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Humboldt or non Humboldt.

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by 056 kid, Oct 21, 2007.

  1. 056 kid

    056 kid Addicted to ArboristSite

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    So i recently started using the humboldt notch and it has really grown on me. i like how the wood falls out of the notch and also the log gets a little extra butt. I know this is really a regional thing but i want to know who likes to use it and what everyone thinks of it. Same with the conventional,(east of the rockies) notch.
     
  2. IchWarriorMkII

    IchWarriorMkII AboristSite Guru

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    I can't get the slope cut to line up for shat with a humboldt. Granted, its all about experience, but the conventional cut was easier (still a challenge) to get lined up.
     
  3. sILlogger

    sILlogger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    considering when i'm cutting i cut everything low to the ground i don't have room to cut a humbolt...but i will use it sometimes on doubles that im cutting higher or a tree that im cutting high because it is rotten or something...and occasionally one a tree on a hill in which im cutting up higher on the downhill side..but for prolly 98% of the time i use a conventional. typically don't need that big of a notch anyway
     
  4. 056 kid

    056 kid Addicted to ArboristSite

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    hills

    I would be so luckey to ever get a flat track so humboldt just seems more sensible. i would say that my notches dont ever exceed 25 degrees.
     
  5. Tree Sling'r

    Tree Sling'r ArboristSite.com Sponsor

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    I will bet you a $100 bill I can make just as low if not lower of a stump using a Humboldt even with the 3/4 wraps than the conventional fellas. Yours or anyone eles. Not being arrogrant, just the way it is. Everyone thinks that Humboldt's are for high stumps, not at all.
    Long bars, big dawgs and in my case lot's of back barring.
     
  6. sILlogger

    sILlogger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    oo...yea..it can definitely be done.. but when i cut a stump 1"-2" off the ground it doesn't leave much room..but i know it can be done. btw..ive seen your pics and watched a few of your vids and i def. respect your cutting..you are great at what u do.
     
  7. sILlogger

    sILlogger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    btw..just to add to that i am pretty much a newbie when it comes to humbolts..i had never used them until i came around here..and have began to use them with increasing frequency when the need arrises.
     
  8. Tree Sling'r

    Tree Sling'r ArboristSite.com Sponsor

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    Thanks, I was more or less trying to say what you did, "It can be done." Although I like being able to make around a 10-12" stumps, it's pretty much the specs with the mills anymore.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2007
  9. 2dogs

    2dogs Addicted to ArboristSite

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    A Humboldt is pretty hard with a half wrap. I think it takes more upper body strength regardless of of 1/2, 3/4, or full wrap. I like it because it leaves a square butt log and that can mean more lumber and also I think there is less of a chance the tree will kick back over the stump. If I know my tree is going to hang up I'll use a Humboldt because I think it is easier to roll the tree off the stump. It isn't for every situation but it is another tool.

    I agree lining up the undercut takes some practice and you have to have a feel for your saw. But, if I can do it anyone can.
     
  10. Sethro

    Sethro Heathen

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    At least you don't have to dig around the stump before notching! Yet
     
  11. sILlogger

    sILlogger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    r u talking 10-12" off the ground? i suppose so..do go find myself when using a humbult that i often back bar..and when doing one close to the ground i make it shallower(flatter angle) and deeper... is this pretty well your method of a low stump humbolt?
     
  12. sILlogger

    sILlogger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    ive cut for a few people cutting walnut and really really good white oak that wanted this done...PITA...like that last 2" makes that big of a deal!!! i know i know it can!!
     
  13. Tree Sling'r

    Tree Sling'r ArboristSite.com Sponsor

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    I don't either - unless I am shoveling snow.
     
  14. Tree Sling'r

    Tree Sling'r ArboristSite.com Sponsor

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    I back some of almost every tree I cut, just depends on which side of it I am on whether it is a cut in the face or the back cut.
     
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  15. Bowtie

    Bowtie Gearhead

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    can anyone explain what a humbolt is exactly? Im curious.:confused:
     
  16. sILlogger

    sILlogger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    sling'r show him the vid of you cutting that big dougy that u posted a while back..i love that one!!!:clap:
     
  17. 056 kid

    056 kid Addicted to ArboristSite

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    back baring

    i usually dont backbar when making a humboldt. i dog in starter side up and make my flat cut. Then i back oyt of the cut, dogs still on wood. I then tilt the saw foward about 20 degrees with the bar 90 degrees to the flat cut. I then dog in again and do the same thing which completes the notch.
     
  18. Tree Sling'r

    Tree Sling'r ArboristSite.com Sponsor

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    Your undercut, what many call a notch is taken from the stump rather than the log. Look at my avatar.
     
  19. Bowtie

    Bowtie Gearhead

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    Ok, is that the same as similar to a flush stump cut for the notch? Or am I missing something?
     
  20. Tree Sling'r

    Tree Sling'r ArboristSite.com Sponsor

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    Where many of you go up with your "notch" we go under, down, hence the term undercut - the Humboldt.
     
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