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Log splitter kinetic or hydraulic??

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by The Diesel, Dec 1, 2016.

  1. The Diesel

    The Diesel ArboristSite Lurker

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    Well my wood splitter is on last leg. who knows how old it is but we replaced the engine at least once. between me my dad brother and uncle we split quite a few chords a year.

    I was looking at a 35 ton Bradley hydraulic splitter . Seems heavy duty. anyone have any experience? they are made here in IL.

    The kinetic splitters have peaked my interest but we split pretty much all oak and red elm that isnt real dry and I worry if they are strong enough. super split seem to get better review but they are $2500. Dr rapidfire are cheaper but reviews don't seem to good.

    What do you all think?
     
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  2. litefoot

    litefoot Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I can't help with the question of which one. I think it honestly comes down to personal preference. I don't think anyone has ever posted a bad review of a SS. Never heard of Bradley, but I did look it up. Looks like a lot of splitter for little money. Wonder why it's not mentioned more. Maybe I live a sheltered life.
     
  3. RyeThomas

    RyeThomas ArboristSite Operative

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    Never heard of Bradley, I will says as noted above that's a low price for the machine with a 4 way standard. Not much info out there that I could find.
    Kinetic is more money and a different machine all together. I would do my research if you start really looking at going that route.
    It's a tough call, I just went through the same delima. Read lots and good luck.
     
  4. Streblerm

    Streblerm Addicted to ArboristSite

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  5. NGaMountains

    NGaMountains ArboristSite Operative

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  6. mesupra

    mesupra Mainer

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    Not sure I would like the idea of having the wedge attached to the cylinder. A stationary wedge seems to be more productive. If you can afford a kinetic splitter I would not hesitate however the initial cost is often times twice as much. Few people around here running the DR with very good results. I know of at least one guy who makes a living off his.
     
  7. sunfish

    sunfish Fish Head

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    After running a Super Split J model for over 6 years, I'll never own another splitter.
     
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  8. Kevin in Ohio

    Kevin in Ohio Addicted to ArboristSite

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    To me a major factor is what size stuff you are normally dealing with and the length. The kinetics work great on smaller diameter and shorter lengths. I have used them and liked them on that stuff. Bigger stuff, not so much. What I would suggest to to find a member close to you with a kinetic and see if they would be willing to let you try it out with the wood you normally deal with. For their time you could leave the wood if they wanted and you'd have a real world test that would answer your questions.

    I always thought on a commercial setting a hydraulic to chunk up the biggins' and a kinetic to finish them off would be ideal.Multi man op for sure. Big time users would probably just go with a processor like a Cord King. Those things make my drool! I'm just doing my own, sometimes by myself so I have to go with what works best for me.
     
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  9. RyeThomas

    RyeThomas ArboristSite Operative

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    Very good idea above.
    I asked and read lots before I purchased my SS. I called and talked to Paul and he opened his Rolodex and found a customer about an hour from me and was willing to call them and see if I could drop by and see it. I decided after a few e-mails and speaking to them that was the route I was going to take and didn't bother going to check it out.
    So there may be someone near you. I'm by no means pushing a SS, just saying it would be pretty nice if your on the fence to go see a Kinetic.
    Mine should be here next week. I will add my name to the list of people that are open for others to come by and check it out.

    After all these things are a fortune so you better get what you want the first time.

    I wonder what the cycle time of the Bradley is and how big the hydraulic tank is? Reguardless thats a lot for a low price.

    Again good luck.

    Have a great weekend Gents.
     
  10. Sandhill Crane

    Sandhill Crane AS Member

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    Interesting having four people going in on the purchase.
    I would break it down a little further than hydraulic vs kinetic.

    There are several styles in the hydraulic splitter category, typically based on wedge style, but not entirely.
    Horizontal/vertical, which are wedge on cylinder rod.
    Horizontal, wedge on beam. (options: tow from different ends, often higher beams, log lifts, four/six way wedges, disappearing four-way wedges that drop below the beam)
    Horizontal, wedge on ram. (dual split, log lifts)
    Horizontal, box wedge. (Tempest is a brand comes to mind, dual action)
    Raised Vertical. (PowerSplit style with wedge on ram;options as four-way wedge, log lift, self propelled models, and integrated conveyor)

    The kinetics are pretty much one style, the difference being up to now, two things: dependability, and single vs two handed activation.
    Without exception, the kinetic splitters have narrow cutting wedges. (Hydraulic wedge design is all over the place. Dual split wedges being knife like. Timberwolf is the opposite, with an extremely fat wedge. There are combination wedges that are narrow with a wide flare to cut and pop splits.)
    There are some option differences among kinetics.
    Towing, lower center of gravity, manual log lifts, brand of power units, including electric powered.

    I would pay less attention to tonnage claims, and more attention to what your splitting dictates (size of rounds) and how you work. An example would be taking the splitter to the wood, or the wood to the splitter, then ergonomics as in a tip-up horizontal/vertical, log lift, or neither and noodle the few rounds that may need it. The kinetics are very ergonomic with the added height and especially the table for re-splitting, but not all of them tow well. Towing may be a factor for you with four owners. I suspect most kinetics would need to be trailered for road travel.

    If the kinetic is still on your list, call Paul at SuperSplit and ask if he can give you a name of someone close to you that has one that you can contact via email or perhaps personally, to check see if it is still a fit or not. I did that several years ago before buying, contacting an owner by phone. You are welcome to try mine, a three year old SS-HD, but it is probably a three hour drive for you one way. I suspect many, like myself, who have moved to kinetics, previously used hydraulic splitter and kept them. I upgraded to a hydraulic with log lift, but the really large dia. wood supply is no longer available, and the unit sits mostly unused as I prefer to use the SS for most wood.

    I'm sure others can add more to the style and differences in both types.
    Just read the last two posts that came up, so double coverage on some stuff. Kevin in Ohio did a wonderful job of pulling several styles together in to a beautiful custom splitter build tailored to his wood supply and how he works.
     
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  11. ChoppyChoppy

    ChoppyChoppy Addicted to ArboristSite

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    That red one, how can it have 12-15 hrs but look brand new?

    Those fenders I'd rip off after the first 30 seconds. I used a Troy Built with fenders like that, I still have scars on my shins from those things and that was 4 tears ago!
     
  12. The Diesel

    The Diesel ArboristSite Lurker

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    My brother and uncle have their own log splitters at their house but this one would be at the farm we all hunt where most of the splitting happens. My brother and uncle heat their houses with wood. We heat our hunting cabin with wood and I burn a couple two tree chords in the fireplace at my house.

    I am not sure if it will get split 4 ways, I am just tired of the slow ass splitter we have so was going to buy a new one myself and surprise everyone. It all comes out in wash so not worried about it.

    Would be cool to bring one of the kinetic out there and surprise everyone with the speed. I dont think they even know they kinetic exist. Would back fire on me if it wont split the oak and red elm. My uncle is especially hard on equipment.

    Thanks for the input. I am gonna see if I can find a SS around here to try.
     
  13. clogsplit

    clogsplit ArboristSite Lurker

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    Have you seen the Split Second kinetic log splitters made right here in Illinois? You could go look at their website, plenty of videos and pretty much same as super split. They also have accessories like a manual log lift and cover that are quite nice. I would bet they would demo one for you guys anytime, since your in Illinois. I remember them doing some charity splits in Iowa for fun and there might be others on here that remember that. Good luck in your search.
     
  14. The Diesel

    The Diesel ArboristSite Lurker

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    I checked on that. That is a new one not the demo you would get.
     
  15. CaseyForrest

    CaseyForrest I am NOT a tree freak.

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    I just got my sshd a couple weeks ago. So far the only thing it's coughed at is a load of unknown elm. But everything else I've thrown at it, no problem. Even crotches and knots, it just slices right through them. The elm it will split no problem as long as the rounds aren't to large, or I noodle the larger pieces. Then it cuts those too. And I say cut because it doesn't really split wood, it cuts it.

    You can come try mine as well. I have plenty of different types of wood you can get a feel for.

    sent from a field
     
  16. Sawyer Rob

    Sawyer Rob Addicted to ArboristSite

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    That's ABSOLUTELY been MY experience, I'll NEVER go back to a wedge on the cylinder type splitter!

    SR
     
  17. The Diesel

    The Diesel ArboristSite Lurker

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    Why is that? i assume its harder in cylinder because of pressure to move to the side. wouldn't the wedge have to be on the cylinder if the splitter can be used vertical?
     
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  18. Oldmaple

    Oldmaple Addicted to ArboristSite

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    That was my thought, the vertical ones always have the wedge on the cylinder.
     
  19. NSMaple1

    NSMaple1 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Hydro guy here, always will be. A h/v one. It will handle the big & uglies, and I hate noodling. And I'm at the stage where a super fast cycle time would be wasted on me - I'd wear myself out if I tried to keep it working.

    Also prefer wedge on ram - the wood stays in one place until you get it split small enough, no moving it back to the beam for resplitting.

    As usual, different strokes...
     
  20. Kevin in Ohio

    Kevin in Ohio Addicted to ArboristSite

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    That is my situation too. I always hated having to try to pull all the big stuff back. Some like the fixed wedge as once it is split to final size, they can just push it away and be done. Huge multi wedges are key here but I don't like those because they make too many small slivers? more pieces to handle if you will. I don't mind handling a small/finished piece on the ground to the sides or onto a conveyor. If in the woods, throwing to the sides and keep backing down the logs length to split. When done, back the truck and load from both sides with NO steps if you move the truck. With my splitter design, Wedge on ram keeps the suspended/leftrd round from swinging back because the whole round has to move. Wedge on the ram just works for what I have.

    Everything has it's good and bad points. Just weigh your options and see what works best for your set up as you say.

    [​IMG]

    This is by far the easiest way to work up big stuff for me.
     
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