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What’s your story about chainsa I regret

Huskybill

Huskybill

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What’s your story on how our beginning started with chainsaws?

My story started when we installed a wood-stove. I purchased two new craftsman chainsaws. My scrounging for fire wood started. They were cutting a new highway, plenty of firewood stacked up as big as ranch houses. I got 20 cords off the new highway when my saws died. I ran them harder than any home owner. I was ready to buy two new Stihl saws when a co worker said they had a Husqvarna dirtbike they ran all summer and never died. Me a home owner at this point purchased a new Husqvarna professional 2100cd and a new Husqvarna professional 240sg. When the firewood business started, I really had too much wood, way more than I needed to heat the garage, the house and shed. Funny soon after I purchased the huskys I got laid off in the recession of ‘83 after working 3 months, laid off again in ‘84 after working for three months, again in ‘85 after working three months. I was going from sinking ship to sinking ship the companies were closing left and right. I put in a job application and go back a week later to find the company closed. I went for over a year with no job but self employed cutting and selling firewood. It really started me off selling firewood with the huskys and my pickup truck with having a wood supply. I was in the best health of my life. I was an Animal.I regret not staying in the woods I was happy. In ‘86 the engineering job lasted for 20 years. I hated working inside. :numberone::happybanana::laughing::chainsaw:

What’s your story..?
 

svk

A little bit of everything
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And by the title I came in here planning to read about you selling a saw and regretting it.

We have a wood burning sauna and fireplace. Growing up we had a nightly fire in the fireplace each weekend evening from fall to spring. All told we probably burned a cord a year. I wanted to help my dad so he bought me a Husqvarna 41 in 1991 because he wanted me to learn on a saw with a brake. I ran his original fleet for about 20 years before I found this place.
 
Stem450Husky

Stem450Husky

Wombat Rancher
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Sep 19, 2012
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my parents have always burned wood long before I was around, as a young kid I helped my dad split & stack what I could pick up. As I got older I started bucking logs with his Husqy 51. I bought my Husqy 450 in '09, greatly reduced the amount of cutting time spent. In '11 or '12 I picked up my Stihl 650. His Husqy 51 eventually crapped out & didn't want to bother me with fixing it so in '13 he bought a 450 also. In Dec of '14 (age 64) he had a stroke & although he recovered greatly from that his left side is still weak so since then I've been doing the grunt work, he operates the splitter hydraulics while I feed it & helps me stack the best he can but can only pickup small stuff. I owe it to him anyway & definitely don't mind the work.
 
rarefish383

rarefish383

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I grew up 4th generation in the tree business, so I didn't have the learning curve to conquer that most beginners do. I remember one new guy came on here and claimed he had a brand new chain, never used, just put on, and wouldn't cut. First thought I had was he put it one backwards. Honest mistake, I've done it before, I just catch it while tightening the chain. Some one told him to post a pic. I just happened to be the first one to see the pic and replied, "Hope I don't hurt your feelings, but you are full of crap! That chain is not new, and has been used, it looks like some one tried to cut my concrete side walk in half with it." He replied that he had used it for a couple cuts, and he had been on his concrete driveway. I remember following him for a while, he may still be here. Anyway, I never had to go through that kind of stuff. I'm a bit collector specific to Homelites, because that's what we used back in the day. But, if I add up all of my non Homelites I have more of them than the Homies. Only regrets about any saws I've had are the ones I've sold. I threw a major temper tantrum once and sold all of my Dad's saws but his 2 Super 1050's and his Disston DA211. I've replaced all the ones I can remember having. That being said, if some one comes over and says they really like a saw on a shelf, as long as it's not one of my big ones, and I have an extra, I send it home with them. No regrets, there are always more of them. Gonna go see if I can get the new Echo 280E running right now. Hope I'm back in 10 minutes with an update?
 
rarefish383

rarefish383

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Well, that was quick. One prime in the carb, second pull, it started. 3 primes and it started drawing from the tank, running and sounds great. Air cleaner looks like a pair of my BIL's socks. May have to try and find a new one. Will try cleaning first.
 
Snowchaser

Snowchaser

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Grew up splitting and stacking, then limbing/ bucking when i could work a saw. My parents always heated home and shop with wood. My Grandma did too and her home was turn of the century and not insulated well. My dad was one of eleven kids and the family reunions were firewood getting adventures. She probably burned 6+ cords a winter. My dad and one brother were the local ones that were the primary ones though. Found a lot of BIG doug firs then. One tree fills 3 or 4 pick up trucks with racks up above the cab. Good times.
 
carwashguy

carwashguy

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We burned wood everywhere. At the dairy barn. My grannies and our house. Probably 20 cords or so a winter. Ran 026s and 038s. Mostly split with a maul. My papaw bought a splitter that went on the back of a tractor. Looked like a corkscrew. The most dangerous thing I ever seen. Would do it’s best to break your arm.


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full chizel

full chizel

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
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And by the title I came in here planning to read about you selling a saw and regretting it.

We have a wood burning sauna and fireplace. Growing up we had a nightly fire in the fireplace each weekend evening from fall to spring. All told we probably burned a cord a year. I wanted to help my dad so he bought me a Husqvarna 41 in 1991 because he wanted me to learn on a saw with a brake. I ran his original fleet for about 20 years before I found this place.
I don’t even know what the title is trying to say
 
Huskybill

Huskybill

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When my two sons showed interest in cutting firewood I gave them a husky 570 each.
I gave one a jred 910e, the other a husky 460. I set them up right.
 
OM617YOTA

OM617YOTA

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Jan 20, 2020
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Oregon
Parents heated their home with wood, but were mostly clueless. Had a family friend who was somewhat less clueless who showed me what he knew. We burned up several Craftsman/Poulan 42cc saws because his tuning method was "lean it out as far as you dare" and when it burned up "well that's just how long a saw lasts" and "if you get two seasons out of a saw that was a damned good saw!"

I bought a non running but mostly complete Mac 795 with what seemed like a 12 foot bar(probably actually 30" or thereabouts) at a yard sale for $3. Got it running, enjoyed making some big chips, but it was just way, way too big and overkill for what I was doing - at the time living in an apartment and helping my parents with firewood. Just nothing I needed it for, so I posted it for sale or trade for a solid firewood saw. Someone traded me a an 034AV Super w/a an 18" bar straight across for it. Suited my needs perfectly.

I learned how to tune it properly and not burn it up. Between helping my parents, a few friends, and my own firewood needs, it's done probably 40 cords of wood.

Only regret is the Husky 236 I traded some junk I had laying around the shop for with zero research. I should have done research, I'd have taken cash in stead of the saw.
 
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