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What are you building with your milled wood? merged

Brian72

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Do you have details on this?
We used black walnut for the top and center support and red oak for the legs. Anything particular you'd like to know? It was a fairly quick and random project but I'll gladly answer anything I can. I may even have some other pics.

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hseII

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We used black walnut for the top and center support and red oak for the legs. Anything particular you'd like to know? It was a fairly quick and random project but I'll gladly answer anything I can. I may even have some other pics.

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Do you have a design?

Thank You.
 
NIP Group
Brian72

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Thanks. Sure appreciate the compliment. It was a fun learning experience. May take me a few days to get more pics for you. I got a different phone and need to try to get the pics transferred.

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I sent you some info in a PM. Let me know if you got it

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KiwiBro

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Lovely work, Bmac. If these joint support blocks are laminated, you matched the grain very well.
oval-table-1.jpg

Did you use a router/spindle moulder and jigs to cut the mortices in the table top?

Lovely timber too. Is that figured maple stable when dry? Any support under it? We don't get much figured maple here. I'd be a bit nervous of the ends of that maple shelf breaking along the grain if it got a knock, if I had used some of the timbers available here.
 

Bmac

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Lovely work, Bmac. If these joint support blocks are laminated, you matched the grain very well.
View attachment 634723

Did you use a router/spindle moulder and jigs to cut the mortices in the table top?

Lovely timber too. Is that figured maple stable when dry? Any support under it? We don't get much figured maple here. I'd be a bit nervous of the ends of that maple shelf breaking along the grain if it got a knock, if I had used some of the timbers available here.
Yes, those support blocks are laminated. Got lucky with how well that matched up. That is also why that joint/leg is facing outward.

Joints in the table top started out as a dado, then ran 1/2' router bit into the top and bottom of the dado. Then you cut a dado in the leg to match the tenon you created in the top and round it off with a router bit that matches the curvature left by your first rout bit. I bought these router bits together to make this joint as they compliment one another perfectly. Here's a picture of the joint deconstructed, this not my photo, and the joint on my table is more slender, but same concept.

maloof joint.jpg

I went for a more delicate look to this table, hence no stretchers under the table top. Top and bottom shelf are a full 1" thick but don't look it because I beveled the underside of each.

I don't notice a difference in stability with figured wood, just harder to work with tools and avoiding tearout. I've been saving that piece of maple for years waiting for the right project.

No cross members under the bottom shelf, hard to tell but I designed a lip within the contour of the leg that comes up under the shelf a full inch for support. Design also takes into account wood movement, wood moves across the grain, the grain on the top and the bottom shelf run the same direction and the legs should move with them both as the seasons change and the humidity changes.
 
Brian72

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Marine5068

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KiwiBro

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Cherry live edge with stainless legs. A little overbuilt but I like it that way. First table I’ve ever done and looking forward to making more! Finished with Rubio Monocoat and sprayed the bark with satin polyurethane. View attachment 638127 View attachment 638128
Nice table and metal work. That slab is a perfect candidate for a bow tie strap/spline across that crack.
 
BlackCoffin

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Nice table and metal work. That slab is a perfect candidate for a bow tie strap/spline across that crack.
I could always incinerate that later! What’s nice about the finish is you should be able to make repairs and whatnot without seeing a change in the new VS old material.
 
Mad Professor

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This is pretty crude compared to what most are posting here, but I needed a good wood rack.

I also was exploring TF scribe rule layout, and needed to practice . So I milled up some 4" X 4" white ash; logosol, 066, 63PMX chain. The PMX chain leaves a pretty smooth finish right off the mill.

Then I got out the chalkline, divider/compass, chisels, handsaws and auger. You can see the layout marks on the joints. I did not use any rulers/tapes/squares/power tools. Bottom bearing joints are shouldered mortise and tenon. You can see layout marks, every thing came out perfectly square.

The rack is about 20" X 60" X 90", holds about 10-14 days worth of wood (22" ash in pic), kindling goes on top

scb Sh M+T copy.jpg scb M +T 2 copy.jpg scb woodrck copy.jpg wood rack.jpg
 
Brian72

Brian72

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This is pretty crude compared to what most are posting here, but I needed a good wood rack.

I also was exploring TF scribe rule layout, and needed to practice . So I milled up some 4" X 4" white ash; logosol, 066, 63PMX chain. The PMX chain leaves a pretty smooth finish right off the mill.

Then I got out the chalkline, divider/compass, chisels, handsaws and auger. You can see the layout marks on the joints. I did not use any rulers/tapes/squares/power tools. Bottom bearing joints are shouldered mortise and tenon. You can see layout marks, every thing came out perfectly square.

The rack is about 20" X 60" X 90", holds about 10-14 days worth of wood (22" ash in pic), kindling goes on top

View attachment 638190 View attachment 638191 View attachment 638192 View attachment 638193
Nice job on the joints. I need to try some projects like this.

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