• Please be aware that we have recently gotten a wave of users that, when researched, are found to be from Nigeria. They are trying to sell products and asking to be paid through Zelle or Venmo leaving users with no recourse if they don't ship the product. If you suspect this activity please contact admin and we will research their information to verify their location.

ArboristSite.com Sponsors
Peak Industries


Chain sharpening.

BJD85

BJD85

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
May 27, 2019
Messages
277
Age
34
Location
Georgia
So through lots of googling and pratice ive gotten decent at holding an angle with a standard oregon hand file. Not good not even close to factory but it cuts. Im sharpening a 325 and a 3/8 with 3/16 and 7/32 file. Im getting pretty tempted to buy an electric sharpener made by buffalo. (Lots of good reviews on it). Do you guys use electric sharpeners? Is it worth the money or should I just keep praticing?

Sent from my LM-G710VM using Tapatalk
 
lil171

lil171

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Oct 2, 2018
Messages
285
Age
41
Location
OAKBANK
As a newbie to this, I too have had good luck hand sharpening, but recently picked up a electric chain grinder similar to the Timber Tuff and like it a lot. My times for hand sharpening vs the grinder are about equal once the chain is off for grinding. However, I have noticed that the grinder takes off a bit more meat than hand filing, but for as much as I cut wood, I am fine with that. I am sure some others with much more knowledge than I will be chiming in to help you better with your question. I know some will not ever use a grinder.
 

U&A

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Jan 17, 2016
Messages
2,294
Age
32
Location
Michigan
Practice doing it by hand.

IMO,

Unless you are doing this for a living and are sharpening a TON of chains daily...... just do it by hand.

Chain “generally” will last longer because you can get away with taking less off. If you want to, run a skip chain. Less sharpening




Sent while firmly grasping my redline lubed RAM
 
BJD85

BJD85

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
May 27, 2019
Messages
277
Age
34
Location
Georgia
Practice doing it by hand.

IMO,

Unless you are doing this for a living and are sharpening a TON of chains daily...... just do it by hand.

Chain “generally” will last longer because you can get away with taking less off. If you want to, run a skip chain. Less sharpening




Sent while firmly grasping my redline lubed RAM
Skip chain does that hace other benifets other than sharpening less? I heard it cutss faster too.

Sent from my LM-G710VM using Tapatalk
 
Mad Professor

Mad Professor

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Jul 2, 2007
Messages
8,779
Location
North East USA
Learn to do it by hand with a file.

I started cutting cordwood for the home and to sell when I was 13; wood was $40 a cord back then. The saw was my my Father's super XL. I learned just using a file without a guide. It did take a while to get good at it.

Things I learned beside the filing: 1) wear gloves to avoid skinning your knuckles, 2) It's easier with the saw clamped in a bench vise, 3) make sure chain is tensioned properly, 4) every few sharpenings take off the bar, clean the grove, dress the rails with a bastard file by draw filing, flip the bar when re-installing., 4) check the rakers every few sharpenings

Later I got a Oregon file holder which helped me keep the file at proper depth when filing, but I got by without one for years. I'd get one for new filers. Also get a depth gauge for the rakers.

Read up on how a chain cuts and how to sharpen before you start learning. Have a sharpie to mark the chain where you start on cutters, inspect the cutters that you have them sharp. Only file a cutter enough to get them sharp, the feel of the file stroke will let you know.

You also will appreciate not turfing the chain or hitting rocks/metal if you sharpen your own, and be able to dress the chain in the woods if you do.
 
Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

Firewood by TJ
Joined
Apr 18, 2016
Messages
2,435
Age
68
Location
Twin Peaks
Harley you need to do some else productive with your red ram. There are pros and cons on how to keep chips flying. When you become proficient at your hand filing you will not have time to take your chains off and on all the time. Thanks
 
BJD85

BJD85

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
May 27, 2019
Messages
277
Age
34
Location
Georgia
I agree I can sharpen my chains as good/better than new with a file.

I started filing in 1973. Back then the best bang for your buck was Carlton chain.
So what do you think the best chain money can buy today is? Durability cutting speed longevity ECT.

Sent from my LM-G710VM using Tapatalk
 
Top