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Tell me about Axes....

Ambull01

Ambull01

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8 pounder works best all around I keep telling them but no one listens.
8 pounder huh. I'll see if Council Tool has one vice the 6 pounder. I've been thinking about the optimum splitting height. This will vary from person to person though. Figured there's probably a general guideline of how high the round should sit. Maybe knee high or below.
 
Ambull01

Ambull01

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Optimally, the handle should be horizontal when the head strikes.
So the optimum height would depend on the person's build, technique, handle length and shape, plus something I'm sure I'm not thinking about this morning.
*
Cool, I'll test this. I was actually thinking the handle should be slight below parallel. Seems like that would give the maximum amount of force/power then returns would diminish from there. WTH do I know though, only have about a year of splitting experience lol.
 
Philbert

Philbert

Chainsaw Enthusiast
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Nov 25, 2006
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Minnesota
I've been thinking about the optimum splitting height. . . . Maybe knee high or below.
I was taught to bend my knees when I split, so my standing knee height is higher than my squatting knee height, if that makes sense. When I have a lot of wood to split, I like to have a few different height rounds to use as a splitting base, and choose, depending on the wood.

Philbert
 
Philbert

Philbert

Chainsaw Enthusiast
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Nov 25, 2006
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16,559
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Minnesota
I'm not sure of the physics (and not looking to start that again) but I am thinking that it also carries the blade of the maul/head of the sledge hammer down straight into the wood, as opposed to in an arc. The difference may be minimal in a practical sense. Anyway, it probably means that I prefer a slightly lower splitting surface than if I stood with my knees locked. I always prefer to split on a raised surface than the ground.

Philbert
 
Ambull01

Ambull01

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I was taught to bend my knees when I split, so my standing knee height is higher than my squatting knee height, if that makes sense. When I have a lot of wood to split, I like to have a few different height rounds to use as a splitting base, and choose, depending on the wood.

Philbert
Unless you're @benp (hope I did that right). That guy splits logs. He needs a tall round to stand on to split his stuff.
 
BeatCJ

BeatCJ

flat out lazy
Joined
Nov 4, 2014
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58
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SW Washington State
Now you've really made things difficult to predict.
Strange things happen to a moving object as it transitions into, an out of the speed of sound.
*
And, to add complexity, the speed of sound varies with altitude/elevation.

8 pounder huh. I'll see if Council Tool has one vice the 6 pounder. I've been thinking about the optimum splitting height. This will vary from person to person though. Figured there's probably a general guideline of how high the round should sit. Maybe knee high or below.
I agree, if you could have only one, the 8lb would probably be it. But I don't/won't have but one, I'm good with my 6lb and a handful of wedges and an ax of some sort. Works for me in my conditions and wood.
 

svk

A little bit of everything
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Oct 19, 2009
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MN
In theory I can see that hitting the split with the whole cutting edge would work best.

In practice I have had better luck with my rounds on or close to the ground. I have a big maple chopping block that is about 10" tall and then putting a 20" round on top of this still has it slightly below "optimum". But they seem to split easier.
 
Ambull01

Ambull01

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In theory I can see that hitting the split with the whole cutting edge would work best.

In practice I have had better luck with my rounds on or close to the ground. I have a big maple chopping block that is about 10" tall and then putting a 20" round on top of this still has it slightly below "optimum". But they seem to split easier.
Hmm, I was thinking hitting the split at an angle would be best lol. I have no idea why I'm spending so much freaking time breaking down the art of splitting wood. Anyway, I usually start a wedge at an angle because I feel like it goes in easier. Then I straighten it out once it enters the round. Was thinking hitting the round with a slight angle (upper portion of blade slanted down) may go into the round easier and possibly reduce the chance of the handle hitting the wood.

My knee height with shoes on is approximately 21". I've tried taller splitting platforms but feel like I lose a lot of power. Wish I could has as much enthusiasm for my real, salary earning job as I have with splitting wood
 
Chris-PA

Chris-PA

Where the Wild Things Are
Joined
Jul 9, 2011
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10,049
Location
PA
My favorite axe is a 4-1/2lb that has been sharpened a bit too much, so it has a fatter profile but also the face has become quite rounded. The thing just works. With the rounded face the angle at which it hits may be less important. Also, having the wood closer to the ground gives you a longer distance in which to swing, and therefore longer to get the tool up to speed.

I tend to do more of a knee bend when I'm splitting wood that is stringy with a sharp, narrow taper axe. Then I bend quite a bit on the last hit to pull the axe head down through the round and cut the strings against the block.
 
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benp

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Northern MN
Unless you're @benp (hope I did that right). That guy splits logs. He needs a tall round to stand on to split his stuff.
Lol..

Trust me, I've had my share of stinkers that won't budge.

I had some gnarly red maple yesterday and Saturday that was twisted. That sucked.

Always good to have more tools at your disposal.

And thanks to Zogger's video, I now want those Fiskar's mauls. I ALMOST ordered one off of the Amazon site, just to see what shipping would be.
 
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zogger

zogger

Tree Freak
Joined
Nov 23, 2010
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North Georgia
Lol..

Trust me, I've had my share of stinkers that won't budge.

I had some gnarly red maple yesterday and Saturday that was twisted. That sucked.

Always good to have more tools at your disposal.

And thanks to Zogger's video, I now want those Fiskar's mauls. I ALMOST ordered one off of the Amazon site, just to see what shipping would be.
Which one, the big momma x46? goferit! Lot of us would like to know I bet! I ain't got the loot now, but maybe next year I can afford another axe.
 
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