ArboristSite.com Sponsors
 
 


Any need to crosshatch new aftermarket cylinders?

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by Kaifus, Dec 6, 2018.

  1. Kaifus

    Kaifus ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    May 24, 2015
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Minnesota, USA
    Are aftermarket cylinders ready to go or do they need to be honed? I bought a piston/cylinder set from Bailey's for my Husqvarna 262xp that I burned up cutting off big stumps right at ground level and the crosshatching seams pretty weak.
     
  2. banditt007

    banditt007 ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2013
    Messages:
    197
    Likes Received:
    81
    Location:
    Somewhere
    I dont think there is any need. I've pulled a new jug from a dolmar 6400 and there was no crosshatching to speak of, just a nice new shiny bore.
     
  3. dswensen

    dswensen ArboristSite Guru

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2008
    Messages:
    857
    Likes Received:
    443
    Location:
    SW Washington
    What burned it up? You'll want to figure that out before you run that pretty new P/C set.
     
  4. Kaifus

    Kaifus ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    May 24, 2015
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Minnesota, USA
    I think I burned it up having the saw against the ground cutting the stumps off low as I could and cutting off the airflow through the engine. Stupid mistake.
     
  5. Franny K

    Franny K xyz

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2013
    Messages:
    2,024
    Likes Received:
    785
    Location:
    North eastern Ct USA
    If the cylinder has modern coating, nikasil, electrofusion, or something along those lines it takes diamond tooling to hone. I have my doubts stone type honing devices will do much at least for the large sections around the ports might make it worse depending on what sort of hone you use. I am not a chainsaw cylinder expert thought the cross hatch was more for iron bores.
     
    Little Al and hotshot like this.
  6. Kaifus

    Kaifus ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    May 24, 2015
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Minnesota, USA
    Okay thanks! I hope to put it together tomorrow and judging by when I first joined this forum it must have been back in May 2015 when I burned this saw up but I'm excited to maybe have it running again. Correct me if I'm wrong but I'm planning on not using any gasket sealer on the new cylinder gasket and I am planning on re-using the piston rod needle bearing.
     
  7. boltonranger

    boltonranger ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Messages:
    493
    Likes Received:
    133
    Location:
    Northeast
    So can you elaborate? I’m envisioning clutch side facing the ground. Wouldn’t that still allow proper air flow?
    What I’m wondering is if you instead were slipping the clutch and overheated it that way ... can we hear more?
     
  8. Kaifus

    Kaifus ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    May 24, 2015
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Minnesota, USA
    I was cutting big elm trees in my yard and yes the clutch side was facing the ground and basically on the ground with grass up around the saw as I was cutting the stumps as low as I could. I think with the ground and the grass and tough cutting of the big stumps I overheated and damaged the piston/cylinder?
     
  9. boltonranger

    boltonranger ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Messages:
    493
    Likes Received:
    133
    Location:
    Northeast
    Hmm... well, the “ breathing” parts are in through the starter side where all the venting is and out the front under and in front of the top handle.
    It’s an interesting thread.
    Tell me, were the revs high and even while you cut the stump or a lot of up and down?
     
  10. boltonranger

    boltonranger ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Messages:
    493
    Likes Received:
    133
    Location:
    Northeast
    So to cut to the chase what I’m wondering is :
    If you’re cutting dirty wood and have a dull chain (as you might when stumping) you start slipping the clutch and creating heat. Create too much and the clutch side seals overheat and then if you keep cutting it all goes wrong...

    I once cut some tough red oak with a friend and he did not realize this could happen. He had already killed his prior saw and I noticed he had a dull chain and was pressing hard and bogging a lot. So I showed him how to sharpen often and keep the revs up to avoid slipping.
    You can get the saw so hot that you melt the case if it’s not metal.

    May not be what happened in your case, but the thread reminded me of my buddy’s experience. Good luck with the saw!
     
  11. Kaifus

    Kaifus ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    May 24, 2015
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Minnesota, USA
    On that Husqvarna the cooling air goes straight through and out the clutch side. On a Stihl I used to finish that job the air goes straight through but also out the front a little which would have really helped in that situation.

    Yes the revs were high and even, they were big stumps and it took awhile to get cut across.
     
  12. CR888

    CR888 Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2013
    Messages:
    3,142
    Likes Received:
    5,151
    Location:
    Australia
    Honing is not necessary but after rebuild a pressure/vacuum test would be a good idea.
     
  13. SmellyPirateHooker

    SmellyPirateHooker ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2018
    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    229
    Location:
    Delaware
    It was always my opinion that they don't need it. Hatch marks were traditionally put in bores to help with brake in, but with a plated bore the rings never really bed into it. As far as I know the rings are made slightly different in design or material to compensate for this. Hatch marks were never intended to be around for the life of the engine, just brake in. Do it to a plated cylinder and I'd think they would be permanent. I know the dirt bike companies tell you not to on their plated cylinders, just rings and piston. Even on the 4 stokes where leakage can be more detrimental to performance. With high RPM 2 strokes, perticularly small displacement ones, as long as the rings aren't being lifted by some aluminum transfer they seal good enough. Hell there's even saws with just one ring like the 288xp, and that thing has no idea its lacking anything.
     

Share This Page