advice for next saw to add to my CS milling setup

Down Home Dave

Down Home Dave

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
47
Location
Pennsylvania
Hm, how difficult is a top end rebuild?

What I'm actually considering right now is just waiting for the next stimulus check! Haha.

I just met with a tree service owner about a possible collaboration. He has a bunch of logs that he's kept, and needs someone to mill them. He already has a nice milling setup, just no time due to his tree service business doing well. He has an 880 with a long cannon bar, maybe 6 ft, with matching granberg mill, and a second double headed milling bar still in the sleeve. He even said that he would just get another 880 if we needed to use the double headed bar. He's also got some connections that he is going to check into for selling slabs and the like, so this may have the potential to turn into income, but we've got a long ways to figure all that stuff out. Needless to say, I may not need to worry so much about my personal setup at this time since he already has a much bigger setup and the saws needed, he also buys chain by the spool, so he just spins a loop when he needs to, and he still has part of a spool of ripping chain.

I've got a lot of research to do now on whether this can actually be a feasible business to cut slabs for a profit!
top end rebuild pretty easy. BUT, be sure ya know why you need a rebuild- low compression, straight gassed, air leak, etc... lots of advice around here and instruction- search around! Straight top end rebuild is easy on a pro saw- plug, 4 bolts, piston, rings, reverse the order.

as for making real money at this- its slow, HARD work. Not sure what the market is in your area but here in SW PA, theres a million mills and they are almost all slabbing now. Then you get into the drying- I have a hard time selling green wood. I personally got into this for my own wood use, but Ihave sold some specie specific stuff, probably at a loss. Not trying to discourage you. Be savvy, know your costs, make sure you count your time invested, tool costs, maintenance, gas, transport, etc. Oh, and get a metal detector!!! check those yard logs for nails and screws!!!
 

gnef

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Jan 11, 2021
Messages
20
Location
Atlanta
top end rebuild pretty easy. BUT, be sure ya know why you need a rebuild- low compression, straight gassed, air leak, etc... lots of advice around here and instruction- search around! Straight top end rebuild is easy on a pro saw- plug, 4 bolts, piston, rings, reverse the order.

as for making real money at this- its slow, HARD work. Not sure what the market is in your area but here in SW PA, theres a million mills and they are almost all slabbing now. Then you get into the drying- I have a hard time selling green wood. I personally got into this for my own wood use, but Ihave sold some specie specific stuff, probably at a loss. Not trying to discourage you. Be savvy, know your costs, make sure you count your time invested, tool costs, maintenance, gas, transport, etc. Oh, and get a metal detector!!! check those yard logs for nails and screws!!!
That is some great advice, I appreciate it! I think I'll wait until I have problems before I get the equipment I need to test for those things, which will hopefully not be for a long time! The 661 has been working exceptionally well for me so far, though it's still fairly new.

I also appreciate your experience with selling slabs. I am in Atlanta, so there could be some opportunities, but I definitely need to do much more research.
 
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