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How to make a log splitter??

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by Mr_Super-hunky, Jun 10, 2007.

  1. BlackOakTreeServ

    BlackOakTreeServ ArboristSite Guru

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    Dont use spring steel, its not the right stuff for using on a splitter!

    Just brake down the piggy bank and go buy some steel :laugh:

    And ya, Keep the pics coming!!!!!
     
  2. jason37756

    jason37756 ArboristSite Lurker

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    i've been a bit side tracked with a broken gearbox on a hay tedder... $150 for the tedder, $275 in parts... total investment $425 for a $1500 tedder. i'm feeling good about it.

    but back to the log splitter. i went ahead and cut, drilled, and got the brackets sized for the splitter, so i am gonna run with them and see what happens. i already have my wood gathered for the ole shaver furnace anyway (25 ricks) . i will design the brackets so that they take as little punishment as possible.

    i also wanted to share some info about kubota quick connects. i bought mine from here: for $20 each. consequently this is the company that provides kubota with their quick connects, so these are basically factory direct when compared to kubota pricing.

    kubota wanted $35 each. they fit mostly the newer models. mine is a 2007 3400s with the 463 loader. this is how i am powering the hydraulics for the splitter (for now anyway). i counted the speed and i do believe the total cycle was 40 seconds at 1200 rpm's for the 30" stroke cylinder. slow...

    pics attached
     
  3. jason37756

    jason37756 ArboristSite Lurker

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  4. Junkrunner

    Junkrunner ArboristSite Operative

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    NO!!! NO!!! NO!!!! Welding "spring-steel" ???? Not sayin you will, but you could get somebody hurt/killed.:dizzy:
     
  5. jason37756

    jason37756 ArboristSite Lurker

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    work in progress

    got some welding finished on the log splitter. i still have a bit to do. still need to clean the welds up with a hammer and a brush.

    enjoy.
     
  6. kbarnes12

    kbarnes12 ArboristSite Lurker

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    If it was me, I would raise the height so the top of the beam was a little bit below waist level. This will make for more comfortable splitting since you are not bent over all the time.

    Just my $0.02

    KB
     
  7. triptester

    triptester Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I see you are using a piece of rail for the beam you may want to test the welds before you get to far along. The steel used for rail can be very difficult to weld. It tends to be very hard and often brittle.
     
  8. boostnut

    boostnut ArboristSite Guru

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    Dont mean to be a prick but you're wasting your time man. Wrong material, bad layout (too short), push plate is waaaay too thin. Its an accident waiting to happen. Do you have any experience welding railroad track or spring steel? I'll put my foot in my mouth if you do but I'm guessing you're just trying to get by with a cheap build. Its not worth someone getting hurt.
     
    komatsuvarna likes this.
  9. jason37756

    jason37756 ArboristSite Lurker

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    finished and working

    i finished the splitter a few days ago and have split a little over a rick of walnut and very dry mulberry. That mulberry packs quite a punch when it finally gives under pressure.

    i did change the design on the push plate. i used a piece of 6" angle i had. this allowed me to reduce the number of pieces of metal and welds. it also made it look a bit better too. i did however like those two grabs on the original plate. it was actually a crosstie plate. i used half of another one to make the splitting wedge.

    i ended up with a 28" stroke and all of the wood that i split was 20"- 27" long.

    i did not have any problem with the welds cracking on the railroad metal. this particular track is kinda old. i am not sure when it was made, but it has been laying in the woods since 1971. they may have changed the dynamics of the metal since then... we actually used the track for a bridge until 1971, at that point we drug it into the woods to get it out of the way.

    i consider this splitter a hugh success for the $260 i have in it.

    pictures attached.

    enjoy.
     
  10. blades

    blades Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Can not see in pic if you have lips under the flange on the push plate, or if the cylinder is locked down. You might want to add a hold down on the front of the cylinder as a precautionary measure.
     

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