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Tips for how to dig your dogs in and make humboldts like you PNW guys.

madhatte

madhatte

It's The Water
Staff member
Joined
Apr 19, 2009
Messages
7,089
Location
Puget Sound
I dont know why but using the back of the bar just feels simpler sometimes..
Backbarring means fighting reaction forces that you don't really need to fight, plus it changes the leverage you can apply with the dawgs. It is definitely more useful bucking than falling. However, I do like to use the back of the bar to clean out face cuts, because I can sight down the bar like a rifle and the chain pushes the chips away from my face.
 
HumBurner

HumBurner

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Dec 23, 2018
Messages
113
Age
33
Location
SoHum
Tips? Maybe not do it that way
Set angle cut from the front and then stick the dog to the corner.
I much prefer this method than sweeping from one side of the face to the other, especially in smaller trees where you have way less room for error/correction than in a larger tree. Make flat cut, position saw to center and line up visually, progress cut a second or two, double check visually, proceed cut. Once you get used to this method, you can often forget the second visual check, especially if you watch the cut the whole time.

On medium-to-larger trees 16"+, there are a lot of factors, including presence of rot/cat-face, terrain (rocky, loose/duffy, steep, saturated soil, etc...) that may make sweeping the face easier or more difficult than cutting from the center (one point) to the target (two points), though I find myself sweeping more on larger trees. It really all comes down to what is comfortable for the sawyer in the moment.

That being said, it's rare that I use a conventional face. Sometimes on uphill trees, especially if steep, when wanting to keep the butt on the stump so it doesn't roll upon hitting the ground or when swinging smaller trees I will employ a conventional cut. Otherwise, Humboldt.
 
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