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Seeking advice on woodsplitter for home using 16 cord annually

W4FY

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Good afternoon,
I am in North Carolina and have a central boiler OWB which heats my house and three-car garage. By the time this winter is over, I will have burned approximately four tri-axle dump truck loads of logs which I estimate to be around 15 cord.
This spring I would like to upgrade to a wood splitter with a log lift that is not so hard on my back; plus I would like to work up two years worth of wood so that I am getting at least some wood to season.

I would like to get the best bang for the buck, and I am willing to spend around $12k if the machine is right.

Any advice or suggestions?
 
Ryan'smilling

Ryan'smilling

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I'd be looking pretty hard at the Eastonmade splitters. I'd also throw, Wolfe Ridge, iron and oak, timberwolf, powersplit, in the mix as well. Not sure if AE metalworks is making splitters currently, but his stuff was top notch.
 
nathan4104

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i have a question, sorry it's a bit off topic for you but...
that seems like a lot of wood!! Do you guys get a lot of below 30° weather? or below 0?
how well are houses insulated?
Up here, my friend has a big OWB, heats 2 houses, (both around 1200-1400sq for) hot water, and a small 1 car garage. it gets to -40, -15f is a normal daytime high temp for weeks on end. He burns about 20 cord of spruce. cuts it in 32" long pieces and does not split it. some take some muscle to load but most of it is dead standing dry.

as for a splitter, would a kinetic one be any good? people seem to like their supersplit style
I have a double acting 'Splitfire' which is built tough and is very fast.
 
sirbuildalot

sirbuildalot

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Does seem like a lot of wood for that far south.

What species of wood are you splitting, and how big and ugly is it?

If its relatively straight, stuff and not monster sized (as in 2'+), I'd get a Supersplit. You can get one for around 3 grand, and it'll easily do a full cord an hour. So you could potentially with a couple of helpers do all your wood in one weekend. Nothing against hydraulic splitters, but to get the same production that you get from a Supersplit, you need to spend a lot more money. Not to mention they typically have bigger engines, and need hydraulic fluid which means more fuel/more money. They are also heavier and harder to move around, where a Supersplit can easily be moved around by hand and take up alot less space in a building to be stored.

If you wood is a really tough to split species and/or is huge, then a hydraulic splitter with a log lift is the better solution.
 

W4FY

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I live at 5000’ elevation and it’s not uncommon to see temps down to -20 and 100 inches of snow for the year.

I am heating around 4000 sq ft.

i have a question, sorry it's a bit off topic for you but...
that seems like a lot of wood!! Do you guys get a lot of below 30° weather? or below 0?
how well are houses insulated?
Up here, my friend has a big OWB, heats 2 houses, (both around 1200-1400sq for) hot water, and a small 1 car garage. it gets to -40, -15f is a normal daytime high temp for weeks on end. He burns about 20 cord of spruce. cuts it in 32" long pieces and does not split it. some take some muscle to load but most of it is dead standing dry.

as for a splitter, would a kinetic one be any good? people seem to like their supersplit style
I have a double acting 'Splitfire' which is built tough and is very fast.
 
EchoRomeoCharlie

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kinetic style splitter if you're not splitting really gnarly stuff. You can really fly through some wood with those things, but if you get into nasty wood, they're real irritating in my experience.

Otherwise, for 16c per year....you're going to want to spend some money. Professional/Commercial level machines(mentioned already by another member) will be faster and longer lasting getting you more cords per dollar with less down time over the lifetime of the unit.
 
Ryan'smilling

Ryan'smilling

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To me a super split seems ideal for wood that starts in the 12-20" diameter range that you want to turn into stove wood, either for selling or burning in a woodstove. The OP has a boiler though, so bigger chunks are fine. I think this is a situation where a big hydro with a 4 way and a lift makes perfect sense. No, they aren't cheap, but you should have little trouble pushing a cord an hour through one and at 16 cords a year you will never wear one out.
 

W4FY

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Does seem like a lot of wood for that far south.

What species of wood are you splitting, and how big and ugly is it?

If its relatively straight, stuff and not monster sized (as in 2'+), I'd get a Supersplit. You can get one for around 3 grand, and it'll easily do a full cord an hour. So you could potentially with a couple of helpers do all your wood in one weekend. Nothing against hydraulic splitters, but to get the same production that you get from a Supersplit, you need to spend a lot more money. Not to mention they typically have bigger engines, and need hydraulic fluid which means more fuel/more money. They are also heavier and harder to move around, where a Supersplit can easily be moved around by hand and take up alot less space in a building to be stored.

If you wood is a really tough to split species and/or is huge, then a hydraulic splitter with a log lift is the better solution.
Oak, Hickory, Locust, and Ash.
Only one decently straight is Ash, plus I buy the logs that loggers don’t necessarily want so they often aren’t ideal.
 
Natster

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Lots of research.
Watch Craigslist.
Watch classifieds.
When the right one comes along, jump on it, like a goose on a junebug.
I like the supersplit. For the money, and performance, hard to beat. For big gnarly, hydraulic, with a lift. But, fast has its merits.
N
 
jrider

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I would look at the Eastonmade and Timberwolf units. I have a Timberwolf TW6 which comes standard with a log lift and 4 way/6way wedge. You would be able to fly through the wood with it when splitting for an OWB.
Everyone talking about a Supersplit but it doesn't have a log lift.
 
sirbuildalot

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I would look at the Eastonmade and Timberwolf units. I have a Timberwolf TW6 which comes standard with a log lift and 4 way/6way wedge. You would be able to fly through the wood with it when splitting for an OWB.
Everyone talking about a Supersplit but it doesn't have a log lift.
The TW6 with log lift and 6 way is also at least 3 times the price of a Supersplit. Comparing apples to oranges. The Split second manual log lift does fit the Supersplit. Obviously it won lift 500 lb rounds though.

To the OP, if you are splitting gnarly stuff from tree guys that wont go through a processor, then I hoper your getting a discounted price per load. You're best option is a big hydraulic unit, or get used to noodling to manageable sizes. You're probably looking at a 8k-10k investment though. As previously mentioned by others, Id look at Timberwolf, Eastonmade, and Wolfe Ridge.
 
husqvarna257

husqvarna257

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I run a OWB and I do buy loads of logs that processors spit out. For the logger it's not worth the time to deal with it so I get loads that work out to be $70 or less a cord. That said I have a large home built hydraulic splitter. Some of the nasty stuff I get shears rather than splits, I don't have to noodle. I would stay away from the super split if you are getting nasty wood, nice log length the super split would be great. As others have said keep your eye out for splitters on craigslist. And split aged wood will cut your wood burning allot
 

W4FY

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The TW6 with log lift and 6 way is also at least 3 times the price of a Supersplit. Comparing apples to oranges. The Split second manual log lift does fit the Supersplit. Obviously it won lift 500 lb rounds though.

To the OP, if you are splitting gnarly stuff from tree guys that wont go through a processor, then I hoper your getting a discounted price per load. You're best option is a big hydraulic unit, or get used to noodling to manageable sizes. You're probably looking at a 8k-10k investment though. As previously mentioned by others, Id look at Timberwolf, Eastonmade, and Wolfe Ridge.
I’m looking hard at Wolfe Ridge 28HO with 30” stroke, auto valve, electric start, and 6 way wedge. I get my wood at around $75.00/cord.
 
Ryan'smilling

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I’m looking hard at Wolfe Ridge 28HO with 30” stroke, auto valve, electric start, and 6 way wedge. I get my wood at around $75.00/cord.
I have a Wolfe Ridge 3 point splitter on my tractor. Only thing I don't care for on his design is that the wedge can't go to zero. I want to be able to drop it all the way down and use it without the 4-way. Personally I think a 6 way isn't as useful as a 4 unless you're in "processor wood". I'd have a strong preference for a 4-way that can drop all the way. I haven't seen any of his newer stuff, so he may be building them this way by now.
 
jrider

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The TW6 with log lift and 6 way is also at least 3 times the price of a Supersplit. Comparing apples to oranges. The Split second manual log lift does fit the Supersplit. Obviously it won lift 500 lb rounds though.

To the OP, if you are splitting gnarly stuff from tree guys that wont go through a processor, then I hoper your getting a discounted price per load. You're best option is a big hydraulic unit, or get used to noodling to manageable sizes. You're probably looking at a 8k-10k investment though. As previously mentioned by others, Id look at Timberwolf, Eastonmade, and Wolfe Ridge.
Not saying it isn’t significantly more money but he did say he’s willing to pay 12k
 
jrider

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I have a Wolfe Ridge 3 point splitter on my tractor. Only thing I don't care for on his design is that the wedge can't go to zero. I want to be able to drop it all the way down and use it without the 4-way. Personally I think a 6 way isn't as useful as a 4 unless you're in "processor wood". I'd have a strong preference for a 4-way that can drop all the way. I haven't seen any of his newer stuff, so he may be building them this way by now.
Splitting for boiler wood is much different than making traditionally smaller splits. You can run a 24” log through in one pass and be on to the next piece
 
Ryan'smilling

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Splitting for boiler wood is much different than making traditionally smaller splits. You can run a 24” log through in one pass and be on to the next piece
I mostly want the drop the wedge for the first pass through a croth. I mostly run my splitter on a slightly underpowered tractor, so my valve is set a little under 2000psi. It's a 5" cylinder. I occasionally stick a piece and can't split it. Have to pull it backwards.

I just think for one piece out of a hundred it'd be nice to be able to drop the wedge all the way to keep the splits a little nicer and reduce the stress on the splitter.
 
jrider

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I mostly want the drop the wedge for the first pass through a croth. I mostly run my splitter on a slightly underpowered tractor, so my valve is set a little under 2000psi. It's a 5" cylinder. I occasionally stick a piece and can't split it. Have to pull it backwards.

I just think for one piece out of a hundred it'd be nice to be able to drop the wedge all the way to keep the splits a little nicer and reduce the stress on the splitter.
I was commenting on the use of a 6 way wedge vs a 4 way
 
Hinerman

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I cut & split around the same amount of wood, mostly Oak. Did it by hand for 25 years. Bought a Super Split 10 years ago & Love It! I will never own a different splitter.
For $12K he could get a super split and a very nice and adequate hydraulic splitter with a log lift for the big stuff, probably with money left over. I have both and it is very convenient. 16 cord per year is not very much, not enough to justify a $12K hydro splitter IMO
 
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