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The mighty ash lives!

teacherman

teacherman

Sawturated
Joined
Feb 17, 2008
Messages
4,502
Location
New Hampshire
Howdy howdy. Long time since I've been on here. We just moved to New Hampshire, and our old farmstead has a pair of ash trees older than I by a long stretch. They are still alive, and the larger one is almost OK! 4.5 feet dbh. I'm too busy to post pics from my phone, but I'll get them up soon. The previous owner says he never treated them, and that gives me cause to believe they might be resistant to the ash borer, as I'd thought this species to be functionally extinct in these parts. I understand the state might partner with me in preserving this titan, which sits not thirty feet from our house. I am also posting this in the chainsaw forum, but as I did have a tree business for a couple of years, I suppose I can post here as well. Looking forward to climbing this one; it's a mighty one.

Thoughts? Suggestions? Ideas?
 
tree MDS

tree MDS

Daddy
Joined
May 8, 2007
Messages
9,591
Location
CT
Do either of them have one or two limbs that are clearly dead? That’s usually a sign that they’re infested and pretty much as good as gone. Sadly, some of the larger, more vigorous Ash take longer to succumb. At least that’s the way I’m seeing it. I could be wrong though. A bug and pest nerd might tell you different though.
 
teacherman

teacherman

Sawturated
Joined
Feb 17, 2008
Messages
4,502
Location
New Hampshire
Do either of them have one or two limbs that are clearly dead? That’s usually a sign that they’re infested and pretty much as good as gone. Sadly, some of the larger, more vigorous Ash take longer to succumb. At least that’s the way I’m seeing it. I could be wrong though. A bug and pest nerd might tell you different though.
Yeah, there is some dead on both of them, but the larger one has less of it. I have not seen a single D-shaped hole like what they told us to look for in tree school.
 
NIP Group
mikewhite85

mikewhite85

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Sep 3, 2009
Messages
651
Age
34
Location
Wellsboro, PA
Website
www.treemasterllc.com
Yeah, there is some dead on both of them, but the larger one has less of it. I have not seen a single D-shaped hole like what they told us to look for in tree school.
That's cool that they still seem to be doing moderately well.

You'll want to protect them. You could either be a do it yourselfer and use some mauget imicide capsules every year or hire out someone to inject with emamectin. Arborjet headquarters isn't too far from you. Triage protects for 2-3 years.
 
teacherman

teacherman

Sawturated
Joined
Feb 17, 2008
Messages
4,502
Location
New Hampshire
Thank you for the encouragement. I emailed the county forester a week ago, but haven't heard back. I'll try to call them this week. I suspect I'd have them treated, at least the first time. If both are less than a thousand to do, it's worth it to me. Can't replace a 200 year old tree, even one nearing the end of its time. There is some decay and conk activity, but the bigger one especially seems pretty vigorous yet. I'll keep you guys posted.
 

soloz2

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Jul 19, 2020
Messages
17
Age
30
Location
US
I hope they live! I'm taking down 80 ash from my property. Damn Ash borers. The grubs look nasty too when they come out after cutting or splitting the wood.
 
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