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Hand filing is for beginners?

The Lorax

The Lorax

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Like most stuff files have got cheaper and worse quality as time has passed, I have a cheap grinder and as supplied its not great, however if you have the time and knowledge to dress the wheel to the correct angles, and know how to gently grind the teeth then the grinder does a very good and cost effective job of bringing rocked teeth back to serviceable condition.
To do the same with a file would cost me much more in files than I would care to pay.
But an unskilled user with a poorly set up grinder or the same with a hand file will give similar results, albeit it will take longer to destroy a chain with a hand file.
Many times I have seen people proudly state that they have just sharpened the chain (blade!) and have witnessed a dull chain with bad angles and depth gauges that are all over the place.
Its exactly the same with knives, some people can sharpen and others would be better off with a regularly replaced bread knife.
 
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Bob Hedgecutter

Bob Hedgecutter

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Both I suspect, Stihl chain was always a little harder on files than Oregon but maybe the new Husky C85 is harder?
Possibly is both, but personally I feel the chain quality is somewhat better- or at least harder....... and in quality chains, not non branded or branded with some wonderful name like "Longer"or "Hurricane" go faster type brands, they generally file quite easily!
 
The Lorax

The Lorax

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Possibly is both, but personally I feel the chain quality is somewhat better- or at least harder....... and in quality chains, not non branded or branded with some wonderful name like "Longer"or "Hurricane" go faster type brands, they generally file quite easily!
There has been a lot of chain makers enter the market in the last 10 years, I can't count how many different brands there are now on offer.
That said I am sure that like everything there are good and bad manufacturers and QC plays a part.
Its also a good thing that you can buy a good chain to run in dirty conditions that won't cost an arm and a leg like buying one of the big names in chain.
I haven't run Archer but its everywhere so I may have to buy a loop to see what its like.
edit: I like your series 3, I had a IIA LWB back in NZ, retrofitted with a 202 for airport duty.
 
toadman

toadman

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I always hand file... I find it relaxing at the end of the day while waiting for my food to cook. I don't mind pushing a file across my dull chains throughout the day if they need it, no guide or gauge.
I do use a depth gauge for the rakers, I was doing it by hand for years perfectly happy before CAD struck big time... but I was inconsistent & I found through trial and error, different teeth need different depths due to wear & rocking parts of the chain more than others.
so a 1.5 stroke raker reduction per filing was too much for some teeth and too little for others, causing a rough and erratic cutting attitude. IMG_3839~photo.JPG IMG_3526~photo.JPG But I dream of owning a simington square grinder someday:)
 

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Okie

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I've always hand filed with good results.

Only time I've had problem is grabbing the wrong size file.
I started writing what size file to use on the side of the chainsaws saws. Using the wrong size file is not a good thing, close is no cigar.
First time it happened I sharpened the chain twice with the wrong size file trying to get it too cut good. (it almost cut ok)
 
The Lorax

The Lorax

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You referenced NZ, live in SW Ireland and you are considering Aussie chain......... :ices_rofl:
That 109 was a snail- factory 2 1/4 diesel!
Just bought another one yesterday....... petrol 2 1/4, series 3 also.
Archer may be an Australian brand but the chain is made in China, I watched a Youtube video of the factory in China knocking out links and making it up.
Looked to have decent QC and testing facilities.
 
toadman

toadman

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I always hand file... I find it relaxing at the end of the day while waiting for my food to cook. I don't mind pushing a file across my dull chains throughout the day if they need it, no guide or gauge.
I do use a depth gauge for the rakers, I was doing it by hand for years perfectly happy before CAD struck big time... but I was inconsistent & I found through trial and error, different teeth need different depths due to wear & rocking parts of the chain more than others.
so a 1.5 stroke raker reduction per filing was too much for some teeth and too little for others, causing a rough and erratic cutting attitude. View attachment 838694 View attachment 838693 But I dream of owning a simington square grinder someday:)
That said, I am still learning.
So don't look at my chain too close...(helpful critique is always appreciated)
I am always trying to learn something new, and I usually do.
 
Bob Hedgecutter

Bob Hedgecutter

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Archer may be an Australian brand but the chain is made in China, I watched a Youtube video of the factory in China knocking out links and making it up.
Looked to have decent QC and testing facilities.
Yep, knew it was from there, just like the other two "brands"I referenced. Another is E&S from the same place- probably all share the same components. Have been running a bit of the E&S chain of late in 3/8 0063 and it is not bad at all.
 
nixon

nixon

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I used to hand file only . But , age has awarded me arthritis in both thumbs for some reason . I now do round on a usg / cbn wheel , and square on a simington . I do, however enjoy picking up a file occsaionally just to stay in practice .
 
TheDarkLordChinChin

TheDarkLordChinChin

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Just another thought with grinding you’re more likely to do your other maintenance like cleaning rails, flipping the bar, cleaning the clutch cover out, and greasing the clutch bearing. What chain are you using? How do you like them to cut?


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I use stihl RS chain, I keep it pretty hungry most of the time. 90% of what I cut is spruce, very soft. I flip my bar at the end of the day and whenever else I take it off. Same with dressing the rails.

Personally- I only ever hand file. When I was learning, it was about the only available option, grinders were in shops- in towns, not garages and home workshops back then.
But, I can also trace a fair bit of family history back to Scotland, have deep pockets and short arms, could peel an orange in my pocket (Darklord will know that saying).
Biggest thing to remember is files are not lifelong items- good chain of around 24-30 inch 3/8 full comp- a file lasts about 5 filings. I am not talking a brush between tanks, I am talking 5-10 full strokes per tooth type full filings, then swap it out for a new one.
Files are cheap and nothing cuts as well as a new one.
I have never heard that saying.
 
Bob Hedgecutter

Bob Hedgecutter

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I use stihl RS chain, I keep it pretty hungry most of the time. 90% of what I cut is spruce, very soft. I flip my bar at the end of the day and whenever else I take it off. Same with dressing the rails.



I have never heard that saying.
To have the ability to peel an orange in ones pocket? Must be a Norn Iron thing then? :laugh:
 
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