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Looking for saw options on Alaskan mill

jeffc

jeffc

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Sep 18, 2013
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Pa
I have a fairly large sized pile of hardwood logs that are primarily used as firewood. I'm looking to get an Alaskan mill setup in order to harvest some of that wood for other uses, like lumber for a garage, furniture, etc.

The logs range in species from hickory, oak, maple and poplar. Size range from 12" to 30"+, which are typically poplar. I do have some oak that is over 30" as well. My primary saw is a 562xp, which seems a little under powered for milling according to some opinions online.

I'm not interested in smoking my favorite saw, so what are my best options? If 60cc is too small, what is the right sized saw and bar? Is there any real difference in rip chains?
 
piscesfitzy

piscesfitzy

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May 7, 2012
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59
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Waterford Ireland
I have a fairly large sized pile of hardwood logs that are primarily used as firewood. I'm looking to get an Alaskan mill setup in order to harvest some of that wood for other uses, like lumber for a garage, furniture, etc.

The logs range in species from hickory, oak, maple and poplar. Size range from 12" to 30"+, which are typically poplar. I do have some oak that is over 30" as well. My primary saw is a 562xp, which seems a little under powered for milling according to some opinions online.

I'm not interested in smoking my favorite saw, so what are my best options? If 60cc is too small, what is the right sized saw and bar? Is there any real difference in rip chains?
088 or ms880 with 42" bar
 
IyaMan

IyaMan

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If wanting to stay with Husky, then 390xp or 395xp would be a pretty solid base for such wood, or a Jonsered 2188 (essentially the same saw as 390xp). A 36" bar and 30" mill would probably handle most of what you have (If cutting off the rounded edges on a 34" log, you need only about a 30" mill). But of course, going bigger in both engine/saw and with bar/mill will only allow for more possibilities (like a 3120 or a Stihl 880).

Could be worth checking the Trading Post forum if looking to get such a saw second hand, especially if you only intend to use it for milling, or put up your own post seeking such a saw.

Though understand, milling can be a slow-going and tiresome process, but it is also equally (or more so) rewarding in the results. And dried-out wood is not as good for milling as the more freshly cut stuff, so do consider that with what's in your wood pile
 
jeffc

jeffc

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Joined
Sep 18, 2013
Messages
89
Location
Pa
If wanting to stay with Husky, then 390xp or 395xp would be a pretty solid base for such wood, or a Jonsered 2188 (essentially the same saw as 390xp). A 36" bar and 30" mill would probably handle most of what you have (If cutting off the rounded edges on a 34" log, you need only about a 30" mill). But of course, going bigger in both engine/saw and with bar/mill will only allow for more possibilities (like a 3120 or a Stihl 880).

Could be worth checking the Trading Post forum if looking to get such a saw second hand, especially if you only intend to use it for milling, or put up your own post seeking such a saw.

Though understand, milling can be a slow-going and tiresome process, but it is also equally (or more so) rewarding in the results. And dried-out wood is not as good for milling as the more freshly cut stuff, so do consider that with what's in your wood pile
Great info, thanks!

I'll lurk around the trading post to see what I can find. I'm not in a huge hurry, so I can be picky.

I wasn't sure how this process would go as far as time is concerned. Given that I do most projects around the house, I'm not terribly concerned with that, as long as I'm not breaking saws :/ Most of what I harvest will be dimensional lumber from tulip poplars for a new garage, maybe even for a tree house.
 
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