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Philbert's Chain Salvage Challenge

Philbert

Philbert

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For that chain I believe I would sacrifice a file and hog out the gullet by hand to give your grinder a head start.
Grinder is faster, more consistent, and probably less expensive (wear on wheel vs cost of file) IMO.

But whatever works. Could be a relaxing time with a file, in the shop, with the radio on in the background . . .

Philbert
 
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president

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Out of curiosity, what type of resinoid wheel for hogging? And what do you usually use? (I'm sure you've mentioned it somewhere along the line...)

And check out my new free grinder! Should make life much easier when a good grind is required. I ran the snot out of my HF (or NT?) 511 knock-off until it just wouldn't hold an adjustment any longer. Got some serious mileage out of it, but this AX is on a whole other level by comparison. (You tried to tell me, Philbert.) Got it from a tree service guy whose saws I take care of. He bought it new a couple of years ago. Tried using it a few times instead of his hand jig and Dremel. Hated it. Found it clumsy and slow. Put it back in the box. Stayed there until he gave it to me and I took it out last week..., still like new.


Winner? (Yeah. I SUCK.)
you deserve it !


Lessons?
Fix busy tree guys' saws fast and economically for em -- (while they wait, if you can)!!!

 
PogoInTheWoods

PogoInTheWoods

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These are the same Stihl chains. One new and the other two obviously well used. The guy primarily cuts nasty and dirty slab wood bundles into firewood. Lots of chain heat generated by those conditions resulting in the obvious wear/"stretching" shown in the pics. Saw is a Stihl MS310 running a 20" b/c with a more than adequate oiler. Bar is in good shape and the sprocket was recently replaced. The older chains still appear to be in somewhat serviceable shape with a little cutter length remaining. No excessive wear on the bottoms of the tie straps or the drive links. That pretty much leaves the rivets/presets as the primary wear points to account for the lengthening..., just a hair too much for the range of the chain adjuster now.

So is the wear/stretching to the degree shown in the pics a safety concern, or is it cool (common practice) to just shorten the chain to extend its otherwise useful life? (He has four or five of these older chains.) Figure there's a 'rule-of-thumb' out there somewhere for this. As usual, TIA for any enlightenment.

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heimannm

heimannm

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I would not recommend to run a badly worn/stretched chain on a new sprocket, but certainly keep running the worn ones on worn sprockets to get all of the good out of them.

I always try to match the condition of the chain and drive sprocket, new chains with new sprockets and used chains with used sprockets. If he recently installed a new sprocket, avoid using a badly stretched chain for a while at least to minimize premature damage to the new sprocket.

Mark
 
PogoInTheWoods

PogoInTheWoods

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I suppose the other main consideration for sticking with an old worn sprocket for an older worn chain (within reason, of course) is if an older chain does actually break and bind at the sprocket causing additional damage it wouldn't be that big of a deal compared to buggering up a brand new sprocket.
 
heimannm

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Keep the nose sprocket in mind as well, as the chain "stretches" the drivers don't fit the pitch of the nose sprocket as either, I think that is why you see nose sprockets that are worn to a sharp point. Keep a worn/stretched chain with a worn bar (nose sprocket) and drive sprocket to avoid damage to new components.

Those chains are 72 DL, to "grow" and inch means each rivet has 0.006 to 0.007" of wear so they aren't going to fit new sprockets correctly but it doesn't mean there is any structural damage or loss of strength. The only chain I remember breaking was from a 24" bar on my old Jonsered (came with my 621 but I was using in on a 930) that was worn/filed until the corner of the top plate had reached the rear edge of the cutter. I did not have to remove any drivers but the chain was noticeably longer than a newer one.

For all of the cutting I have done, I only remember the one broken chain.

Mark
 
Philbert

Philbert

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With rim sprockets I suppose that you could swap them in and out with the chains.

Or figure that a rim sprocket costs about $7 and a chain maybe $15 -$25, and decide if extra wear on one is worth getting extra life out of the other.

Might also make a difference if you are a 'one chain on one saw' kind of guy, or someone who swaps out 3-4 loops per day.

Mark's point on the nose sprocket is also something to consider.

Philbert
 
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PogoInTheWoods

PogoInTheWoods

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Roger on the nose sprocket (and the math, Mark). The drive sprocket is a spur in this situation. A rim drive would be a better choice for all the obvious reasons, but a spur is just as easy to change on this particular saw. Guess I'll shorten the chains and see if my breaker/spinner skills are any good. Haven't used the setup since I bought it and today was going to be the day I finally tried it out anyway.

'Preciate the input, fellas. Thanks.
 
heimannm

heimannm

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Use a small dab of grease or oil on the rivet, tighten while spinning, check often so you don't over-do it. Once you like it, note the final position of the clamp and try to keep them all about the same position.

Mark
 
Philbert

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Challenge Chain # 29

cc 29.jpg
This chain came on an electric chainsaw that a friend got at a garage sale: 3/8 low profile, low kickback, low value. I fixed him up with a reconditioned Oregon chain, and he was very happy.

Lots of rust - some links completely covered/encrusted. Lots of wear along the side plates, like, maybe, someone was cutting next to a stone wall. Lots of neglect. Surface rust might not be that hard to remove - did lots of this in earlier threads. Could grind the cutters back, past the heavy abrasion (remove 1/3 to 1/2 of the remaining cutters?). Could break out a few of the really bad cutters and spin it down to a smaller size loop.

Just would be a lot of work for a low value chain. If it was the only one like it, or if I really needed 3/8 low profile chains, it might be different. Headed to the recycling bin, where it can cross the rainbow bridge, and maybe come back as a new chain!

WINNERS? Entropy. Neglect. Carelessness.

LESSONS? Sometimes it is worth it, sometimes less so . . .
 

svk

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@Philbert
I have a few chains that are pretty gummed up from cutting very wet red oak. Do you know of anything that will dissolve baked on oak sap?
 
Philbert

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I start with SuperClean (or similar water-based cleaners with sodium hydroxide). Toothbrush or TIG welding scratch brush (stainless steel).

Philbert
 
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schmauster

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Love this thread, been following it for a long time.

Ordering my Oxalic Acid as a stocking stuffer :)


I still suck at sharpening but this thread has been a great baseline of what things should look like. Im sure youre helping a lot of people that dont chime in
 
ken morgan

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good read Phil, jumped on this a couple of days ago after all the comments on the guy that was trying to recondition an old craftsman that had been dunked and left dunked in water. It seems to me that you have covered all of the bases I would have tried for rust removal, (and a few I would not have thought of) fun is where you find it thats for sure, and some of the chains in this thread were well how can I say it just wow... cheers and I will keep following to see if you have any other tricks hidden up your sleeve.
 
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