ArboristSite.com Sponsors
Traverse Creek Inc


Anti Vibration gloves

Walt41

Walt41

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Dec 4, 2009
Messages
6,076
Location
NY
Never tried it on a chainsaw but I have made some decent grip modifications to the handles of commercial mowers to reduce vibration transfer to operator in conditions where gloves are just not practical.
 
Philbert

Philbert

Chainsaw Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 25, 2006
Messages
18,118
Location
Minnesota
It is my experience after buying most every type of glove there is and using/testing them in logging as a cutter and with a cable skidder that these gloves are the best value if not the best glove period for logging and firewood related work, and unless some place new has shown up, the below link is the cheapest link for them.

As noted above, I like those gloves for general A/V use, but they have not held up well for me for handling firewood, etc. The soft rubber wears quickly and the knit backs snag frequently. They are OK for just saw work.

My favorites are the leather palmed versions of these: IMPACTO Ergonomic Personal Protection, Anti-vibration Glove, Impact Gloves, wrist supports, kneepads, insoles


Never tried it on a chainsaw but I have made some decent grip modifications to the handles of commercial mowers to reduce vibration transfer to operator in conditions where gloves are just not practical.

I have added foam, or rubber, or padded tape to mowers, snow throwers, bicycles, hand tools, etc. for years. Harder to do on a rear saw handle when you need to trigger it. That is the advantage of gloves.

You can wrap the upper handle as long as the diameter does not get too large to grip (depends on how big your hands are), just like pro tennis and golf players optimize the grips on their racquets or clubs.

Philbert
 
heimannm

heimannm

Tree Freak
Joined
Dec 28, 2005
Messages
10,623
Location
Dike, Iowa
It took 20 posts to get to the point, put something on those grips and you will do a lot more good that gloves. Others have mentioned some padded tape that cyclist use on the hand grips, I find a piece of heater hose slipped over the original metal handle adds both vibration protection for your hands, and a very nice grip.

Also, try to notice how you hold the saw, a lot of time we hold them with a GI Joe death grip when that is not really needed and the fatigue combined with the vibration really takes a toll.

Mark
 
cheeves

cheeves

Tree Freak
Joined
Aug 8, 2010
Messages
14,671
Location
Plymouth, Mass. America's Hometown
It took 20 posts to get to the point, put something on those grips and you will do a lot more good that gloves. Others have mentioned some padded tape that cyclist use on the hand grips, I find a piece of heater hose slipped over the original metal handle adds both vibration protection for your hands, and a very nice grip.

Also, try to notice how you hold the saw, a lot of time we hold them with a GI Joe death grip when that is not really needed and the fatigue combined with the vibration really takes a toll.

Mark
Excellent pt. Tape used for tennis rackets work good too. It's improved greatly over the years.
 
Philbert

Philbert

Chainsaw Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 25, 2006
Messages
18,118
Location
Minnesota
put something on those grips and you will do a lot more good that gloves.

Again, easier on the top bar than the rear handle with the trigger and throttle safety and/or lock.

Excellent pt. Tape used for tennis rackets work good too. It's improved greatly over the years.

One of my favorites is "3M™ Cold Shrink Tubing": link 3M or do a Google search.

It is a soft rubber hose originally made for insulating high voltage cables that is pre-expanded over a wound, plastic, spiral core. You slide it over the cable (or handle), and pull out the plastic strip, causing the hose to collapse and hold very tightly. Comes in different lengths and diameters, but Pricey. Very durable. The joke around the 3M plant that made this stuff was that none of the workers had a bare handled garden tool or leaky garden hose at home.

Philbert
 
Philbert

Philbert

Chainsaw Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 25, 2006
Messages
18,118
Location
Minnesota
Cold Shrink Image

Philbert

attachment.php
 
rallen

rallen

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
May 15, 2007
Messages
149
Location
Warrenton, VA (moved from Michigan!)
A different approach for the future...

This is probably not in the cards for now, but....

I have an 009L too, and I like using the little saw, but only use it for short periods of time for miscellaneous limbing and trimming. You might consider picking up a replacement starter cover and handle assembly from an 011av, or 011avt (if you want the top handle), if you are going to keep using this saw. There are lots of 011av's floating around used in various condition on ebay and Craigslist, and the cost of those parts to get a true AV set up for your 009 might be a better investment than the gloves. Just know that even with the avt it won't be quite as compact as your 009 setup.
 
hamish

hamish

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
May 1, 2010
Messages
3,468
Location
Ontario
As it had been stated the problem arises from prolonged use over many years when we thought it would never be an issue. Then we get older and the problems catch up with us. Reducing the vibration in the saw is the first line of defence. Most saws I see i the shop have never had the av mounts changed, most chains are sharpened in a manner to cause and introduce vibration to the operator.
To those that joke about the wearing of gloves/mitts when using a saw...........well your lil fingers won't last long at -30.

Doing ones best to prevent it is the key. I thought I had it figured out with a pair of m-pact gloves.........works on my right hand but not on my left..still trying new things out.
 
Top