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tree spikes.......

Discussion in 'Commercial Tree Care and Climbing' started by budroe69moni, May 25, 2002.

  1. budroe69moni

    budroe69moni ArboristSite Operative

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    hey guys,
    i'm looking to get a pair of climbing spikes.
    i've got a chance to do a couple of removals
    and i need to get a pair. should i get new or
    used? what should i look for????? what kind
    of boots should i get?????? thanks in advance
    to the advice!!!!!
    budroe:cool:
     
  2. treeclimber165

    treeclimber165 Member A.K.A Skwerl

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    Buckingham, Klein or Bashlin. All 3 are very good, only difference is personal preference. As with other safety gear, you need to be able to trust your LIFE on your gaffs. If you have never climbed with gaffs, I HIGHLY recommend working with someone adept with using gaffs.
    Technique is something that is easier to see than read about. About the only advice I can offer is to keep your knees out. If you try to hug the tree while climbing, you WILL kick out. I trained a guy once that I called 'Koala Bear' cause he was always hugging the tree! After he headed out on his own (cause he already knew everything) I heard that he kicked out on a palm tree and skidded 25' to the ground. I hear he's driving a tow truck now.:rolleyes:
     
  3. DDM

    DDM Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Ive heard controversy over the question of using a lanyard when spiking up a tree or just keeping hands on it during a ascent and strapping in when stopping.
    whats your opinion?:blob2:
     
  4. treeclimber165

    treeclimber165 Member A.K.A Skwerl

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    DDM- When I was at Davey, they required that you be strapped in whenever you left the ground. Sometimes it got kind of rediculous, and I bucked them at every turn. But as I get older, I'm finding myself throwing my lanyard around almost everything I gaff. At least untill I get to a bunch of forks where I have a ton of handholds and it is too cumbersome to hook and unhook the lanyard. I probably average about 10% of a typical ascent without being strapped in. I'm not talking about what I SHOULD do, just how I do it.
    I believe a climber should be strapped to the tree as much as possible. We always look for the 'weak link' which is most likely to fail. What happens when that 'weak link' is our own grip? I certainly trust my gear more than my own physical grip. My grip has failed me in the past, my lanyard and lifeline have never failed.
     
  5. rbtree

    rbtree Addicted to ArboristSite

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    DDM,

    That's what a second lanyard or lifeline is for, so you can conform to ANSI guidelines of always being tied in when over 12-15 feet off the ground.

    That is not to say yours truly has never free climbed a tree, say a conifer with a full canopy, or a 5.5 rock face ( .5 pts below my ability level; while Peter Croft and John Bachar free solo 2000+ foot walls rated at 5.11!!--but that is for fun not werk, huh!!)
     
  6. Treeman14

    Treeman14 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I'd have to vote for the Bashlin aluminums, if you can afford them. They're light and comfortable. I use the big velcro pads, too. The Talon Climbers look comfortable for those all-day jobs, but I don't know anyone who has them.
    Using a lanyard while ascending allows you to lean back to a safer positon. If you're free climbing, you have a tendency to get closer to the tree, which increases the chance of kicking out.

    Like Brian said, get some training and practice BEFORE using them on a job.
     
  7. John Paul Sanborn

    John Paul Sanborn Above average climber

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    The Geckos are a very good, light weight gaff. Every one who used them has given high marks.

    I use Wolf's Love then. I got bad ankles and they give all around support. Some say they are too heavy, but you dont need logger heels to stay in them, so it ballences out. And the gaff adujusts hight easily. Just don't get the ratchet strapd, get the buckles. The ratchets are finicky.
     
  8. treeman82

    treeman82 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I use the Buckinghams. I would suggest to you that you get a pair with the off-set gaffs. I believe the Kleins are really good with their off-set gaffs (from what I have heard). Definatley get the big velcro pads. My pads have a piece of steel in them, anybody who has used them and then used the non-steel ones has commented that mine are better. I wear a pair of Red-Wing logger boots for using gaffs and doing all around work, they take some getting used to with the big heel, but after that they are very comfortable.
     
  9. Jumper

    Jumper Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I think the type you get is a matter of personal preference......see if you can borrow a set to give them a try. As for boots, you then to get what you pay for......I think the purpose of the logger heel is to hold the bottom of the appartus in place, some such as Wescos are reinforced in this area. I also find that I high heel means you can walk around on the ground without the gaffs digging so much into the soil and tripping you up as they would on a pair of boots with a lower heel. My two cents worth as I am new to this as well.
     
  10. Kevin

    Kevin Addicted to ArboristSite

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    My choice would be a set with interchangeable gaffs.
     
  11. Toddppm

    Toddppm Addicted to ArboristSite

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    ........and get NEW ones! You never know if used ones are sharpened incorrectly or been dropped and could have stress cracks or something. Nothing like piece of mind knowing how a piece of equipment has been treated.
     
  12. John Paul Sanborn

    John Paul Sanborn Above average climber

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    New is cheap insurance.
     
  13. Tom Dunlap

    Tom Dunlap Addicted to ArboristSite

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    The current Z133 regs state that any time a person leaves the ground they SHALL be secured from falling. That means a lanyard or rope.

    Tom
     
  14. DDM

    DDM Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Secured from Falling? Does Sliding Count?
    :D
     
  15. murphy4trees

    murphy4trees Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Doing an AJ web search under tree service, I came upon the following piece from Harold McPeak's Tree Service. It would be laughable if the results weren't so painful.


    According to Harold: "Spikes do not hurt your tree if you have the right kind and someone who knows how to use them. Whoever invented bucket trucks probably started the rumor that spikes hurt your trees so they could eliminate the little man because they (the tree services that bought the trucks) had to make a killing in order to pay for the equipment.
    Now that you are enlightened about tree services, I hope you make the enlightened choice."


    Makes my stomach turn.
    God Bleess All,
    Daniel
     
  16. DDM

    DDM Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I Found a few more interesting Facts There ! :D
    * Don't be fooled by a smooth line, a great smile, and a charming personality. Some people doing tree work have no clue what they're doing. Others will take you for a ride, charging ridiculous prices while maintaining an overly cocky attitude.

    * Speaking from experience, it is very rare to find a tree company that has a sober climber. This is yet another area that puts us above our competition.

    Now that you are enlightened about tree services, I hope you make the enlightened choice.
     
  17. treeclimber165

    treeclimber165 Member A.K.A Skwerl

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  18. Tim Walsh

    Tim Walsh ArboristSite Member

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    You are not quoting the current ANSI Z133.1 -2000 Standard, see below:

    9.1.2 Arborists shall be tied-in or secured while ascending the tree and remain tied-in or secured until the work is completed and they have returned to the ground. EXCEPTION:
    (1) While ascending a ladder to gain access to a tree, however, arborists shall not work from or leave the ladder until they are tied-in or secured.
    (2) While ascending a tree where the density of branches growing from the stem prevents the arborist from crotching the arborist climbing line or work positioning lanyard through the branches, then and only then, is the three-point climbing technique acceptable.


    Thanks,

    TMW
     
  19. Dave

    Dave AboristSite Guru

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    Well, let's see now, I guess I'll reply in descending order. Tim, have you seen the ISA ad in the June TCI (p. 65) ? Our boy is working from his climb line, 020T spewing out real chips, hardhat and eye protection in place, flipline........oooh, kinda looks like he forgot to clip in or maybe he's hooked up below his feet ????? What happened to having two tie-ins when running a saw? As for Mcpeak, AAAAAAGGGGRRHHHHH!!!!!!!!!:blob2: There, I feel much better now, where was I ? Oh yeah, Budroe- my personal choice- Bashlins with the huge leather pads, Wesco Highliners which are made with an extra half sole for support, but with the lug Vibram sole for limb walking.
     
  20. Tim Walsh

    Tim Walsh ArboristSite Member

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    Dave,

    Good eye on the ISA ad, I contacted them last week about it. Many adds use old pictures, and not everyone looks as closely as we do.

    There are 2 violations in the add and possibly a third:

    1. Not double tied using a chain saw.
    2. Non-locking snap on lanyard

    3 (iffy) thumb and forfinger of both hands not completely wrapped on handle.

    Thanks,

    TMW
     

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