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What kind of wood is this?

Discussion in 'Arborist 101' started by SXL925, Dec 31, 2009.

  1. SXL925

    SXL925 ArboristSite Lurker

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    Hello, I'm new here but I have searched and come up with nothing on this one. Here's some pictures, I was told this is Bomgillian wood, but i've done searches on google and came up with nothing.

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  2. NCTREE

    NCTREE Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Looks like aspen to me.
     
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  3. pdqdl

    pdqdl Old enough to know better.

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    It looks mostly out of focus to me.

    But that definitely does not grow in our area. So I have no idea...
     
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  4. S Mc

    S Mc Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Agreeing with both gentlemen here: out of focus and a Populus sp. :)

    I would have gone into the cottonwood group rather than aspen myself. But hard to tell from the pictures.

    "Bomgillian wood"....hmmmmm...sounds colloquial.

    Sylvia
     
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  5. NCTREE

    NCTREE Addicted to ArboristSite

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  6. ATH

    ATH Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Anoher vote for aspen. The wood in the center is darker than "normal", but that is likely early stages of heart rot/decay.

    BTW...I gotta ask because it is in the picture: That is not the saw you used to cut it is it?
     
  7. SXL925

    SXL925 ArboristSite Lurker

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    Thanks for the wisdom everyone. I could have tried finding the good camera but what made me so curious is the Bomgillian... why all these people around here talk about it but there's no information about it.... Thanks!

    Definetely not the saw I used to cut it with, lmao. That would of been no fun whatsoever. Just set the chunk of wood on the workbench for the lighting.
     
  8. bigtreeguy

    bigtreeguy ArboristSite Lurker

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    It looks like Poplar sp.to me also. The dark wood is likely from a fungus.........that probably killed the tree from the looks of it.
     
  9. Hotrod_Heart

    Hotrod_Heart New Member

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    Yes, i would have to agree with Bob on this one, And Btw i found out tonight that Bomgillian Is just Native tounge For us Northern Mn Norwegian Folk, also and another slang term for it, Is Sour poplar the woods just north of the farm is full of this crap wood. A way to tell the difference between "sour" poplar and "regular" poplar is the greyish bark color and the dark scarring of the tree.:clap:
     
  10. SXL925

    SXL925 ArboristSite Lurker

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    AHHHH Icicicic, very very interesting. Thanks for everyone's help!
     
  11. Ann stone

    Ann stone New Member

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    It is boxelder. My stepdad calls it bomgillian too. We just cut a tree that looks exactly like this!
     
  12. Woody912

    Woody912 ArboristSite Guru

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    I really do not think so. I vote aspen or cottonwood
     
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  13. no tree to big

    no tree to big Addicted to ArboristSite

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    It's defiantly not box elder! See the diamond shaped lenticles on the bark, that is poplar all day long! The aspen I've seen have a bit more white in the bark then what is pictured so id lean more towards a young white poplar https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Populus_alba

    So these things are not native to the United States? Somebody played a cruel joke on us cause these things suck, haha.

    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
     
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  14. ATH

    ATH Addicted to ArboristSite

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    That first picture has some pinkish that could lead to a boxelder guess. And perhaps if that is another name for boxelder. But the rest of those pictures are most certainly not boxelder...
     
  15. old CB

    old CB ArboristSite Operative

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    Pretty sure that's Balm of Gilead, or Balsam Poplar. Which would account for people calling it "Bomgillian."
     
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  16. ATH

    ATH Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Great call. I bet you are spot on with that name! Never heard it before, but makes perfect sense.
     
  17. old CB

    old CB ArboristSite Operative

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    It's been a long time since I lived in the northeast, but Balm of Gilead is a lesser-known poplar. You don't see it often. It has some medicinal properties, which make it important in the herbal world. For the rest of us, it's just poplar.
     

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