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How would guys aproach this?

bucksnbears

bucksnbears

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Jan 25, 2016
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this is a burr oak thats 28" at waist height.
All those branches going out the side are growing toward /over a foodplot.
I would like to cut them back what time of year should this be done and should they be cut close to the tree?
Thanks for any advice
 

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buzz sawyer

buzz sawyer

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Do you necessarily want to save the tree? Wounds that large take a long time to compartmentalize, if ever, creating opening for rot. Looks like the tree is growing towards the clearing - normal. Future branches will likely come out the same direction. Unless the tree has special meaning to someone, considering the amount of lean, if it were me, I'd just remove it.
 

svk

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If longevity of the tree is of concern, cut the limbs in the winter. I personally would remove those field edge trees that are growing towards the plot. They will eventually fall onto the plot.
 
bucksnbears

bucksnbears

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I absolutely want to save this tree as its a major view blocker for my cabin from the road. ?
I'm not so concerned about it growing over the plot as I am the weight of those limbs. Would hate to see that big burr start tipping/break.
 

svk

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Pole saw is your friend. Take small sections from the outside and work your way in towards the trunk on those big limbs.

If you try to cut them close to the tree initially that limb will try to kill you.
 

old CB

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I'm not so concerned about it growing over the plot as I am the weight of those limbs. Would hate to see that big burr start tipping/break.
It's been a while since I lived in burr oak territory so I forget a lot about the species, but trees in general are remarkably good at keeping themselves erect despite a lot of lean. Check out some enormous cottonwoods, for instance, with tremendous lean (altho some of them do eventually go down). But that tree doesn't strike me as ready to go over.
 
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esshup

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If Oak Wilt Disease is in your area, you should trim between November and before the sap starts running in the Spring. It may be too late already, it is here in Northern Indiana. I agree, the pole saw will be your friend.
 
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