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Brush cutter blades

sir1

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Can someone shed some light on the differences between regular steel blades for brush cutters?
I have all the way from 3 tooth, to 4 etc tooth, to chisel tooth (like a saw blade), scratcher tooth (lots of bigger and smaller). Does the design vary depending on conditions like dry vs wet?

The only blade I have never tried is usually called the beaver blade. Basically a chainsaw chain around a disk. These seem the best choice.
How does the chain come on/off these? Is there a chain tensioner or does it slip sometimes?
Does blades size depend on brush cutter ccs?
Thanks
 
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alderman

alderman

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When I had a lot of saplings and small trees to take down I did most of my cutting with an 80 tooth steel blade. Once I got rid of all of the woody material I do most of it with a .105 string head.


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kirko

kirko

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Hey Sir1
Plenty of different blades out there for plenty of different tasks,,Im always brushcutting and clearing and I have narrowed it down to a few thus far.
Airecut or brush knife for thick grasses when nylon just don't cut it,, carbide tipped circular saw blade for saplings,, Shredder blade for dense woody weeds.
I generally use high powered clearing saws with no guard and a long pair of pants work just fine for me. oh don't forget your face mask and sunnies and you will be fine.
Cheers Kirko
 
Franny K

Franny K

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The four blade ones are generally for grass.
The chainsaw tooth ones (I am not going to say all of them) the cutters are riveted to the disc instead of being one side of a tie strap assembly on a chain.
With the three prong blades I wear gloves of course they are for bike handle devices, the danger is on the second time cutting it lower a chunk can hit the hand. Can not recall getting sore ankles but sure have had hand hits.
Probably the best one for say 3/4 inch and above is a disc with about 24 teeth that are set to the sides and sharpened with a round chainsaw file. I use the big ones 12 inch for the 3 prong the other ones are a little smaller. There is a whole smaller size of them that is more commonly stocked at retail places. Cutter size in cc, shaft size in mm, bearing size in the angle drive, etc. Did I mention bike handle and harness type and then if you get into real thick stuff an anvil of sorts that is an accessory listed in the manual.

Fran
 
7sleeper

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The only blade type not mentioned sofar is the mulcher blade. They exist with two or more blades with the end bent down which point to the ground. They require a straight schaft, minimum 40cc engine and are absolutely devastating! If you use one I HIGHLY recomend a forest helmet with full face shield and tough pants or some even use a welding apron. Look like this



the effect is like this.


7
 
timbercare366

timbercare366

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I like the mulching blade in particular, I've used many different types of blades but this one is more productive. Where I live its called a kudzu blade we actually have a kudzu crew in my town that contract and they use that blade on their equipment. For contract clearing jobs I've had in the past I used that blade for the heavy grasses, saplings and general and I would go back over with my weedeater with 105
 

svk

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If you are cutting woody brush or small trees the Beaver blade is the best out there when kept sharp. I have a standard blade on mine (similar to a multi use table saw blade) as I don't use it enough to justify the higher cost of the beaver blade.
 
7sleeper

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I will admit that I have no experience with a beaver blade but I cannot see how it will be better than a standard circular saw blade type. Of course the circular saw blade type should be sharpened correctly and the correct technique should be used. But faster and more productive!?!? I highly doubt it.

7
 

svk

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I will admit that I have no experience with a beaver blade but I cannot see how it will be better than a standard circular saw blade type. Of course the circular saw blade type should be sharpened correctly and the correct technique should be used. But faster and more productive!?!? I highly doubt it.

7
I've cut side by side and trust me when I say there is a big difference.
 
7sleeper

7sleeper

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I've cut side by side and trust me when I say there is a big difference.
I believe you absolutely! But when I see all videos on youtube allmost everyone is pinching the the circular saw blade, thus GREATLY reducing cutting speed! You can clearly hear it! And the chainsaw blade seems to be more forgiving in that aspect. So I am still a bit uncertain. Maybe one of these days I will have to buy one to try out.

This is kind of like the cutting/work speed I am used to with a circular saw blade. You hear about no pinching at all of the saw blade!


7
 

sir1

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The shredder blades seems pretty productive.

For thicker trees 2-3" a saw blade with many sharp teeth will be best right? Thats what we use and it seems to work good. They dull but can be sharpened. We carry spares. Just want to make sure I am not missing a blade style of the bigger stuff.

Also, I've seen beaver blades where the cutter are attached. But this seems not very practical. I think those are called tornado blades by a diff company.
 

sir1

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For the beaver blade guys...how does the chain stay on? Is there a tensioner or screws?

What size and guage is the chain?
The one way I see the beaver blade being very effective is to buy a couple of blades and a length of chain and make your own chains. Swap in the field to keep them very sharp.
Strange I cant fine on google or the DR website any chain info or install/remove info
 
Sagetown

Sagetown

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Dec 24, 2010
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SE Oklahoma
Right view bush saw.jpg
Can someone shed some light on the differences between regular steel blades for brush cutters?
I have all the way from 3 tooth, to 4 etc tooth, to chisel tooth (like a saw blade), scratcher tooth (lots of bigger and smaller). Does the design vary depending on conditions like dry vs wet?

The only blade I have never tried is usually called the beaver blade. Basically a chainsaw chain around a disk. These seem the best choice.
How does the chain come on/off these? Is there a chain tensioner or does it slip sometimes?
Does blades size depend on brush cutter ccs?
Thanks
This is the best I've found. Goes through sprouts, and saplings like a hot knife in butter. Just have to learn the right angle when it's time to re-sharpen. Also, don't stay in the cut of a large (4") sapling, the blade gets very hot. So, just ease into it in pulses. Smaller saplings fall quickly at passing.
RaZorMax 7 inch.jpg
This type is fair. Best used for tuff weeds.
stihl brush blade.jpg
 
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sir1

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View attachment 498929 This is the best I've found. Goes through sprouts, and saplings like a hot knife in butter. Just have to learn the right angle when it's time to re-sharpen. Also, don't stay in the cut of a large (4") sapling, the blade gets very hot. So, just ease into it in pulses. Smaller saplings fall quickly at passing.
View attachment 498926
This type is fair. Best used for tuff weeds.
View attachment 498927

Are the cutters replaceable? Seems wasteful if not replaceable. Ive several variants of similar blades.
 
Sagetown

Sagetown

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Are the cutters replaceable? Seems wasteful if not replaceable. Ive several variants of similar blades.
THe teeth are riveted in just like on a saw chain, so I don't see why a saw shop couldn't replace broken teeth.
On the other hand, that STIHL blade needs close attention between uses, because fissures will appear near the edges and works their way down to the center of the blade. Best to stop using it at that point and time.
 
Sagetown

Sagetown

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chaps.jpg
I use chaps, because invariably when doing this, I also have the saws nearby to go after bigger things, also because the stuff really flies off the brush cutter.
I don't always use chaps for brush cutting. But when I do, I use light weight Coon Hunting Chaps with zip up legs ,$19.95 last pair i bought. Just use them to keep the briars from sticking my legs, and keeps the grass and weeds off my pants too.
With the blade I've only had particles and stuff fly off of it, and somehow it throws right at my face. Now a String Trimmer will throw rocks at your legs and that smarts.
These Chaps come from Nite Lite. They are great for brush and yard work. Slip on over your boots, and buckle on to your belt loops.
 
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