ArboristSite.com Sponsors
www.harvesterbars.com


Where are the tonnage specs coming from ?

NSMaple1

NSMaple1

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
May 15, 2013
Messages
2,111
Location
Nova Scotia
It’s pi time (x) the bore, times (x) the hydraulic pressure.

The surplus center has the hydraulic pumps and cylinders you match the pump to your engines hp.

My last homebuilt splitter was a 5” bore x pi 3.1416= 15.07 x 3,000 psi= 47.124 tons. What she didn’t split she cut through it.

I built a 32ton splitter with a 3,000psi with a 3.5” bore cylinder for 25 years homemade. My only problems was the free I beam was too thin but a sledge hammer would fix it when it bent but not often.

I have extra I beams here is anyone in ct or nearby is interested affordable.

Um ya, your math's a bit off there.
 
Dcsco

Dcsco

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Jun 29, 2020
Messages
30
Location
NC
This is how i did pressure calculations for boiler examination.

Easy way to remember is that a circle is 79% (.7854) of a square. 5” square =25sq.in.

79% of 25 = 19.75 sq in area times force.

19.75 x 3000psi = 59,250 pounds force.

Convert to tons 59,250/2000= 29.625 (tons)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
tla100

tla100

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
May 11, 2014
Messages
1,799
Location
bfe
When I bought my house with old woodstove(since upgraded), I started cutting my own firewood and bought a small, electric 4 ton splitter. It is an awesome machine and has split over 50 cords of wood.
surprising what it could do. I use it to do small amounts or kindling or indoor splitting now.
I've since bought a Forest King farm model hydro splitter rated at 30 tons.
I know it can't be pushing 30 tons of force at the blade so its definitely false advertising.
It does good though and was on sale so I'm happy with it.
View attachment 863294 View attachment 863295

Man I have had the same electric one..it was horrible. Wedge design too blunt. Granted didn't have much in it and made a few bucks off it.

Did just pick up a 30 ton Brute that is about identical to yours too. It is a lot faster and a lot more power than my homebuilt one. Smaller pump and cylinder are culprit i think. Nice splitter tho!!!
 
muddstopper

muddstopper

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Nov 20, 2011
Messages
5,231
Location
mountains of nc
SO Many times I get asked if I put a bigger engine on my existing splitter will it cycle faster? No. More speed requires a larger flow, which then takes more horsepower to turn that larger pump at the same maximum pressure.
Thats actually a yes and no answer. I have never tested this, but observation has led me to believe that most box store splitters are supplied with just enough engine to run at full load without stalling. In this situation the motor will slow rpms as the pump pressure increases. This is the point where a little more hp will decrease cycle times due to the ability to maintain rpms and pump flow. Now how much this small amount of rpm and flow will decrease cycle times isnt as important as is that little extra "speed" worth the cost. While the cost of a 1 or 2 hp bigger engine is a small, one time, cost, the every day cost would have to include the extra fuel needed every day the machine is operated. Or in my case is the faster cycle time worth more to me than being aggravated waiting on the cylinder to return. My splitter is way over powered with a 25 hp kholer and 28gmp 2 stage pump and I wouldnt want to swap the motor out for a smaller one even tho the math says I can.
 
milkie62

milkie62

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Oct 10, 2007
Messages
585
Location
upstate NY
I have a TSC Countryline 25T I picked up on sale for $900. It has split everything I've put in it, 23" ash rounds included.
I would be more impressed if you said a 23" elm or oak crotch. It does not matter what dia the wood is if it is straight. I have done 43 " pine rounds. Does that indicate that I have a super splitter----no.
 
Top