lurker

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    I moved into a new house this last winter and this tree's leaves just stopped growing at the top this spring. I thought it might have been from a hailstorm but that was over a month ago and hasn't recovered still.

    I've been watering it a lot the past few days and used an organic fertilizer.

    Any suggestions? Thanks
     

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  2. Jed1124

    Jed1124 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Your problem is most likely in the roots. A picture of the trunk where it contacts the soil would be helpful.
     
  3. Zedekias

    Zedekias ArboristSite Lurker

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    I'm assuming I need to at the very least dig out the mulch in the ring? I can't easily remove the whole thing because my HOA are a bunch of nazis.
     

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  4. Zedekias

    Zedekias ArboristSite Lurker

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    Well I cut back the tulips and took out the mulch. There really wasn't very much though. There's soil right up against the trunk. Is that OK or do I need to pull it back some so the tree can get a little more o2?
     
  5. Jed1124

    Jed1124 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    It looks like it was originally planted to deep or is over mulched. Good chance of a girdling root. Mulch should not be against the trunk. Pull it away then dig down gently until you find the root flair.
     
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  6. Zedekias

    Zedekias ArboristSite Lurker

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    Well I dug down as gently as I could. And I definitely found some girdling by some smaller roots that I cut off. I found a few that were about the size of a cell phone charger cord that seemed to be strangulating quite a bit.

    But now it seems like some of these other bigger roots still might be girdling? I wanted to see what you thought before I did anything dumb.
     

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  7. Zedekias

    Zedekias ArboristSite Lurker

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    I think the one I was concerned about the most is in the last picture next to those two little ball/nubs.
     
  8. ropensaddle

    ropensaddle Feel Lucky

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    No root flare, tree was planted like a tomato :sucks:. Since you dug but did not find the root flare and found instead girdling look into proper planting for the next tree that is planted. Make sure you or your contractor does the job right!https://www.treesaregood.org/treeowner/plantingatree
     
  9. Zedekias

    Zedekias ArboristSite Lurker

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    I'm really **** out of luck? No saving this tree?
     
  10. Zedekias

    Zedekias ArboristSite Lurker

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    This picture is from last fall. Does it make any difference that this just happened this season?
     

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  11. Jed1124

    Jed1124 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    The trunk is girdled. You can try to cut it out but the prognosis is not good. That' being said it worth a try if you would like to keep the tree. Get a good set od chisels and make a clean cut. Google pruning girdling root.
     
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  12. ropensaddle

    ropensaddle Feel Lucky

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    You can try by chiseling the girding roots away but the too deep problem will still be there. If you want to try, "go for it" but my recommendation would be study correct planting methods and plant its replacement too because; even if you make it survive, it will likely be out performed by a new plant planted correctly.
     
  13. Zedekias

    Zedekias ArboristSite Lurker

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    Well I'm going for it for now. It's definitely not the best time to plant anything right now anyway.

    Hopefully I can get it to last a bit longer and I can replant something new this fall or next spring.

    Thanks guys
     
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  14. ropensaddle

    ropensaddle Feel Lucky

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    At least your armed with info, good luck!
    I like planting in the fall transition when its 50 to 60s for the highs !
     

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