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Drying oak boards does this make sense?

Polish hammer

Polish hammer

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I was scrolling through Craigslist and seen this ad to me this goes against everything I know of drying boards from wet to in front of a fan in 70* wouldn’t these warp and crack like crazy and not get that low of moisture ? Hope this isn’t anyone on here’s ad E10C456D-85DF-4238-BD59-AA43C9A23ADB.png
 
John Stryker

John Stryker

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Sticker piled and ends painted, I think it might work pretty good. If you had it piled indoors, a fan would help with air movement, which you wouldn't need if it were piled outdoors with natural air movement. If it is winter logged lumber, it's already low in sap content anyway.
Anyways, I'm just guessing, because I only have experience in air drying lumber outdoors.
 
nwmo_aggie

nwmo_aggie

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My experience.

oak logs, mostly white oak, but some red also. 8-12’ long, 18-30” diameter. Northern MO. Cut fall of 2015 or 2016. Stored in a couple small stacks, all had sun exposure. Sawn into 1-1/4”*8” boards summer of 2018. Stickered and stacked along the wall in a uninsulated machine shed until summer of 2020. Boards were still 15-20% when we unstacked and attempted to use according to the high $ wood moisture tester the carpenters had.
Had very limited warp in these, and limited cracking even without ends painted, but was surprised at how wet they remained. I’d be doubtful of them drying down that much, that quickly based on what I saw.
 
Franny K

Franny K

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North eastern Ct USA
The relative humidity is low in the winter, if the 60 degree F air is warmed up low humidity air to begin with and exchanged on a regular basis I suspect good drying potential. It also depends on how long the pins on your moisture tester are. I got a moisture tester and there seems to be about a 10 or so % difference if I use the longer pins. Say 20 with the short ones and 30 with the longer ones that are a real chore to get in far enough. The manual shows other pins you pound in and wire up. I called he help line at the moisture tester and was told the results with the longer pins were more accurate. Also said the more expensive ones I did not get without pins were less accurate. Next time get the one capable of using the pound in pins. Kind of strange there is a card with two columns of tree types and set the meter depending on which species you have and then do a temperature correction. If you don't know this and someone sticks the meter in the wood and shows you a result, well it might be a bit misleading. Lots of folks don't read the manual.


The price is lower than what I would want to sell for and I do not think the moisture below 10% is realistic for air drying 4/4 or 1 1/16" in the 10 or so weeks. Maybe with some sort of programable kiln? Of course it does not say anything about knots which seem to distort oak lots in the drying.
 
Polish hammer

Polish hammer

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North east Wisconsin
Kind of my thoughts were if I could dry wet oak in a couple months why would I ever get any boards kiln dried or buy a kiln when for the cost of them I could build A shop n have an area dedicated to that plus a shop or even have a smaller insulated garage n dry in summer or keep heated when I need wood dried and have an area dedicated to that to an extent.. I mean I literally have pine boards in our family room right now stickered n stacked n figured it would be Months for them to dry enough to use inside and most logs didn’t even have bark on them when I sawed them and where from 19-22% off the mill maybe I’m wrong image.jpg
 
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