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Cutting Down a Forked Tree

JD5210

JD5210

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maple1.jpg
I have a maple tree that is forked and needs to be cut down. My plan is to put the hinge on the left piece (see picture), make a plunge cut 1.5 inches behind the hinge and work towards the right, leaving myself a back strap. Then put wedges on both sides, then cut the back strap. My concern is as the tree begins to fall the left piece separates from the right. Leaving the right piece to go somewhere.

Do you think they will come apart? Would it help insure this does not happen if I use a repealing rope and wrap the two forks together just above where they fork apart? I could also use a logging chain to wrap them together?

I have successfully cut a lot of trees over the years, but never a forked tree.

Thanks in advance for any help on this.
 
old guy

old guy

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I'm not a pro, but have some experience felling trees from the ground.

If the two main trunks are separated below your shoulder height it is probably easier, and safer, to cut them as though they were separate trees.
Yup, don't try to cut those together, you will not like how that goes.
Cut the smaller one away first, then the other one.
 
arathol

arathol

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Assume they will come apart. Don't assume they won't.
Cut the the separate forks independently. Wrapping the lower trunk won't keep them from separating when the tree falls.
Use a rope to pull at least the first side over just in case the branches up high are intertwined. You don't want to get it all cut only to find out that it won't fall over ....
 
old CB

old CB

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Yes, you want to treat the two stems as if they were not connected at all, and dropping the left one first is a good plan. There should be no need for wedges, as that left stem has sufficient lean to pull itself over. It's possible that branches above might be tangled, but unlikely that you'll have an issue there, as the tree looks to have enough weight and lean to overcome these. When the left stem falls, the right one will be essentially unaffected--you can then treat it as its own thing.
 
catbuster

catbuster

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I really looks like included bark, not obvious rot, and they will come down as two stems. Take them down separately. Bore through the included bark and then wedge them over.
 
JD5210

JD5210

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Thank you to everyone that took the time to share their thoughts with me!

I am taking the suggestion to cut them separately. I have cut down the piece on the left and cleaned up the mess. Once I take down the fence, I will cut the one on the right.

Thanks again!
 
madhatte

madhatte

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Here you can see me cutting the second stem of a forked tree. Note that I deliberately ripped the union apart so that I knew for sure that they would fall as two separate stems. This was the safest and fastest method here, where there were no targets to worry about. This wood will be milled on-site and used for construction on a veteran's farm just getting started near Olympia, WA.
 
northmanlogging

northmanlogging

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2 reasonably safe ways to tackle a co-dom like those, fall em em both at the same time, ideally putting the face cut and hinge/hold wood perpendicular to the split or fall em seperately, but make the cuts above the seam, or at the very least saw through the seam to the level of your falling cuts.

which method depends on available targets lean, limb weight etc, and how high the seam goes.

They will split, either in the air, or when they hit ground.
 

Del_

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2 reasonably safe ways to tackle a co-dom like those, fall em em both at the same time, ideally putting the face cut and hinge/hold wood perpendicular to the split or fall em seperately, but make the cuts above the seam, or at the very least saw through the seam to the level of your falling cuts.

which method depends on available targets lean, limb weight etc, and how high the seam goes.

They will split, either in the air, or when they hit ground.
Great advice I think.

I'd like to add:

Look very carefully for intertwined limbs, especially if felling separately.
 
TheDarkLordChinChin

TheDarkLordChinChin

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If you have space in a situation like that then a tractor with a long rope or ratchet strap is invaluable.
Or an excavator to push it as you cut.
 
HumBurner

HumBurner

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Great advice I think.

I'd like to add:

Look very carefully for intertwined limbs, especially if felling separately.

If limbs are intertwined from the left fork into the right and directional control is less of an issue, make a small cut, diagonal, in the spot where you would normally place the face, then slash her down. I would start the cut more on the side closer to the operator, leaving your "holding wood" on the far side (assuming it won't catch in any of the nearby trees.)

May not be by the books, but should allow the limbs to slide loose, as opposed to making a normal face/back and having it catch; then your options become limited and putting a rope/line in extremely dangerous.

Obviously, if the limbs are locked, not just intertwined, you'll need a rope/line anyways.
 
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