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CS Milling 101, Hints tips and tricks

Discussion in 'Milling & Saw Mills' started by BobL, Mar 18, 2009.

  1. Rockfarmer

    Rockfarmer ArboristSite Guru

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    I like the deck screws as well, 3 1/2", torx head

    They work great and can be used over and over :clap::clap:
     
  2. BobL

    BobL No longer addicted to AS

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    I have a tool box full of the tools dedicated to CS ops and milling that I keep in a tool box in my home shed and always put those tools back in there so I can just pick it up any time and go milling.

    That's way too organized for me but I definitely tips me hat to you!

    PLUS
    Plastic tub full of wedges
    Crow bar
    Pair of strong collapsible sawhorses
    Kangaroo jack for lifting logs
    2 x 6ft portable tressle table for servicing saw
    Funnel
    What I call my offset rack for starting awkward shaped logs
    Oil can - filled with bar oil
    Paint and paint brush
    Box of spare chains - I use an old power tool box and wrap the chains in rags or place inside chinese food containers
    Spare bars
    Alternate set of mill rails for mill
    Tarpaulin to throw over gear if it rains

    PLUS
    Small regular screwdriver
    Small 2" vice
    Pair of 12" clamps
    Digital Angle finder
    regular level
    Torx driver for new Stihls
    Small socket set
    Spare nuts and bolts for log rails, mill and saw.
    Magnetic anti-sag device for long bars.
    Chaps
    Full Face mask
    Gloves

    PLUS
    Hat
    Sun Screen
    Toilet Paper
    Cell phone
    First aid kit
    Pack of moist towlettes (fer cleanin greasy hands before eating)
    Plastic chair for sittin and filing!

    and a partridge in a pear tree!!!!!!!
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2009
  3. dallasm1

    dallasm1 ArboristSite Operative

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    NOT to start any controversy, but IF you decide to use vegetable oil for chain oil:

    1) If you leave your saw for any length of time (more than 2 weeks). Remove your chain and soak in motor oil until next time. Drain your saw oil resevoir completely. Vegetable oil will reduce down to a sticky goo after a relatively short period of time. In fact I NEVER leave the veg oil in my saw. Always empty the tank after every session.

    2) Do not store your oil in plastic containers where VARMINTS can get to it. I left my jug of Canola oil out one day and when I returned the rats had knawed through the container. Lost 5 liters of Mazola on that one. Animals LOVE the oil (all animals! My dogs are always licking up the dirt and sawdust around where I am milling).

    3) I have no opinion on canola vs. olive oil, virgin or otherwise.

    4) I also have no expert opinion on benefits. I have been using veg oil and the saw seems to behave the same in every way as when I was using official bar oil. I think there have been several threads here and on the chainsaw forum that discuss this in hideous detail.
     
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  4. BlueRider

    BlueRider ArboristSite Guru

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    No controversy intended here but if you use the comercial vegetable bar oils like Stihl's Bio plus there is no need to drain you saw. I have been using Bio plus for a over a year now and have not had any pronblems with it in the tank, even when the saw sat unused for several months. The outside of the saw is a different story, it needs to be cleaned off within a couple of weeks or it will get crusty. I feel it is worth the additional cost over bulk vegetable cooking oil.
     
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  5. BobL

    BobL No longer addicted to AS

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    Bar nose clamp options

    I get a few questions from folk about my bar nose clamps to maximize bar cutting length so I thought I would summarize some options here.

    Nose-options.jpg

    1: Shows the conventional Alaskan bar nose clamp on a roller or sprocket nose bar. Around 3-4 inches of bar length is lost because the clamp needs to steer clear of the roller

    2: Shows where the clamp can be placed on a hard nose bar. If you are careful and the clamp pads are not too large you can place the corners of the pads right up to where the bottom of the bar groove starts on the nose. Making the clamp pad as small as 1 sq inch can get you closer still.

    3: Shows a clamping mechanism that clamps onto a small (3/8" or less) bolt thru the middle of the roller. This is a safe place to drill on most bars.

    4: Is the same as 3: but with a small recess drilled into the middle of the clamp pad. This provides a more positive grip of the bolt. This won't work If you have a GB mill where the powerhead connects to the bar bolts since you wont be able to adjust the chain without adjusting the position of the outboard part of the mill. So instead of a hole you can also use a slot like this.
    Jawson.jpg

    A thread about this is here.

    5: shows a bolt thru everything. This is one of THE safest methods.

    6: Shows the location of the bolt/nut should sit inside the rivets that hold the roller/sprocket onto the nose.

    7. Putting a small bolt thru each clamp pad so that it contacts only the middle of the sprocket. No bar drilling needed!

    8. A variation of 5: with a bolt thru everything. This is also one of THE safest methods and on a GB style mill allows the chain to be changed without removing saw from mill.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2014
  6. aggiewoodbutchr

    aggiewoodbutchr Addicted to ArboristSite

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  7. BIG JAKE

    BIG JAKE Fix it right

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    Oil reservoirs

    Anybody have pics of oil reservoirs you made? I'd rather trade money for time and just buy one but need to keep cost down pending some head cutting at my company withing next 4-5 weeks. Never know. Anyway I saw aggies ball valve from a bathroom sink but didn't see the whole unit. I was thinking of an aluminum oxygen bottle cut down what capacity is optimal?
     
  8. BobL

    BobL No longer addicted to AS

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    Ah Ha - I forgot that option - picture and post above modified to that effect.

    CHeers
     
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  9. aggiewoodbutchr

    aggiewoodbutchr Addicted to ArboristSite

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    My reservoir is just made from a 3" PVC pipe, cap and clean-out.
     
  10. BobL

    BobL No longer addicted to AS

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    I reckon somewhere around a quart works pretty well.
    This one (Got the idea from Aggie, 3.5" pvc pipe) is just over a quart .
    AuxOilerTank.jpg

    As is this one on the BIL mill
    Aux_oil1.jpg

    This one is just under a quart: Can you see a certain house style here?
    auxoiler2.jpg

    This one is from another Aussie (Dai Sensei)
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2014
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  11. Brmorgan

    Brmorgan Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I emptied, stripped, and inverted an old fire extinguisher, put a ball valve on the neck and a hose leading to a fitting on the bar, and cut a hole in the bottom (now top) of the fire extinguisher as a fill point. Cost: $0
     
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  12. Brmorgan

    Brmorgan Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I do... One's Canadian and costs a fraction of the other.:cheers:
     
  13. BIG JAKE

    BIG JAKE Fix it right

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    Nice-that would be easy too.


    Nice examples-I'll have to see what's lying around. What point is optimal to drop the oil down onto? Was thinking seam on nose between rails and chain-almost 1/8" gap there on a new rollernose. Guess I could do a paper test and see how much oil flings off at certain points but you guys probably have this nailed already. Drip rate for 36-42" bars? I'll look at pics again. Be nice to segment a thread into categories so info isn't spread all over. Thks
     
  14. BobL

    BobL No longer addicted to AS

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    This post is about bar noses and oiler delivery points. Look at post number 3

    My 076 can deliver bar oil at the rate of 19 ml/min but no matter the quality of bar oil used (I use Stihl) quite a bit of this is flung off at the nose - I typically match that with the aux oiler - pretty well all of which gets to the cut. I also use canola in the Aux oiler as it doesn't need to be sticky because it doesn't need to go around a bar nose.

    The 880 can deliver 38 ml/min but quite a bit of this is also flung of at the nose so I run the aux oiler the same (maybe a touch less) as I do for the 076.

    The 3120 can deliver 58 mL/min - it's a real waste of oil as far as milling is concered as most of this get flung off at the nose.
     
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  15. aggiewoodbutchr

    aggiewoodbutchr Addicted to ArboristSite

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Here some pics of the oiler. I have since drilled the bar and have the oil going directly into the roller nose but I can't find the pics.

    The large section of hose just below the valve acts like an IV drip so I can see exactly how much oil is being delivered.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2009
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  16. BIG JAKE

    BIG JAKE Fix it right

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    My 076 can deliver bar oil at the rate of 19 ml/min but no matter the quality of bar oil used (I use Stihl) quite a bit of this is flung off at the nose - I typically match that with the aux oiler - pretty well all of which gets to the cut. I also use canola in the Aux oiler as it doesn't need to be sticky because it doesn't need to go around a bar nose.

    The 880 can deliver 38 ml/min but quite a bit of this is also flung of at the nose so I run the aux oiler the same (maybe a touch less) as I do for the 076.

    The 3120 can deliver 58 mL/min - it's a real waste of oil as far as milling is concered as most of this get flung off at the nose.[/QUOTE]


    You're both dropping the aux oil in the same place-good enough for me I've seen the stuff you guys mill. I like the IV visual drip too easier to quantify what yer putting on. Thanx fellers I'll post some pics on what I come up with.
    :cheers:
     
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  17. BobL

    BobL No longer addicted to AS

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    Aggie, if the bar nose is bolted to the outboard end of the mill and the inboard end is bolted by the bar bolts, how do you adjust your chain tension?
     
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  18. aggiewoodbutchr

    aggiewoodbutchr Addicted to ArboristSite

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    [​IMG]

    The mill is bolted to the bar independently from the saw. I can dismount the powerhead without changing anything on the mill.

    What you see here is a stiffener plate that takes the place of the stock cover and prevents the bar from flexing or bending.

    I may have started with a GB mill but there's now much of it left now.:D
     
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  19. BobL

    BobL No longer addicted to AS

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    Ah ha . . so its more or less identical to a "bolts onto the bar at both ends" with no bar underclamps, type alaskan?

    I also thought your sawdust guard was connected to your saw but I see it is not, does much sawdust sneak past the edge of the guard?

    My new 880 setup has also got a little away from the original BIL Mill connection (plus more sexy ally work courtesy of BIL!) I ended up using a longer support plate because the 880 is longer at the front of the saw than the 076 so I had to move it back from the mill a bit to get it to fit.
    Mount.jpg
    all2.jpg

    Thanks
    Bob
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2014
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  20. aggiewoodbutchr

    aggiewoodbutchr Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Some what. It bolts through the bar.

    It is attached to the saw. What you see touching the mill is not attached. Not much really gets past. Not enough to notice a difference anyway.


    Nice
     

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