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Are "chainsaw gloves" really just gentleman's driving gloves?

svk

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I don’t wear gloves for anything except working with trees/wood. If I’m wrenching I’d rather have the extra feel without gloves and just wash the grease off.

I like the yellow cotton gloves for working with wood. They are cheap and last several sessions. They can be washed if they start to get rank. I bought two dozen several years back and think I probably still have 8 pairs floating around.
 
JeffHK454

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Gloves specifically for running a saw but not handling wood seem like a pain in the ass, who’s gonna cut with one pair the switch to drag brush or load rounds ?

The shop I work at goes through thousands of pairs of Kevlar cut resident poly palm gloves a year , needless to say when they get oily they just get left lay around for a new pair and I pick them up! A good soak and hand wash in Dawn dish detergent and they’re good as new.
 
Philbert

Philbert

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The shop I work at goes through thousands of pairs of Kevlar cut resident poly palm gloves a year , needless to say when they get oily they just get left lay around for a new pair and I pick them up!
Might be great gloves, but the 'cut resistance' ratings for for most work gloves (cuts with sharp glass, steel edges, knife edges, etc.) are completely different than those for chainsaw protective gloves (loose fibers pulled out to jam and stall a running saw motor). Might be interesting to try nailing a pair of those to a log and seeing how they hold up to a running chain, if you are game.



Philbert
 
JeffHK454

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Might be great gloves, but the 'cut resistance' ratings for for most work gloves (cuts with sharp glass, steel edges, knife edges, etc.) are completely different than those for chainsaw protective gloves (loose fibers pulled out to jam and stall a running saw motor). Might be interesting to try nailing a pair of those to a log and seeing how they hold up to a running chain, if you are game.



Philbert
I wasn’t thinking cut resistant gloves could stand up to a chainsaw chain , they’re just a super tough snug fitting work glove that cost me next to nothin. i Like them because they don’t kill your dexterity..you can still pick a quarter up off a concrete floor with them on...and did I say they cost me next to nothing!
 
MechanicMatt

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I like the mechanic style when riding quads, the rubber coated when splitting and pig skin when running the saw or climbing. If I had to choose just one it’d be the pig skin. Gotten too many hand injuries over the years to not wear gloves!!

would you have a one night stand without protection?? Didn’t think so, protect your hands too.
 
Philbert

Philbert

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I wasn’t thinking cut resistant gloves could stand up to a chainsaw chain , they’re just a super tough snug fitting work glove that cost me next to nothin. i Like them because they don’t kill your dexterity..you can still pick a quarter up off a concrete floor with them on...and did I say they cost me next to nothing!
Sounds like a good deal!

Philbert
 
LondonNeil

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Given that chainsaw gloves are only different from normal gloves with the wadding on the back, and any dextrous glove doesn't last long handling wood and we have various preferences, perhaps a 'hand chaps' style pad to go over another glove might be popular.
 

half

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Might be great gloves, but the 'cut resistance' ratings for for most work gloves (cuts with sharp glass, steel edges, knife edges, etc.) are completely different than those for chainsaw protective gloves (loose fibers pulled out to jam and stall a running saw motor). Might be interesting to try nailing a pair of those to a log and seeing how they hold up to a running chain, if you are game.



Philbert
 
rarefish383

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Interesting , why would the back of your left hand be so susceptible to getting into the chain? Is this for people who think running a saw one handed is a good idea?
When I was about 18-20, we had a big lot job, we took down 20 or more big Tulip Poplars. We sent a crew in with a chipper truck to clean up all the brush one day. Then I went in with a 3 man crew to cut up all of the logs into firewood. Two of us had 100CC Homelite Super 1050's with 36" bars. The third guy was a fueler. He would come around and fuel the saws as they ran, just let it idle down and step back. One of the cardinal rules of running saws was to keep your left thumb wrapped around the handle bar, if the saw kicked back, it just pushes your hand back. My hands and fingers were cramping up so bad from hours of use, that I rested my left hand on top of the handle bar, wiggling my fingers. The tip of my bar hit a log on the other side of me and shot back so fast I hardly knew it till I saw the blood. I was more afraid my Dad would be pissed that I did something that stupid, than what my knuckles looked like, I never told him I did it. I wrapped my hand up in a handkerchief and finished the job. I'm 64 and have nerve damage in both hands from the vibration. I can't snap my fingers and it's real hard to use buttons. My three fingers that got hit in the kickback start getting numb when the temp gets into the 40's, and start to turn yellow. The way I had my fingers, with my palm resting on the handle, were bent down like I was holding the handle. The chain went right across the back of 3 fingers.
 
rarefish383

rarefish383

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You're a treasure trove of knowledge, Philbert. Vibration is the number one reason I wear gloves (though there are other good reasons too). Mine are moderately cheap $8 leather things that last maybe 15 days cutting and manual splitting and throwing. Once I was wearing a pair of the same glove where the index finger had worn through on the right hand. Didn't think much of it but after two hours of bear finger on the trigger of the 661, that index finger was numb and it took an entire MONTH for sensation to come back. I haven't had problems with it since but I always wear gloves (without holes) when cutting now. Though they're not top quality, they are enough to stop me having problems.
Maybe that's why I still have nerve problems, I hate gloves, and seldom wear them. The doctors said it's common for tree guys to get the use of their hands back after a few years of not using saws. I've never quit using saws.
 
ammoaddict

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Anybody know of an all leather glove made in the US or Canada? I was going to buy some gloves from the American Glove Company, of Dallas, Oregon - but they were made in china, despite the big American flag on the Label!
That's not right when companies do that. I bought a bottle Jack once, it was it a carrying case and zip tied shut. It said Mack USA on the case and had a big American flag and a picture of the Mack bulldog on it. When I got it home and opened it up there was a tiny sticker on the bottom of the Jack that said made in China.

Sent from my moto g(7) power using Tapatalk
 
Cowboy254

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I like the mechanic style when riding quads, the rubber coated when splitting and pig skin when running the saw or climbing. If I had to choose just one it’d be the pig skin. Gotten too many hand injuries over the years to not wear gloves!!

would you have a one night stand without protection?? Didn’t think so, protect your hands too.

Well I have - but I got lucky!

But I always protect my hands, I use them more ('specially these days :( )

:laugh:
 
Philbert

Philbert

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I'm 64 and have nerve damage in both hands from the vibration.
Vibration related injuries (including: 'white finger', ' hand-arm vibration syndrome', 'Raynaud's Phenomenon', and others) are believed to be cumulative. Similar to hearing loss.

With short-term exposure, especially when younger, the symptoms go away. But with heavier or continued exposure, the damage becomes permanent and irreversible. Chainsaws were notorious for both vibration and hearing damage. It is why A/V mounts were invented. A better running chainsaw and properly sharpened chain help. But I strongly encourage anyone noticing these symptoms to look into good A/V gloves when using any vibrating tool. Hearing protection too.

Philbert
 
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