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PPE, chainsaw trousers and gloves

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by LondonNeil, Jun 5, 2019.

  1. LondonNeil

    LondonNeil Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I'll start by 'phoning a friend' to the thead... @Philbert is wise and knowledgeable here I think

    So after upgrading the saw last year, from an ickle ms180 to a big boys 365 x-torq, i probably ought to upgrade the PPE. Should have already really but....

    since I only buck up logs already on the ground I can stay much safer than many by not being stupid/absent minded but I'm generally safely conscious and wear PPE at all times when cutting oregon yukon boots (the big welly type,class 3), current trousers are class 1 type A, foresters helmet with visor and ear defenders and some gloves which without going to check i can't recall if they are only class 0 (16m/s) or class 1 (20m/s)

    365 - husky site says -
    Chain speed at 133% of maximum engine power speed
    30.2 m/s

    I work that out tobe 22.7m/s at 100% So do the current trousers not really cut it? Should i be looking to upgrade the trousers to class 2 (24 m/s) or ? I know no PPE offers 100% protection, but is class 2 appropriate?

    I'm thinking these https://www.frjonesandson.co.uk/pro...onal-chainsaw-trousers-type-a-class-2-medium/ they seem to be the cheapest class 2 trousers around and a trusted brand

    So guys. Am i being over cautious, about right and on to a fair plan with those husky kecks, or playing dangerous and should wear much more? Ta
     
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  2. Philbert

    Philbert Chainsaw Enthusiast

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    There are different levels of protection, based on the power of the saw. We really don't use those classifications much in the US. Manufacturers sell their products as '3-layer' or '6-layer' chaps, with the presumption that 6 is more protective. But it is hard to compare between different brands / products. There might be something in our ANSI standards, but it can be hard to find.

    Your EN standards make this easier. I found a good explanation on this website:
    https://sip-protection.com/en/technical/standards

    More protective gear is almost always heavier and hotter to wear (especially trousers, versus chaps*). So if it becomes too uncomfortable, then stuff that you will actually wear may be 'more' protective. And, as you note, work practices are also important.

    * I am not seeing protective chaps - are they sold in Europe?

    Philbert
     
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  3. H-Ranch

    H-Ranch ArboristSite Guru

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    I don't want to tell you what to do, but if it were *me*, I would use what I had until it was ready for replacement and then upgrade if needed. If I fell into a deal in the meantime I may consider earlier. Now if it was a regulated industry where items were specified that would be different, but we are talking about backyard wood cutting.

    I'm guessing you're already using more PPE than most. Most don't have any level of rated protection on their gloves I would dare say. And many use nothing, including eat protection even. It's nearly always possible to use more protection so it's up to you too decide how much is enough (full wrap chaps, safety glasses/ shield, safety chain, training/ certification, first aid kit, cell phone, cutting partner, lifting restrictions, stretching, clean work area, and so on...)

    The same goes for level of protection. 133% of maximum chain speed is pretty serious stuff. Lots of injuries that occur could be prevented with much less than the maximum level of protection.

    And attitude - consciously setting a firm stance, not reaching, stopping before fatigue, not going beyond your skill level, and of course wearing your gear probably does more to keep you safe than anything.

    If you decide to get the new pants you can always say that the car needed new tyres if you have to hide the cost of your hobby! :innocent:
     
  4. LondonNeil

    LondonNeil Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Yes chaps are available Philbert, I've no idea why but they do seem less common

    Thanks h-ranch, that reinforces my thinking.
     
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  5. LondonNeil

    LondonNeil Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Thought I'd just give a brief explanation of the protection levels for those of you not so knowledgeable as Philbert. The protection class we use is 0, 1,2 or 3 and shows the chain speed it should protect against...ie the sprocket should clog and stop the saw before the chain is completely through. 0 = 16m/s, then 20, 24 and finally 28 m/s.
    Then for trousers there is the type A or C, which indicates where the wadding is. A are designed for ground work, protection is on the front of the legs and left side. Type C are aimed at climbers who I guess are more often in odd positions or not so firmly stood and the extra coverage is mainly the calves, possibly elsewhere on the back of the legs too.

    Gloves, I don't think I've ever seen more then class 0 or 1. The wadding is to the back of the left hand.

    Boots have a steel toe in each and wadding over the shin and top of foot.

    All this is based on data about where the most common injuries are (which I think originates with us forestry studies).


    I wear a helmet on the ground even just bucking for 3 reasons....I prefer a screen/visor for eye protection as specs sweat/mist up terribly....I am a very sweaty oick when exercising! The helmet ear muffs are comfy and.... Whether right or just dreaming I feel the hard peek would give some protection in the event of a kick back.... Only if the chain brake has worked but at least the bar smacking the peek helps prevent a bar full of cutters smacking my face.
     
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  6. Cowboy254

    Cowboy254 ESD sufferer

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    C'mon man, who would use that lame excuse!? :buttkick:

    :laugh:

    (Full disclosure for non-scroungers: I have done that at least twice)
     
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  7. walter e

    walter e New Member

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  8. walter e

    walter e New Member

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    When you decide to go for the pants, explain to the financial officer how much cheaper pants are than an ER visit.
     
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