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Firewood...The Most Important Piece of Equipment

Multifaceted

Multifaceted

Firewood Hoarder, Axe Enthusiast
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
1,237
Location
Hillcountry, South-Central PA
Pretty truck. Where's the back seat?

Thanks, it's no Mopar, but it'll do ;)

No back seat, wanted a single cab with full size bed. My only grip about it is that it's an automatic... all of the manual trannies I looked at were in questionable condition, rusted out frames and rockers. At least the wife can drive it now at least...
 
rancher2

rancher2

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malcoln NE
Enjoy the truck. One of the best trucks I ever had was a 2000 F-350 single wheel single cab 4x4 with the 7.3 diesel and a six speed manual. Sold it in 2005 because we wanted a dually and four door. Wish I wouldn't ever sold that 2000. That 2005 was never half the truck. They put three 6.0 motors in that 2005 I sold it in 2011 before the warranty ran out.
 
Multifaceted

Multifaceted

Firewood Hoarder, Axe Enthusiast
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
1,237
Location
Hillcountry, South-Central PA
Enjoy the truck. One of the best trucks I ever had was a 2000 F-350 single wheel single cab 4x4 with the 7.3 diesel and a six speed manual. Sold it in 2005 because we wanted a dually and four door. Wish I wouldn't ever sold that 2000. That 2005 was never half the truck. They put three 6.0 motors in that 2005 I sold it in 2011 before the warranty ran out.

I found a comparable 2001 7.3 with a 6 speed manual that *looked* great, but had some frame rust and was heavily modified as a "Bro-Truck". It was a close second, but I'm glad I went with this one. Love the old square body style that is close to stock. Mine supposedly has a Banks Power aftermarket turbo kit installed, looks newer than the the test of the engine, typical Garret unit but unsure as I'm still new to these engines.
 
ETpilot

ETpilot

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East Texas
My best truck is my current truck. A 1996 Dodge Ram Extended Cab Turbo Diesel. Purchased new September 1995. My first diesel so I had a lot to learn. After the warranty, I started doing my own maintenance. Over the years just normal wear items to repair or replace. My current problem is a leaking heater core. Time consuming repair as you have to roll back the dash to access the HVAC box. Waiting for warmer weather before I tackle that job. I’m now at 364,000 plus miles. But the really amazing thing is: I’m still on the first factory clutch. Still pulls like new and no slipping. Not sure what is going on. Afraid to know. Lol.
 
blades

blades

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it's funny that now everyone is so endeared to the 7.3 , but when it first arrived , my goodness the gnashing of teeth and bad mouthing of same. Course 2/3 of that were the electronics. Still the injector wiring being in the head gaskets still gives me the heby jeebies- that gasket set is pricey and more so to replace them. My square body had the 6.9 everything else on that unit died the red death including the frame but the drive train was still good. Only thing that still worked on the dash was the speedometer even the mileage counter gave up.
 
Multifaceted

Multifaceted

Firewood Hoarder, Axe Enthusiast
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
1,237
Location
Hillcountry, South-Central PA
it's funny that now everyone is so endeared to the 7.3 , but when it first arrived , my goodness the gnashing of teeth and bad mouthing of same. Course 2/3 of that were the electronics. Still the injector wiring being in the head gaskets still gives me the heby jeebies- that gasket set is pricey and more so to replace them. My square body had the 6.9 everything else on that unit died the red death including the frame but the drive train was still good. Only thing that still worked on the dash was the speedometer even the mileage counter gave up.

The fact that it still runs incredibly well (probably due to being properly maintained) is testament. I fresh out of high school when this old girl rolled off of the assembly line, back then I wasn't paying much attention to consumer level diesel engine offerings in full sized pickups or electronic wiring. Just from the time-earned reliability, and the fact that a few of my friends and acquaintances have and still do own them is what lead me into considering purchasing one.
 
Multifaceted

Multifaceted

Firewood Hoarder, Axe Enthusiast
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
1,237
Location
Hillcountry, South-Central PA
My most important piece of equipment is my body, All the tools in the world are useless if your body is not working.

Agreed. This is why it's important to stretch before a long day of cutting, chopping, splitting, and humping heavy logs. Don't know about you, but as I get older, lack of stretching can be the difference of just being tired from hard work or having several days of back and shoulder pain.
 
babybart

babybart

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Agreed. This is why it's important to stretch before a long day of cutting, chopping, splitting, and humping heavy logs. Don't know about you, but as I get older, lack of stretching can be the difference of just being tired from hard work or having several days of back and shoulder pain.

How true. I would watch the Misses do yoga, for obvious reasons, then she talked me into trying it. The stretch is amazing and the level of soreness is decreased after a day at the wood pile, especially on my lower back.
 
SamT1

SamT1

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Nov 18, 2018
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608
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Texas
I keep at least 2 of everything, I have limited time for my wood business so I can’t afford a hiccup.

I have 3 pickups and that’s a pain in the butt having to keep an axe, fuel and oil for saw, service box in each of them. The service box is a 30 cal ammo can in with:
Saw tool, spare rim sproket, clip for rim sproket, air filter, tape measure, 1 new chain, few sharp used chains, bottle of Stihl ultra oil.
Just one of me though, seems to be the weak link. In a couple years my boys will be good help though so I’ll have all bases covered.
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AmateurSawer

AmateurSawer

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Western Va Mountains
A one ton isn't called a one ton because you can put 2000# in it. Take the gross weight of the truck, subtract the curb weight and you have your payload capacity. I've had 4000# of feed (weighed at the elevator) in the bed of my truck and been under 8600# which is my legal gross.

And yes, that picture that I posted shows my truck with a full cord (3 4x8x16" face cords) of wood in it.

Edited to add: most new SRW one tons have a payload around 4000#. Duallys are over 5000#.

"Back when I was young". we had a 1973 Ford F350 with duals and a 12' bed.I hauled 7200 lbs of blend fertilizer several times on it and 5 1100 to 1200 lb cows a lot of times.Was it overloaded?Maybe. Would it do it with being careful? Yes.
 
MechanicMatt

MechanicMatt

Cut Split Stack Burn
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Hudson Valley
My most important piece of equipment is my body, All the tools in the world are useless if your body is not working.

Amen to that Bro! I’ve hauled wood with my quad and trailer, riding mower and trailer and truck. Have more saws then I can run in a week. X27, x25 wedges and 10lb or my hydraulic. Ear muffs and glasses and my helmet with muffs and face shield. Cut with and without chaps. Several pairs of boots and a pair of gloves for every day of the week. BUT... there is only one me! If I get hurt, the whole firewood process stalls. You hit the nail on the head pal, by far the most important part of the whole system is my body! Hurt my knee or back and I gotta tap out
 
motorhead99999

motorhead99999

Jeepin tree man
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Oct 2, 2019
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734
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Sharon springs ny
Shamusturbo:
You like the rubber tire over tracks? I know a guy that has a tracked Cat for work and he too says maintenance is high.
I deliver with a 12' flatbed using pallets and I unload by hand. A guy spoiled me this week unloading the pallets with a rubber tire skid steer. Was nice, but really tore up his gravel driveway doing it. So I was thinking a tracked machine would be better on driveways and yards, but another person said not really. All my pallets are staged on gravel. He thought a tracked machine would tear it up. I guess I need a bigger truck to haul the piggyback forklift. A skid steer however would be more multi-purpose, especially in the winter.
Believe it or not the tracked skid steers are completely helpless on snow that’s been drove over a couple times. We went back to tire skid steer and I just throw a set of cut down loader chains on it in the winter
 
Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Crane

AS Member
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2,627
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Saugatuck, Michigan
I found the same with industrial tires, basically skid steer tires, on the piggyback forklift.
My wants change month to month.
Lately it has been for a used compact wheel loader. Something compact, that will lift 1,500 pounds, and not tear up the ground. Something like the older Kubota R420's or R520's.
I talked to a guy with a 520 this week. Not for sale yet. There are a few around.
The compact tele handlers are pricy little buggers, but have side tilt. Very helpful with forks.
A used 50 hp tractor with power take off is on the list too, as a more multi functional machine, but a bit too big.
 

sb47

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Believe it or not the tracked skid steers are completely helpless on snow that’s been drove over a couple times. We went back to tire skid steer and I just throw a set of cut down loader chains on it in the winter

Sorry I didn't read the whole thread but Just curious but are you using rubber or steel track? And why are tracks less effective, any particular reason tires work better? Since we don't have snow or ice down here, I'm just curious. thanks
 
motorhead99999

motorhead99999

Jeepin tree man
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Messages
734
Location
Sharon springs ny
Sorry I didn't read the whole thread but Just curious but are you using rubber or steel track? And why are tracks less effective, any particular reason tires work better? Since we don't have snow or ice down here, I'm just curious. thanks
Rubber tracks. If they get on any packed snow skid steer will not move. Steel tracks would probably work better or maybe if you put bolts through the rubber tracks to grab the packed stuff they would be ok
 
rancher2

rancher2

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malcoln NE
Believe it or not the tracked skid steers are completely helpless on snow that’s been drove over a couple times. We went back to tire skid steer and I just throw a set of cut down loader chains on it in the winter

I did the same thing out on the farm. Went back to a tired skid loader last time. Lot of things I like about the tracked ones but when mud snow and ice comes it sure nice to threw a set of chains on the wheeled ones and go. One year with the tracked one we had a ice storm and I was stuck in my own drive way had to get the tractor out to pull it to the shed.
 
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