ArboristSite.com Sponsors
 
 


How do you get 1.5 cords into a half-ton pickup... (pics)

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by sleprac, Sep 10, 2013.

  1. HARRY BARKER

    HARRY BARKER ArboristSite Guru

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2008
    Messages:
    743
    Likes Received:
    118
    Location:
    western mass
    exactly.
     
  2. cantoo

    cantoo Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2002
    Messages:
    4,335
    Likes Received:
    10,253
    Location:
    North of Goderich, Ontario, Canada
  3. TreePointer

    TreePointer Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    Messages:
    3,961
    Likes Received:
    682
    Location:
    Western PA
    My quick-n-dirty estimate for pickup loads is that an 8' bed will hold 1/2 cord if ranked up to the top of the side walls and the gate is closed. 6' bed will be around 1/3 cord.
     
  4. Kevin in Ohio

    Kevin in Ohio Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2009
    Messages:
    1,713
    Likes Received:
    2,057
    Location:
    Ohio Stop Jawin' and start Sawin'
    It even works too! Always try to get at least a 1/3 of the length in the bed to save the stress on it. That truck has hauled a lot of weight over the years. We use Dad's truck more than mine but he hauls less as he always has a tool box in the bed.
     
  5. Kevin in Ohio

    Kevin in Ohio Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2009
    Messages:
    1,713
    Likes Received:
    2,057
    Location:
    Ohio Stop Jawin' and start Sawin'
    My expert stacking comes into play here:hmm3grin2orange: Seriously though, been lucky through the years as we are normally mound to the top of the cab. We're not real hilly around here so that helps as well. That is more than I normally haul but I was just moving it to the boiler house just on the other side of the truck. Right at a cord is the norm for me.
     
  6. it aint loaded till the bumper is dragging :laugh:
     
  7. Ash_403

    Ash_403 Shop smart. Shop S-Mart.

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2010
    Messages:
    257
    Likes Received:
    206
    Location:
    S central Indiana
    That is my experience also. Stack it tight, don't waste space.

    I don't like to overload my 1/2 ton ('95 Ford F150 4x4), but I drive it on public roads.
    Do what you want to do on your land if all you are doing is endangering yourself.... or breaking you own ####. :msp_thumbup:
     
  8. Big_Al

    Big_Al ArboristSite Guru

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2010
    Messages:
    719
    Likes Received:
    383
    Location:
    Chewelah, Wa
    Surprised I don't see any racks in any of the pics. Can stack more wood on and its easier to tell how how much wood you have. You'll have a square measurement, not such a big deal if you're hauling across the farm. Makes it easier if you're selling wood, most people will trust you but I've had some come out with tape measures.
     
  9. sleprac

    sleprac ArboristSite Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2010
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Shawangunks
    BWAAHHHHAHAHA! Nice setup ya got there Cantoo, but why'd ya reload the bucked rounds into another dump truck? No matter how small it is, if you get handlin' your wood too much, it really slows down production... :msp_tongue:

    Here's this morning's more conventional Tonka Tough load. Mostly black locust with a stick of cedar or two.

    View attachment 314094 View attachment 314095

    On a more serious note though, how do you guys prefer to move volume out of the woods: Splits, bucked rounds or log lengths? What works best to pack more wood into less space?
     
  10. Steve NW WI

    Steve NW WI Unwanted Riff Raff.

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2009
    Messages:
    7,880
    Likes Received:
    3,781
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    I prefer splits, not for hauling volume, but for handling it less. Drop and buck the tree, work along the length with the splitter, loading as you go, and stack it off the truck. Done.

    More handling=more work=less time to drink a cold one and brag about the work you just did.
     
  11. Wood Doctor

    Wood Doctor Edwin

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2008
    Messages:
    10,469
    Likes Received:
    6,266
    Location:
    Omaha, Nebraska
    I usually leave it in the round after cutting the rounds to length, usually 16" to 18". Then I haul the rounds to the splitter area. Most of the wood I cut has to be seasoned in the round for a couple of months anyway to make them easier to split. Towing the log splitter to the woods or the drop sites is usually not an option for me anyway.

    What I have to be careful of is lifting big rounds onto the tailgate. Usually I halve or quarter them down to size by noodle cutting. However, even then they can be troublesome because I'm not getting any younger or stronger. I keep forgetting that as the diameter of the round doubles, the weight quadruples.

    One thing for sure, if you split all the rounds that originally filled the truck to capacity, you will never get all of the split logs back into the truck. So, hauling the rounds rather than split firewood allows more wood to be packed on board initially.
     
  12. cantoo

    cantoo Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2002
    Messages:
    4,335
    Likes Received:
    10,253
    Location:
    North of Goderich, Ontario, Canada
    Sleprac, I must have been selling unsplit rounds and was delivering a load with the Tonka.
    I've done it all ways from cutting into rounds on the drop in the bush to piling up logs and hauling logs home to process. Right now I have a bunch of logs (tops) piled up in the middle of the bush so I've been cutting them into rounds, loading them on my truck and trailer and hauling them home about 20 miles. Then I put them right onto the splitter off the truck and trailer, the splits fall onto the conveyor and get piled high. This seems about the faster for me. I used to haul logs home, unload then cut into rounds, push into a pile and then lift off the ground onto the splitter. Seems to be lots of heavy lifting then.
     
  13. EXCALIBER

    EXCALIBER ArboristSite Guru

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2010
    Messages:
    648
    Likes Received:
    131
    Location:
    Western Nebraska
    Yeah but why is it sagging so bad, better get it some air bags stat! :msp_wink: Oh and hope you never need headlights as they would be shining up to the heavens! I figured the OP had to have air bags or beefed up springs because most all the fords made have the saggy ass problem too. Put 1000 lbs in back and you would swear the front end was coming off the ground in a ford. Just squishy.

    If you guys were smart and bought a Chevrolet you could easily haul two cords in back and never know it was there. I could feasibly fit 3-4 cords in back my half ton Chevy.
     
  14. Bushmans

    Bushmans Smoke Dragon Herder

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2011
    Messages:
    1,156
    Likes Received:
    518
    Location:
    Charlotte, Michigan
    my friend sent me this pic of 6 face cord on his 1/2 ton and trailer. I think he's nuts but he delivers this for $55 per face. He gets as much as possible on there to save gas money/trips. We tried telling him he is gonna kill someone some day but he doesn't listen. His delivery range is 25 miles.
    You can see the bed extender he built for his tailgate. 6 foot bed.


    [​IMG]
     
  15. svk

    svk A little bit of everything

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    21,725
    Likes Received:
    55,964
    Location:
    MN
    Nice set up. Although personally I would add another tier to the trailer walls and reduce the heap in the pickup.
     
  16. NDtreehugger

    NDtreehugger ArboristSite Guru

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2008
    Messages:
    580
    Likes Received:
    69
    Location:
    Minot North Dakota

    Looks like a cord and 1/2 to me.


    When my brother and I were yoooooounger we tried to put 1-1/2 cord on dads truck.

    When we were going down the road the front of the truck would bounce off the ground, we were laughing dancing around having a good ol time.

    When we got home Dad ran out of the house yelling get that #$%^$## off MY truck, with a few kicks and man size slaps some words we never heard we got it un-loaded in a hurry.

    That was the day were educated how load a Pick-up Truck Properly.

    For the rest of days I kept hearing you can put more on there then that
    Come on son don’t be a wooosy load it up.
     
  17. sb47

    sb47 Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2011
    Messages:
    4,108
    Likes Received:
    5,077
    Location:
    Texas
    Seems to me like there are a lot of people that don’t understand the meaning of load weight limits, not to mention the safety of others on the road.
    DOT can and will nail your ass with loads like these if caught on the road.
    Many of the loads and there given estimates are questionable as well.:smile2:
     
  18. Big_Al

    Big_Al ArboristSite Guru

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2010
    Messages:
    719
    Likes Received:
    383
    Location:
    Chewelah, Wa
    I can't speak for Texas but I know around here the dot or state patrol commercial enforcement folks won't look twice at a pickup load of wood going down the road. Our usual wood truck is an f350. The bed is 8' by 70"wide & has 50" tall racks. Filled up to top of racks that should be 1.5 cords. Wouldnt put that load on a half ton though.
     
  19. cantoo

    cantoo Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2002
    Messages:
    4,335
    Likes Received:
    10,253
    Location:
    North of Goderich, Ontario, Canada
    My licence is legal for the weight I haul in my truck, the trailer has dual axle brakes, I'm driving on gravel back roads because that's where I live except for 5 miles of pavement. Only traffic I usually meet is horse and buggies. And I'm sure not driving too fast or unsafe. Lots of the other guys are saying they are short hauling from bush to house etc. I have seen lots of overloaded trucks before though. The MTO around here started working round the clock including Saturdays and sundays, everybody trying to make money how ever they can.
     
  20. NDtreehugger

    NDtreehugger ArboristSite Guru

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2008
    Messages:
    580
    Likes Received:
    69
    Location:
    Minot North Dakota
    Same here but if its not secure they tag for unsecured load. Got to make sure its not going to fall off
    on a 2 lane HWY and find its way to the on coming traffic.
     

Share This Page