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Modifications you really like/or things you tried that didn't work out.

SS396driver

SS396driver

To much wood
Joined
Nov 3, 2011
Messages
1,860
Location
Catskill Mountains NY
Hey, can we get more pics of that? I'd love to do something similar.
This is my build tread instead of reposting the pics.
https://www.arboristsite.com/community/threads/log-arch-build.339958/

I used it the first time in the field worked great . Only thing I have to do is wire a #2 wire from one of the trucks batteries to the trailer. With a quick disconnect ,after multiple pulls the 10k winch started to drain the deep cycle on the trailer even with the truck running. The charging wire in the 7 pin isnt made to jump only trickle charge. I just used a set of regular jumpers and it worked fine. No problem getting some good sized logs into the trailer 20200222_113048.jpg 20200222_113050.jpg
 
Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Crane

AS Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2010
Messages
2,540
Location
Saugatuck, Michigan
Wet, wet spring last year in S.W. Michigan.
Again thinking of a fabric shelter, like ShelterLogic brand, for a splitting shed.
Maybe 20'w or 22'w x 24'l x 12'h without end panels.
I called on 'bin blocks', stackable concrete blocks 2'w x 2'h x 6'l and was surprised how inexpensive they are. Didn't get a full quote with delivery, but certainly doable.
Elevating a shelter two rows of bin blocks, or 4', would allow me to T the conveyor out the side, under the hoop frame work, and load log decks from both ends.
If elevated, the hoop structure could be reduced to 9' high, plus the bin blocks, for plenty of chain saw/gas engine exhaust ventilation.
By keeping it wide, the trailer for bark, and bin for junk wood could be kept easily accessible, inside.
Another plus is it is all movable and temporary is something changes.
IMG_4703.jpg IMG_7965.jpg
 
SS396driver

SS396driver

To much wood
Joined
Nov 3, 2011
Messages
1,860
Location
Catskill Mountains NY
Wet, wet spring last year in S.W. Michigan.
Again thinking of a fabric shelter, like ShelterLogic brand, for a splitting shed.
Maybe 20'w or 22'w x 24'l x 12'h without end panels.
I called on 'bin blocks', stackable concrete blocks 2'w x 2'h x 6'l and was surprised how inexpensive they are. Didn't get a full quote with delivery, but certainly doable.
Elevating a shelter two rows of bin blocks, or 4', would allow me to T the conveyor out the side, under the hoop frame work, and load log decks from both ends.
If elevated, the hoop structure could be reduced to 9' high, plus the bin blocks, for plenty of chain saw/gas engine exhaust ventilation.
By keeping it wide, the trailer for bark, and bin for junk wood could be kept easily accessible, inside.
Another plus is it is all movable and temporary is something changes.
View attachment 801790 View attachment 801791
I got one of their garages was given to me . It was almost brand new friend bought it to store furniture during a remodel .Not all that impressed with it very cheap and certainly would not use it in winter . I only plan to use it during the summer . I researched portable garages and I think I'm going to get it since it's on sale and I can pick it up in Connecticut. No shipping
https://rhinoshelters.com/product/12w-x-24l-x-8h-round-style/

12’W-x-24’L-x-8’H-Round-Style-featured-image.jpg
 
Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Crane

AS Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2010
Messages
2,540
Location
Saugatuck, Michigan
Cold and windy February 28, spots of delicious sunshine.
I have two tables set up in the garage to cut a 40' x 60' tarp into 6' x 5' pieces for pallet covers. Gives me 80 pieces, four per cord, or 20 cord.
Once cut in 6' wide multiple layer folded strips 40' long, then cut double layer the other way, 5', and then the corners are folded and stitched so I can get my hand through the tunnel of the corner and pull bailing twine.
I've done these for a few years now, to keep leaves, rain, and snow off. Mainly autumn leaves that build up, and get repeatedly wet, holding moisture. The leaves do the same thing on the pallets themselves, keeping the bottom layer of wood in contact with the pallets from drying out well.
What doesn't work is the covers UV fatigue in two years time. Last summer I threw out 150+ covers. Thus the need to redo more.
A 40' x 60' tarp is about $180. divided by 80 pieces is $2.25 ea. or $9.00/cord/2 yrs use = $4.50/cord. (for black side up)
I'm doing grey side up this time, and hope to get another seasons use out of them, or $3.00/cord, and much less going to the landfill.
We are presently burning junk wood for ourselves. This wood was palletized and bundled, but not covered. It is one year old, grey, patina, and full of leaves. Much of the punky edges are soaked like a sponge. Got wet, stayed wet, froze, and thawed, wet, when brought in the garage for the nights burn. The junk is getting covered as well from now on.
So it works, and doesn't work as far as expense and short life line. IMG_2608.jpg IMG_2609.jpg IMG_2610.jpg IMG_2611.jpg IMG_2603.jpg IMG_2605.jpg IMG_5610.jpg IMG_1624.jpg IMG_0400.jpg
 

sb47

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Jun 14, 2011
Messages
4,964
Location
Texas
Cold and windy February 28, spots of delicious sunshine.
I have two tables set up in the garage to cut a 40' x 60' tarp into 6' x 5' pieces for pallet covers. Gives me 80 pieces, four per cord, or 20 cord.
Once cut in 6' wide multiple layer folded strips 40' long, then cut double layer the other way, 5', and then the corners are folded and stitched so I can get my hand through the tunnel of the corner and pull bailing twine.
I've done these for a few years now, to keep leaves, rain, and snow off. Mainly autumn leaves that build up, and get repeatedly wet, holding moisture. The leaves do the same thing on the pallets themselves, keeping the bottom layer of wood in contact with the pallets from drying out well.
What doesn't work is the covers UV fatigue in two years time. Last summer I threw out 150+ covers. Thus the need to redo more.
A 40' x 60' tarp is about $180. divided by 80 pieces is $2.25 ea. or $9.00/cord/2 yrs use = $4.50/cord. (for black side up)
I'm doing grey side up this time, and hope to get another seasons use out of them, or $3.00/cord, and much less going to the landfill.
We are presently burning junk wood for ourselves. This wood was palletized and bundled, but not covered. It is one year old, grey, patina, and full of leaves. Much of the punky edges are soaked like a sponge. Got wet, stayed wet, froze, and thawed, wet, when brought in the garage for the nights burn. The junk is getting covered as well from now on.
So it works, and doesn't work as far as expense and short life line. View attachment 802089 View attachment 802091 View attachment 802092 View attachment 802093 View attachment 802094 View attachment 802095 View attachment 802101 View attachment 802103 View attachment 802105
I wish they made UV protected tarps at a reasonable price. They don't hardly last a year down here in the sun.
I stack my wood in rows 4 feet tall and stack it on treated 4x4's. I tried using free pallets but they to only last about a year and I got tired of collecting them and burning the rotted ones leaving behind piles of rusted nails.
The treated 4x4's work great and last a long time. I cut them in 20'' lengths and put some down cross ways and put the longer 4x4's on top so the wood sits about 6 to 8 inches above the ground. Only the little short ones are actually touching the ground. I get a lot of them used from a fence company where they were used as fence post and rotted off at ground level. I don't cover all my wood but I do cover some of it. I found that sheet metal works best for covering my stacks. They shed water well and don't hold moisture and they act like little ovens when the sun heats them up in the summer. They also don't promote mold and mildew. Same with the treated 4x4's. If I use pallet wood the mold and fungus attacks the pallets and then the wood stack. With treated wood mold and mildew is not an issue. I would do it differently if I had a fork lift to move the pallets around and load pallet and all on a truck and just let the pallet go with the wood. But you gotta work with what you got.
 
Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Crane

AS Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2010
Messages
2,540
Location
Saugatuck, Michigan
Making the pallet covers involved cutting the material down and folding the pieces for the next step, which is sewing the corners for bailing twine to hold them in place on the wood stacks for a year. Other than mice chewing a few of the twine cords this has worked out well for anchoring. I cut a 16' piece of twine and put a loop in one end. The end is placed over a vertical pipe clamp on one end of an 8' trailer, and a half wrap around another at the opposite end, and back two feet where I loop knot it. And a figure eight in the end to keep from freying. The second loop allows me to cinch and slip knot when fastening, getting things snug around the top of the stack. Easy on, easy off, which allows me to reuse the twine as well.
Yesterday I discovered I could make some folds, sew two corners, flip it, and sew the other two corners, without unfolding the entire piece. IMG_2615.jpg
 
cantoo

cantoo

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Messages
4,439
Age
57
Location
North of Goderich, Ontario, Canada
Website
Visit site
Sandhill, I bought a skid of pallet covers at an auction last year. They are a variety of sizes and we use them to cover everything from my Steiners, bandmill, firewood, sleds and other stuff. There is no name on them and I bet they were pretty expensive to buy new. They kind of look like these. And a pic of the greenhouse I bought last year for firewood but got bad weather before I got it put up.
https://www.monotaro.sg/g/01286369/
 

Attachments

KiwiBro

KiwiBro

Mill 'em, nails be damned.
Joined
Jan 28, 2009
Messages
7,779
Location
Aotearoa
The printed PVC advertising billboards are a waste stream and cheap. They tend to last a few years. Make good tarps, etc, so should be a good option. Cover many bags at once rather than individual bags - will save a heap of time making multiple single bag covers. Just roll up the excess. Even just cutting these billboards big enough to cover just four bags at a time will save you plenty of time compared to making up individual bag covers. Most advertising billboard companies give away the ones they take down or sell 'em cheap.
 
babybart

babybart

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Dec 2, 2014
Messages
754
Location
MD
The printed PVC advertising billboards are a waste stream and cheap. They tend to last a few years. Make good tarps, etc, so should be a good option. Cover many bags at once rather than individual bags - will save a heap of time making multiple single bag covers. Just roll up the excess. Even just cutting these billboards big enough to cover just four bags at a time will save you plenty of time compared to making up individual bag covers. Most advertising billboard companies give away the ones they take down or sell 'em cheap.
A relative of my dads wife owns a billboard business, I get the tarps free and they are quite hardy. The sun makes them less pliable, but that is after a few years.
 
Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Crane

AS Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2010
Messages
2,540
Location
Saugatuck, Michigan
First tarp is almost done.
I picked up two more yesterday afternoon, last day of Menards current 11% off rebate.
Cantoo: checked out the webpage, and some others, looking at pallet covers. Most are five sided, which would hold/trap moisture.
KiwiBro: I've tried covering multiple stacks, with little success. Working alone, covering/positioning is more difficult. Harder to secure. Unsupported areas pool rain and melted snow. The melted snow refreezes, sags tarps, tears/rips, etc.
The singles work out well, but it is an added step and expense.
Three tarps after rebate, plus sales tax, $500.+, and will cover 60 cord this year, and 60 cord next year.
120 cord is 480 pallets.
Cost: $500./480 pallets = $1.04 per pallet or $4.16/cord.
 
Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Crane

AS Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2010
Messages
2,540
Location
Saugatuck, Michigan
Edit: I've made an error.
I'm getting 70 pieces per tarp, not 80.
New math.
Cost of tarp: $180.
6% sales tax: $10.80
11% rebate on $180.: $19.80
[6% sales tax of actual cost is $9.61 (Where does the additional $1.19 paid sales tax go? The difference between the actual purchase price and the rebate price.)]
$190.80 - $19.80 rebate = $171.
171/70 = $2.44/piece or $9.76/cord for 1 yr; $4.88/cord for two yrs use. $3.25/cord 3 yrs.
 
KiwiBro

KiwiBro

Mill 'em, nails be damned.
Joined
Jan 28, 2009
Messages
7,779
Location
Aotearoa
Are you placing the bags in the same spot each year? If so, how about two posts with a long bar/axle between them, with the largest billboard banner you can get your hands on rolled onto the axle, positioned at the height of each layer of bags. Just roll it in/out as you store/sell bags. Rings/eyelets down the side edge that you can hang hunks of wood/bricks/weights to to hold it down. Just a thought. No claim to it being a good one.
 
Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Crane

AS Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2010
Messages
2,540
Location
Saugatuck, Michigan
A lot of work goes into making the covers for individual stacks.
The reason I do that is because I've covered multiply pallets and racks, and it turned out to be even more work. It was also more expensive tarp wise, as one year in, they were shredded pretty bad.
I checked out rip stop nylon at a fabric shop but it cost too much. The covers are about 6' x 6' which is 4 sq. yds. ea.
I may try double stacking two high again this year, which would cut down on the number of covers needed.
IMG_0311.jpg IMG_0327.jpg IMG_0318.jpg
 

CUCV

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
May 12, 2006
Messages
597
Location
Stratham, NH
The Home Depot near me has a cull wood pile. I have slowly accumulated tons of plywood for $1 a sheet. $1 per cord and many sheets are 7 years old. I also will use them for matting on tree jobs and I can just burn them when they are at the end of their life.
I remember helping my grandmother sew canvas wood covers around 30 years ago for my parents, they still use them today. With all the effort in making them it may be worth spending twice the money to get at least twice the life.
 
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