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Are "chainsaw gloves" really just gentleman's driving gloves?

glenintenn

glenintenn

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Got a pair of Oregon chainsaw gloves. Two weeks later, right hand index finger destroyed ... no abuse, just cutting, throwing, stacking wood ... seemingly normal behavior for firewood cutting. I did get a warranty replacement from Oregon (very responsive, very friendly) but ... it seems that these gloves are made for driving... only (chainsaws? SMART cars? )

oregongloves_usecases.jpg
 
turnkey4099

turnkey4099

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I use the "Nitrile" utility gloves for everything. Thin enough to change chains on a saw and will outlast any leather glove I have ever used pitching wood around. Usually $3.xx for 3 pair at Wal Mart. Some people say they make their hands sweat. They do on the new gloves but wear them a cou-ple times and that stops.
 
CentaurG2

CentaurG2

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Good old Atlas 300 blue make a great chainsaw glove. They hold up well to just about anything except ropes. Buy em by the dozen online. Wash them when they get wonky. If you want some protection from a chainsaw chain, buy one size larger than you normally do and wear them over your chainsaw gloves.

Atlas 380 gloves are excellent for automotive or anything requiring high degree of dexterity. They also make a good driving glove or gas pump glove.
 
LondonNeil

LondonNeil

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As Philbert says, injuries to the back of the left hand are a something like the third most common location for a chainsaw injury (us forestry analysis I believe) . Hence Kevlar wading on the back of the left hand. The rest of the glove is just for comfort. I tend to swap into a pair of leather work gloves to lob logs and bucked rounds around, then pop the chainsaw gloves back on before starting the saw again. My gloves seem fine still and I'm into my 6th year cutting firewood.
 

sb47

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I have yet to find a pair of gloves I can't destroy in a few weeks or even days. So I only wear them for heat and cold protection. Otherwise I don't wear them. Ride a motorcycle with leather gloves and you will get blisters in a few hours. I wear a breathable cotton glove for riding.You don't need a glove to protect your hands from the bars, it's for when you fall off to protect your hands when you put them down to break your fall. If you have ever crashed a bike and fell off you know exactly what I'm talking about.
 
Philbert

Philbert

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Another type of 'protective glove' for chainsaw use are the anti-vibration ('A/V') gloves. Some people develop symptoms after extended chainsaw use, or have problems using a chainsaw, due to other vibration exposure. Here are a couple of related A.S. threads on this topic:



More threads on this topic if you search (via Google).

Philbert
 
JeffHK454

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'Chainsaw protective gloves' typically have some material similar to chaps, at least on the back of the left hand (sometimes both hands). They should provide enough dexterity to operate the saw controls.

They are not designed to stand up to the abrasion of handling firewood.

Philbert
Interesting , why would the back of your left hand be so susceptible to getting into the chain? Is this for people who think running a saw one handed is a good idea?
 
Philbert

Philbert

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People who do not wrap the thumb of their left hand around the top handle have a good chance of it slipping off during a kick-back.

But also the one-handed sawing thing.

The right hand 'should' be on the rear handle, and harder to cut.

Some gloves have the protective material in the back of both gloves.

Philbert
 
glenintenn

glenintenn

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let's see how the White Ox does ... before/after the driving gloves...

https://www.westernglovestore.com/products/1016-white-ox

prior to the Driving Glove experience, I'd had these $5.98 goatskin jobs from BigBox Depot ... they lasted a year. I'm linking them here so they don't barf marketing on the forum.

p.s. I have no relationship to the above vendor(s). The price of the Oregon gloves was a bit ridiculous (ok, I was triggered by the inverse relationship of price to longevity). They and their vendor were kind and friendly so I can't say bad things but I need something different than their offering. I have no sawvibe issues. According to the lawyers in Californicated lawyerdom: "The most frequent chainsaw injuries occur to the left leg and the back of the left hand. These injuries are usually related to kickback and losing control of the saw." That last sentence catches the eye.
 
Mustang71

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I really never wear gloves at work or at home. My exception is firewood. Mainly because most of the trees I cut have poison ivy vines on them or when bringing in wood in the winter theres a good amount of bees hibernating in the wood. Most gloves I have used dont last but I have a specific set that are your basic rubber on one side and knit on the other but are insulated cold weather gloves and they still look new. They are warm, too warm most of the time. Usually I'll cut then put them on, move some wood, and take them off. They are awesome gloves and are a few years old. Someone gave them to me who worked for GM or something at some job I did.
 
Cowboy254

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Another type of 'protective glove' for chainsaw use are the anti-vibration ('A/V') gloves. Some people develop symptoms after extended chainsaw use, or have problems using a chainsaw, due to other vibration exposure. Here are a couple of related A.S. threads on this topic:



More threads on this topic if you search (via Google).

Philbert

You're a treasure trove of knowledge, Philbert. Vibration is the number one reason I wear gloves (though there are other good reasons too). Mine are moderately cheap $8 leather things that last maybe 15 days cutting and manual splitting and throwing. Once I was wearing a pair of the same glove where the index finger had worn through on the right hand. Didn't think much of it but after two hours of bear finger on the trigger of the 661, that index finger was numb and it took an entire MONTH for sensation to come back. I haven't had problems with it since but I always wear gloves (without holes) when cutting now. Though they're not top quality, they are enough to stop me having problems.
 
foeke

foeke

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Now a month ago, a big branch landed on my arm.
I was so lucky I wore double layers sweater and thermo shirt. And gloves!
Half my arm was bruised, and my hand got between the branch and rear handle.
Surgeon was surprised my hand was as good as it was, considering all the soft tissue that was damaged. If I didn't have gloves on, the bone could have been glued together without an operation.
 
turnkey4099

turnkey4099

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You're a treasure trove of knowledge, Philbert. Vibration is the number one reason I wear gloves (though there are other good reasons too). Mine are moderately cheap $8 leather things that last maybe 15 days cutting and manual splitting and throwing. Once I was wearing a pair of the same glove where the index finger had worn through on the right hand. Didn't think much of it but after two hours of bear finger on the trigger of the 661, that index finger was numb and it took an entire MONTH for sensation to come back. I haven't had problems with it since but I always wear gloves (without holes) when cutting now. Though they're not top quality, they are enough to stop me having problems.

I have found that a wrap of gorilla tap is quite functional to cover a hole in a glove.
 
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