ArboristSite.com Sponsors
Traverse Creek Inc


Scrounging firewood

chipper1

chipper1

Living Life to the Full
Joined
Nov 5, 2014
Messages
35,918
Location
GR. MI.
Oh man felt like I sprinted for three miles. Had to keep going though just in case a neighbor was watching me lol. So you use a smaller bar and chain for yard trees? Only running a 20” bar now. Also I’m already looking for a 7900, damn CAD got me already
That's funny.
I like to run my 550 with a 325 chain and my smaller saws with 3/8 picco for doing work on lawns as those chains leave smaller chips than standard 3/8.

You might as well get a 7900 that's ported too:chainsaw::lol:. That being said, I know how it is all too well :sucks:. The truth is the 6100 is a great all around saw, it can run a 20 or even a 24 without much of a problem. If you plan on burying a 24 on a normal basis, then I could see "needing" a larger saw. Most of what I do could be done with a modern pro grade 50cc saw, but when I really need a 70cc saw I really need it, but it's not that often. I sure like the power of a ported 70cc saw though:yes:.
 
MustangMike

MustangMike

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Jan 5, 2014
Messages
9,570
Location
Brewster, NY
the low side and I think T adjustment is kicking my ass
It is more about patience than rocket science.

Most saws have 3 adjustment screws ... Hi, Low and Idle. The idle screw just simply opens the throttle a bit when you turn it clockwise, but sometimes it is turned out so far that you need to move it quite a bit for it to do anything. (It won't raise the idle till it is turned in enough to make contact).

First, check where your Low screw is set. (Gently screw it in all the way, keeping track of how much it turns till it stops). Usually, a good starting point is about one turn out.

Then, slowly turn the Low one way or the other and see if the idle picks up or smooth's out. If you can not fix the idle by doing this, you may need to adjust the idle screw for a higher idle (turn clockwise till you hear the idle increase).

Hope this helps.
 
Ambull01

Ambull01

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Oct 30, 2014
Messages
2,379
Location
Northern VA
It is more about patience than rocket science.

Most saws have 3 adjustment screws ... Hi, Low and Idle. The idle screw just simply opens the throttle a bit when you turn it clockwise, but sometimes it is turned out so far that you need to move it quite a bit for it to do anything. (It won't raise the idle till it is turned in enough to make contact).

First, check where your Low screw is set. (Gently screw it in all the way, keeping track of how much it turns till it stops). Usually, a good starting point is about one turn out.

Then, slowly turn the Low one way or the other and see if the idle picks up or smooth's out. If you can not fix the idle by doing this, you may need to adjust the idle screw for a higher idle (turn clockwise till you hear the idle increase).

Hope this helps.
Yep, yes sir that helps. I read an article (from Madsen or something like that I believe). Turned all the adjustment screws until they were lightly seated then adjusted from there. I think they’re not too bad but wanted them all to be perfect, kinda OCD lol. I may mess around with it some more and hopefully be satisfied with it eventually
 

svk

Saw Hoarder
Joined
Oct 19, 2009
Messages
26,798
Location
MN
Kind of in a foul mood yesterday so didn’t do much except sharpen some chains and worked on my McCinderblock a bit. My dad died 21 years ago on Easter Saturday and despite my best efforts I just cannot enjoy myself on Easter. I always honor his legacy on the date that he passed (4/22) but no matter what I feel his loss on Easter Sunday. I thought after this long that it wouldn’t impact me but it still does.

I must have sharpened at least twelve chains yesterday and am now completely caught up with the 3/8” loops from the bucket of rocked chains I had saved up plus
a couple off of saws from the working fleet. I have not yet done the depth gauges on these as I prefer to hand file those so I can get the nice rounded edge on the leading edge which makes the chain cut smoother. Side note-I don’t rock many chains myself. These were mostly new to me chains that someone else had rocked.

I continue to learn the ropes of the new to me chain grinder from Philbert. I’ve become pretty good with the adjustment and not overheating the cutter when grinding back rocked cutters. Also dressing the wheel when it gets cruddy. I see why @Philbert cleans his chains prior to sharpening. For me the biggest thing is paying attention to how deep I cut as different brands of chain require different heights. Sometimes I feel like selling all of my chains except for full chisel Oregon so I can level set things.

I sharpened one Vanguard chain from the McCinder saw that I had used for a big stumping project at the park. Used the grinder to set the depth gauges and the saw cut very well. Never had a complaint with the cutting speed of Vanguard but adjusting THOSE depth gauges manually is a pain.

That saw hadn’t been oiling right and the bar adjustment was weird. Finally realized it was due to a homemade bar tensioner piece that must have been robbed from a different saw. It was binding when you tightened the bar nuts down and the bar oil was just running out along the side of the bar plates. Nabbed one from a parts saw and after cleaning the goop from the bar rails it seems to be oiling properly now. I’m planning on holding onto this saw for stumping purposes as despite its gangly appearance it’s got plenty of power and has that nice raspy McCulloch exhaust tone. Plus I only paid $30 for it.

B5B62EB1-C7C4-4731-A4DD-CDEED77761EB.jpeg
 
old CB

old CB

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Jul 4, 2011
Messages
1,061
Location
CO
McCinder block was my saw for a number of years, so some nostalgia looking at yours, SVK. Mine went to camp (along with another for parts), but then it was acting up, not running right, and since I have no shop full of tools at camp and don't want to spend camp time putzing with a balky 610, I traded the yellow antiques in and bought a 562. Now there's a fine saw.
 
sean donato

sean donato

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Aug 3, 2014
Messages
2,098
Location
Eastern, PA
Kind of in a foul mood yesterday so didn’t do much except sharpen some chains and worked on my McCinderblock a bit. My dad died 21 years ago on Easter Saturday and despite my best efforts I just cannot enjoy myself on Easter. I always honor his legacy on the date that he passed (4/22) but no matter what I feel his loss on Easter Sunday. I thought after this long that it wouldn’t impact me but it still does.

I must have sharpened at least twelve chains yesterday and am now completely caught up with the 3/8” loops from the bucket of rocked chains I had saved up plus
a couple off of saws from the working fleet. I have not yet done the depth gauges on these as I prefer to hand file those so I can get the nice rounded edge on the leading edge which makes the chain cut smoother. Side note-I don’t rock many chains myself. These were mostly new to me chains that someone else had rocked.

I continue to learn the ropes of the new to me chain grinder from Philbert. I’ve become pretty good with the adjustment and not overheating the cutter when grinding back rocked cutters. Also dressing the wheel when it gets cruddy. I see why @Philbert cleans his chains prior to sharpening. For me the biggest thing is paying attention to how deep I cut as different brands of chain require different heights. Sometimes I feel like selling all of my chains except for full chisel Oregon so I can level set things.

I sharpened one Vanguard chain from the McCinder saw that I had used for a big stumping project at the park. Used the grinder to set the depth gauges and the saw cut very well. Never had a complaint with the cutting speed of Vanguard but adjusting THOSE depth gauges manually is a pain.

That saw hadn’t been oiling right and the bar adjustment was weird. Finally realized it was due to a homemade bar tensioner piece that must have been robbed from a different saw. It was binding when you tightened the bar nuts down and the bar oil was just running out along the side of the bar plates. Nabbed one from a parts saw and after cleaning the goop from the bar rails it seems to be oiling properly now. I’m planning on holding onto this saw for stumping purposes as despite its gangly appearance it’s got plenty of power and has that nice raspy McCulloch exhaust tone. Plus I only paid $30 for it.

View attachment 899326
Looks a lot like my pm605, heavy and shaky, but starts, and cuts everytime I have mine out.
 

svk

Saw Hoarder
Joined
Oct 19, 2009
Messages
26,798
Location
MN
McCinder block was my saw for a number of years, so some nostalgia looking at yours, SVK. Mine went to camp (along with another for parts), but then it was acting up, not running right, and since I have no shop full of tools at camp and don't want to spend camp time putzing with a balky 610, I traded the yellow antiques in and bought a 562. Now there's a fine saw.
Totally understand that!

I’m very mindful of not cutting with dull chains on my nicer saws but sometimes you are halfway through a stump cut and hit something and I want a saw that I won’t feel bad running through the rest of the cut with a dull chain so this saw is perfect as it’s both fairly torquey and wouldn’t be a loss if it did burn up.

Also-a PM610 won’t grow legs and walk away from your truck when you stop for breakfast or a beer. I always have to lock up the better saws when I stop.
 
Ambull01

Ambull01

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Oct 30, 2014
Messages
2,379
Location
Northern VA
Kind of in a foul mood yesterday so didn’t do much except sharpen some chains and worked on my McCinderblock a bit. My dad died 21 years ago on Easter Saturday and despite my best efforts I just cannot enjoy myself on Easter. I always honor his legacy on the date that he passed (4/22) but no matter what I feel his loss on Easter Sunday. I thought after this long that it wouldn’t impact me but it still does.

I must have sharpened at least twelve chains yesterday and am now completely caught up with the 3/8” loops from the bucket of rocked chains I had saved up plus
a couple off of saws from the working fleet. I have not yet done the depth gauges on these as I prefer to hand file those so I can get the nice rounded edge on the leading edge which makes the chain cut smoother. Side note-I don’t rock many chains myself. These were mostly new to me chains that someone else had rocked.

I continue to learn the ropes of the new to me chain grinder from Philbert. I’ve become pretty good with the adjustment and not overheating the cutter when grinding back rocked cutters. Also dressing the wheel when it gets cruddy. I see why @Philbert cleans his chains prior to sharpening. For me the biggest thing is paying attention to how deep I cut as different brands of chain require different heights. Sometimes I feel like selling all of my chains except for full chisel Oregon so I can level set things.

I sharpened one Vanguard chain from the McCinder saw that I had used for a big stumping project at the park. Used the grinder to set the depth gauges and the saw cut very well. Never had a complaint with the cutting speed of Vanguard but adjusting THOSE depth gauges manually is a pain.

That saw hadn’t been oiling right and the bar adjustment was weird. Finally realized it was due to a homemade bar tensioner piece that must have been robbed from a different saw. It was binding when you tightened the bar nuts down and the bar oil was just running out along the side of the bar plates. Nabbed one from a parts saw and after cleaning the goop from the bar rails it seems to be oiling properly now. I’m planning on holding onto this saw for stumping purposes as despite its gangly appearance it’s got plenty of power and has that nice raspy McCulloch exhaust tone. Plus I only paid $30 for it.
That saw looks heavy as hell, probably a great bicep workout. I'm not sure I could handle using a saw that always requires you to tinker with it to get it running right.
 

svk

Saw Hoarder
Joined
Oct 19, 2009
Messages
26,798
Location
MN
That saw looks heavy as hell, probably a great bicep workout. I'm not sure I could handle using a saw that always requires you to tinker with it to get it running right.
You know it doesn’t feel that heavy but I only use it for occasional bucking and it’s dedicated for stumping.

It runs great-I just needed to work out the oiling issue. No fault of that saw that someone decided to put the wrong part on it.

I don’t mind worrking through teething issues on saws. I do lose patience quickly when I get a saw that has multiple issues that come up shortly after the last issue was repaired. Been there a few times.
 
Ambull01

Ambull01

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Oct 30, 2014
Messages
2,379
Location
Northern VA
I'm kind of hoping that guy either sold the Husq 372 or never responds lol. I already have a saw so not sure why the hell I started looking for another one. Plus I don't have a wood fireplace/stove so I'm just doing this for a future outdoor fireplace/fire pit. Anyone ever cut wood just to do it with no intention of actually using it to burn? I may have to do something like that and just see it as a hobby.
 
chipper1

chipper1

Living Life to the Full
Joined
Nov 5, 2014
Messages
35,918
Location
GR. MI.
I'm kind of hoping that guy either sold the Husq 372 or never responds lol. I already have a saw so not sure why the hell I started looking for another one. Plus I don't have a wood fireplace/stove so I'm just doing this for a future outdoor fireplace/fire pit. Anyone ever cut wood just to do it with no intention of actually using it to burn? I may have to do something like that and just see it as a hobby.
You may save a few seconds a cut, but a well sharpened chain can do that. You will also loose a bit of fuel economy and it will be heavier. Unless you're cutting consistently larger wood it's not going to make a life changing difference. Now if you just want a faster saw, that's a different thing altogether lol.
Here's a stock 6421. All the videos below I have recently posted, sorry but they are all somewhat pertinent to the discussion. Yours probably cuts just a few seconds slower than this one.
Stock 7910 in a little larger piece of the same log, it was also frozen.
Here's a 372 cylinder with a 268 popup, base gasket in place, muffler mod, timing advance, and a round filed chain. Same log, you can see the part I'm cutting in the above videos just down the log a couple ft.
All the cutting on this log is just for testing saws/chains, that being said I do burn every batch of cookies I make :blob2::lol:.
If you open these up on YouTube you can see a bunch of different saws cutting on my channel, I normally put the chain type and size, how it was filed(round or square), and the mods to the saw in the description for reference.
 
sean donato

sean donato

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Aug 3, 2014
Messages
2,098
Location
Eastern, PA
Just started my 10 day rotations at work, started with a 4 day weekend. Broke out the 359 husqy to give it a bit of exercise, I really dont use it much since I got the 562xp. Just cutting up some limbs I brought home, and getting the wood pile moved off the garden spot. Have to run over to my mates house later today and help pit up the side boards on his shop. Trusses are set to be delivered the 23rd. Hoping my wife gets her schedule for the rest of the month this week. (Well today really) planning a trip to get up to see farmer Steve. Be nice to put a face to a name I've seen for so long. Tomorrow I'm going to look at a dump trailer with my uncle, at lunch. Its needed for both of us, just not sure I like the $10k price tag that goes with it. 14k lbs (he doesnt have his cdl, so wants it down rated to 10k) 16ft long. Dont know if its barn door or gate, or really much else about it. Guess I'll find out tomorrow. I'm not a fan of him wanting to down rate the trailer weight, as we can get permanent tags for it at 14k, even fully loaded wouldnt put us over weight on either of our trucks (he has the twin to my 96 f-250) guess I'll just have to wait and see. Hes buying it, so it's up to him really.
Just seen 2 cardinals here next to me. Lovely birds. Like having them around.
 

Attachments

  • 20210405_120825.jpg
    20210405_120825.jpg
    1.9 MB · Views: 5
Ambull01

Ambull01

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Oct 30, 2014
Messages
2,379
Location
Northern VA
You may save a few seconds a cut, but a well sharpened chain can do that. You will also loose a bit of fuel economy and it will be heavier. Unless you're cutting consistently larger wood it's not going to make a life changing difference. Now if you just want a faster saw, that's a different thing altogether lol.
Here's a stock 6421. All the videos below I have recently posted, sorry but they are all somewhat pertinent to the discussion. Yours probably cuts just a few seconds slower than this one.
Stock 7910 in a little larger piece of the same log, it was also frozen.
Here's a 372 cylinder with a 268 popup, base gasket in place, muffler mod, timing advance, and a round filed chain. Same log, you can see the part I'm cutting in the above videos just down the log a couple ft.
All the cutting on this log is just for testing saws/chains, that being said I do burn every batch of cookies I make :blob2::lol:.
If you open these up on YouTube you can see a bunch of different saws cutting on my channel, I normally put the chain type and size, how it was filed(round or square), and the mods to the saw in the description for reference.
Crap every time I see a 6421 I kick myself for giving it away. I like that 7910 and 372 as well. Finally not sure what it is but it's kind of fun watching videos of other people running a chainsaw. Wife caught me watching some and just shook her head as she walked out of the room.
 
Top