ArboristSite.com Sponsors
 
 


Help with Husky 51 flywheel removal

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by Byrdmando, Dec 10, 2012.

  1. HarleyT

    HarleyT Tree Freak

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2014
    Messages:
    13,178
    Likes Received:
    10,153
    But Damn!!!!
     
  2. Saw Fixr

    Saw Fixr ArboristSite Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2018
    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    50
    Location:
    Mountain top
    Regardless of the method, the striking with a hammer idea, is to create a shock load to knock the flywheel off the taper. You Don’t need to keep the nut tight. Back it off a turn and put the socket on and knock away.
    I wouldn’t use a jaw type puller.
    I also would be hesitant to use the screwdriver behind the flywheel idea. Cast aluminum will crack before it flexes/bends. Been there, done that....anyone got an extra ms 270 flywheel?
     
  3. Ronie

    Ronie ArboristSite Guru

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2017
    Messages:
    563
    Likes Received:
    500
    Location:
    NC
    I slide a screwdriver behind the flywheel to put a little pressure on the flywheel and give the crank a tap and most of the time it pops right off.
     
  4. jchipps

    jchipps Arboristsite Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2018
    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    292
    Location:
    WV
    Just curious Harley: Who said anything about tightening the flywheel nut down? Surely no one would try to remove a flywheel with the nut tightened down?

    By the way, the center bolt on a 2 jaw puller is basically pushing against the end of the shaft while the jaws are under the wheel, pulling away from the taper.
    It pops the wheel free very smoothly and easily.

    Same concept as holding under the lip of the flywheel with one hand and smacking the end of the shaft with a hammer. Just much smoother.
     
  5. HarleyT

    HarleyT Tree Freak

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2014
    Messages:
    13,178
    Likes Received:
    10,153
     
  6. jchipps

    jchipps Arboristsite Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2018
    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    292
    Location:
    WV
    Oh okay, I wasn't really sure what he meant by any of that.
     
  7. Wood Doctor

    Wood Doctor Edwin

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2008
    Messages:
    10,247
    Likes Received:
    6,001
    Location:
    Omaha, Nebraska
    I never said I was going to tighten the nut down. Read my post #17 again. The Stihl lug nut would remain loose inside the socket. The edge of the socket would be against the flywheel. If the socket is loose to the flywheel, how does tapping on the socket going to loosen anything?
     
  8. jchipps

    jchipps Arboristsite Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2018
    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    292
    Location:
    WV
    I'm not really following what you're doing with the socket in your scenario?

    Harley can correct me if I'm wrong, but I picture his 'socket method' is done by using a "Flanged Nut" which is screwed onto the shaft, but only flush to the end of the shaft which is still loose enough to give the flywheel room to pop loose.

    Then place a socket which fits the "Flange Nut" correctly, which lets the socket rest on the Flange of the Flange nut.

    Now you can give the 'socket' a good tap with a hammer, while holding upward on the flywheel and pop it loose. Using the Flange nut and a socket just gives you a nice easy place to hit, and also less chance of hitting the flywheel by mistake or boogering the shaft threads.
     
  9. Wood Doctor

    Wood Doctor Edwin

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2008
    Messages:
    10,247
    Likes Received:
    6,001
    Location:
    Omaha, Nebraska
    If the end of the socket rests on the flange of the flange nut, it seems that then any tap on the socket will never be felt by the flywheel. The flywheel is tight to the drive shaft cone.

    I would think that there has to be a connection to the flywheel. For example, I have a 3" long pipe fitting that threads perfectly to the flywheel on a Stihl MS 660. I screw that fitting into the flywheel and one or two taps on the fitting separates the flywheel from the drive shaft almost instantly.
     
  10. jchipps

    jchipps Arboristsite Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2018
    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    292
    Location:
    WV
    No, when removing the flywheel you're not wanting to hit the 'flywheel' at all.

    With the hammer method, you simply slip your fingers of one hand under the edge of the flywheel and hold up on it (actually lift the weight of the saw slightly above your work surface)

    Then when you hit the end of the shaft, you are essentially shocking the shaft loose, and out of the Flywheel with the blow from the hammer.

    Nothing ever touches the flywheel except your fingers holding underneath it.

    PS - I'm not familiar with a 660 but on some saws, my o32 for example, the hub of the flywheel is threaded, in which case you can thread a special puller into it, and then by screwing the inner bolt of the puller against the end of the shaft, it pulls the flywheel up and off.

    Different animal and no need for a hammer on that type if you have the special puller, or make one.
     
  11. Wood Doctor

    Wood Doctor Edwin

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2008
    Messages:
    10,247
    Likes Received:
    6,001
    Location:
    Omaha, Nebraska
    OK, I'll try this deep-socket method next. Your 032 may have the same threads on the flywheel as my 660. The threads on a pipe nipple I found matched up and it only needs to be threaded on hand tight. Just a few taps here and there on the fitting with a wooden mallet will break the flywheel loose. No puller is required. This was a pleasant discovery (serendipitous?).

    I'm rather surprised Stihl never said anything about it in the service manual. One has to wonder why the threads were cut on the flywheel. I can't see how they would be used in assembly or what other purpose they would serve.
     

Share This Page