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Horseradish

CentaurG2

CentaurG2

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Dec 27, 2008
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3,477
Location
New England
My grandfather grew it but he loved it. His plants are still growing. It is sort of an invasive weed and hard to get rid of. I often put it into my pickled beets but grandpa ate it straight up. He also loved raw garlic. He believed it cured everything.
 
sonny580

sonny580

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Jan 12, 2018
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173
Location
Illinois
After you dig the plants up and clean the roots, lightly peel or scrape the skin off and cut into small chunks then put them in a food processor and chop them fine. You can also grind them with a meat grinder, (done many gallons this way in my lifetime).
When using food processor Virginia does it like this:
1/2 to 2/3 cup sugar
1/2 cup vinegar
1/2 teaspoon of salt
then add the chunks and run thru 1 time. stop, take top off, scrape sides down, taste for the right taste to suit you, add more sugar, salt, vinegar if needed and grind again. stop scrape down sides and taste again and if ok go the 3'rd time running til fine grind stage.
We dont add water----some do. You can also add mayo if you was cream sauce or add whatever you like.
Put into glass jars to store in fridge, Will keep a year or more, but we grind enough for the winter then in spring before plants start to leaf out, dig more if needed to last til fall.
Neighbor made some and said he stores it in the freezer, and this would work too, never did it so dont know.
I dont have any problem with it spreading here since I have it in a row and till deep along side of the row.
I also am the the only one here that eats it! lol!!
 
djg james

djg james

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Feb 25, 2020
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421
Location
IL
.... then in spring before plants start to leaf out, dig more if needed......
I was wondering about that. The commercial field I pass everyday just plowed the field under and it looked like there were still plants in the field. Maybe not the quality they need so it's not worth the bother to harvest?
 
sonny580

sonny580

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Joined
Jan 12, 2018
Messages
173
Location
Illinois
never tried pressure canning it as it would probably loose flavor that way, --- but cant say for sure.
I think the demand for horseradish this year was down so bad that it really hurt the commercial producers since eateries were the main byers of it and they had to close so not enough other markets to turn to for selling it. ---- sad too!
 
sonny580

sonny580

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Joined
Jan 12, 2018
Messages
173
Location
Illinois
We can, freeze, and freeze-dry a lot of stuff from our gardens here. We like to have a 2 to 5 year supply on hand "just in case" ----- never know what's going to happen.
 
Stonesforbrains

Stonesforbrains

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Joined
Nov 19, 2018
Messages
237
Location
Lakeside hardwoods
After you dig the plants up and clean the roots, lightly peel or scrape the skin off and cut into small chunks then put them in a food processor and chop them fine. You can also grind them with a meat grinder, (done many gallons this way in my lifetime).
When using food processor Virginia does it like this:
1/2 to 2/3 cup sugar
1/2 cup vinegar
1/2 teaspoon of salt
then add the chunks and run thru 1 time. stop, take top off, scrape sides down, taste for the right taste to suit you, add more sugar, salt, vinegar if needed and grind again. stop scrape down sides and taste again and if ok go the 3'rd time running til fine grind stage.
We dont add water----some do. You can also add mayo if you was cream sauce or add whatever you like.
Put into glass jars to store in fridge, Will keep a year or more, but we grind enough for the winter then in spring before plants start to leaf out, dig more if needed to last til fall.
Neighbor made some and said he stores it in the freezer, and this would work too, never did it so dont know.
I dont have any problem with it spreading here since I have it in a row and till deep along side of the row.
I also am the the only one here that eats it! lol!!
I plan on growing some next year cause of your post, I love the stuff and had never thought about growing it. Saving your recipe, thank you!
 
sonny580

sonny580

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Joined
Jan 12, 2018
Messages
173
Location
Illinois
You can transplant them anytime of the year that the ground is not froze. --- I dig and move them all summer here---water them good til they get growing and they will be fine.
Freeze-drier here is the Harvest-right stainless steel 5 tray model , they come in several sizes but we found the 5-tray was best for us since we need a lot of capacity to do our harvest as quick as possible.
We got ours on a warehouse clearance sale and free shipping but still expensive but we use ours hard during garden season.
The main thing we do is onions and sweetcorn here. --- we do other stuff too and are testing more to see what works best.
 
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