ArboristSite.com Sponsors
Traverse Creek Inc


22 Ton vs. 28 Ton Log Splitters

ebook

ebook

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Dec 9, 2008
Messages
9
Location
Iowa
I was wondering what the real world difference is between a 22 ton splitter and a 28 ton splitter. Specifically I'm look at this Brave splitter (22 ton) and this Speeco splitter (28 ton).

This will be my first splitter, so I don't have a lot of first hand knowledge to base my choice off of. They are both available locally, but the 22 ton is less expensive. I just wondered how much difference you would notice.

Thanks!
 
jerseydevil

jerseydevil

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Jun 17, 2005
Messages
248
Location
West Chester PA
I have a 33 ton white splitter. It's the only splitter I've ever owned, and the only splitter I've ran in the last 20 years. The only other time I ran a splitter was so long ago, I can't remember anything about it except it split wood. I use just about every bit of 33 tons in my day to day firewood useage. If you can afford a bigger stronger unit, I suggest you go for it. Compare obvious things like; engine size and quality; is it a honda, Briggs or a name youve never herard of. Is it convertable from horizontal to vertical? I do most of my splitting in horizontal position because its easier on my back, but its nice to know i can go vertical if needed. Is the wedge attached to the ram or does the ram push the log into a stationary wedge? I prefer a wedge attached to the ram as most like that can be converted to a four way wedge. Does either have a trailor hitch? Thhats important too. Quality of construction is very important too. These things should be built to last. All of this can effect price. In other words, A high quality 22 ton unit may cost as much as a 28 ton unit without the bells and whistles. Something to consider.
 
bowtechmadman

bowtechmadman

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Mar 30, 2007
Messages
3,150
Location
Big Rapids MI
I grew up using a 12ton horizontal, roper splitter, she's 30 yrs old and my Father is still splitting with it. It's had a couple motors, a hydro pump replaced and last year the ram welded. I used to be amazed at the size of wood we would split w/ it.
My own splitter is a 22ton horz/vert. and I haven't found anything I can't split. Some it's necessary to knock off pieces rather than split a huge round down the middle, but it hasn't left me wanting anything bigger.
 
ebook

ebook

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Dec 9, 2008
Messages
9
Location
Iowa
Thanks for the input. This will be my first splitter and I understand the sometimes theory that bigger is better, but the 22 ton looks like a decent unit so I wanted to hear about some real world experience. The 22 ton Brave model I'm looking at also comes with the log cradle/catch and the log dislodge thing at the piston. I would love to hear any more info ... especially at the Brave splitters in general.
 
Whitespider

Whitespider

Lost in the 50s
Joined
Nov 17, 2010
Messages
21,297
Location
On the Cedar in Northeast Iowa
Can’t say anything about the Brave line, never even seen one… But the difference in power between a 22 and 28-ton may not be that great depending on how the two manufactures calculate it, and round it off. Unless you’re planning on going into the firewood selling business, I would think a 22-ton would be more than enough splitter for the typical wood burning Joe. Really, if you learn to “read” the grain, even nasty crotches, a 15-ton will split near anything you ask of it. Keep in mind those tonnage numbers are usually calculated using the peak pressure just before the relief valve opens, only lasts for a couple milliseconds, and really isn’t applied long enough to do any real work. Still, the higher number probably does indicate more overall power… but the question is… Do you need it, and is it worth the extra weight and expense?

Personally, I have no use for a vertical splitter. A horizontal/vertical convertible just adds extra weight and (usually) requires longer hydraulic hoses. Besides, I don’t like the wedge mounted on the ram… seems completely back-azz-wards to me. If I was shopping for a new splitter, the ability to “go vertical” wouldn’t even be on my comparison list… and tonnage rating would be well to the bottom of the list. My top three priorities would be weight, size and cycle time… not necessarily in that order. I would want the lightest, smallest, fastest splitter (on balance) that I could find in my price range… most likely that would be a horizontal only, with a stationary wedge. And, because I’m not paying for the vertical option, log strippers, longer hoses, and whatnot, I’d likely get more tonnage, at less weight, for my dollar. I would pony-up the extra cash for auto-cycle though, ‘cause that would be the next priority on my list. Engine brand? Probably not a deal breaker… even the cheap Chinese engines are pretty reliable these days if maintained properly. Besides, engines are hot-swappable, and the knock-offs are down-right cheap.
 
hoosier daddy

hoosier daddy

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Jul 22, 2010
Messages
122
Location
NW Indiana
22 ton brave

I have a 22 ton brave and have had absolutely no issue with it...I do keep it up and change filter yearly and have changed the orig. fluid to Hy-tran (Case IH hyd fluid). As far as power it will split anything I can lift up to it...elm, black cherry, oak, ash and hedge mostly...it's the only splitter I have owned so I cannot dispell or discuss any other units. From my experience the brave 22 ton will most likely do what you need to do and all parts and filters are available through your local auto parts joints...My 2 cents...

HD
 
ijon1

ijon1

ArboristSite Member
Joined
May 19, 2011
Messages
93
Location
michigan
I had a 20 ton Brave splitter for 23 years. I had to replace a motor and a pump this year. Up until the pump went bad I split anything I put into it. They make a good splitter.
 
Last edited:
ebook

ebook

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Dec 9, 2008
Messages
9
Location
Iowa
Thanks for the information everyone. It looks like I may go with the Brave 22 ton splitter. Which in the long run is a good deal because it is sold at the place I work!
 
greendohn

greendohn

firewood hack
Joined
Sep 21, 2011
Messages
3,306
Location
s.e.indiana, close to the old slow and muddy
any one ever hear of a "robush" brand? i guess they were built years ago in southeastern indiana..it was bought new in 1982, had a 5hp briggs when i got it..engine was toast..of course i put a well used honda 5.5hp on 8-10 yrs ago and it refuses to let me down. (preventive maintenance is the key),,it's a horizontal only with big"pans" on either side of the rail so's ya' dont have to bend over an' keep pickin' yer wood up. the wedge is on the ram so's ya' can leave it on the the trailer hitch of yer truck and it dont push-drop the splits onto the ground like those with the wedge on the tongue.(the splits stay on the "pans" ) it is kinda' low to the ground, i leave it on the hitch or prop it up on a log or whatnot) if i've got monsters to split i can put the tongue-hitch on the ground and jest roll 'em up on and split. dont know the tonnage,,but it's rare that i find the piece it wont split. it's built on a heavy "I" beam but it's easy to move around in the woods by hand...i've used those big farm store models when helpin' a buddy here an' there. i've found the the horizontal mode pretty hi to lift big round onto, and the splits kept fallin off the rail so ya' got to bend over again and pick 'em up.. vertical splitting left me bent over at the waist tryin to wrestle a round layin' flat on the ground onto it..an' the 28 ton model we were using was a monster to move around in the woods..the big engine on it was very thirsty for fuel and LOUD!!(think it's a big briggs engine) any who,, i guess my point is bigger aint always better..
 
Woodomaker

Woodomaker

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Oct 7, 2011
Messages
149
Location
IL = crazy
I have rented a few in the past. I now own a 22 ton Brave splitter......it has not failed to split anything I have throwed at it.
The Briggs engine starts easy.
 
Ol' Brian

Ol' Brian

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Jun 4, 2009
Messages
518
Location
Southwestern Illinois
I've had my Brave 22 ton for 11 years now I think... It's split everything I've been able to bring to it... Oak, elm, sycamore, you name it.

IMHO, the "bigger" single wedge splitters (like the 34 ton "Tim the Toolman Taylor Specials") just get you to pay for performance you'll never use. If 22 tons will get it done, when will you ever use the extra 12 tons on a 34 ton model? Plus, they burn almost double the gas... to do the same work. It's all a waste.
 
Last edited:
avalancher

avalancher

Arboristsite Raconteur
Joined
Dec 7, 2007
Messages
4,316
Location
Newport TN
I've had my Brave 22 ton for 11 years now I think... It's split everything I've been able to bring to it... Oak, elm, sycamore, you name it.

IMHO, the "bigger" single wedge splitters (like the 34 ton "Tim the Toolman Taylor Specials") just get you to pay for performance you'll never use. If 22 tons will get it done, when will you ever use the extra 12 tons on a 34 ton model? Plus, they burn almost double the gas... to do the same work. It's all a waste.


You couldnt be further from the truth. There is little comparrison between a 22 ton model and say a 35 ton when it comes to getting a large volume of work done, but it also depends on what species of wood you are splitting and other variables.

I used to have a 27 ton, and recently sold it and purchased a new Speeco 35 ton and my splitting time has been cut by a third. Biggest reason is, the 35 ton rarely drops down into the low gear, generally speaking it just plows through in high gear.

And second, when using the 4way head, I rarely have to remove it for a tough piece. With the 27 ton model, I would often have to slip the 4 way head off when dealing with crotches and mangled pieces of hickory and pecan. Not anymore. I split three cords last weekend and never once took the 4 way head off for anything and all I split that day was hickory.

Every tool has its uses, and if most of your wood is small to medium sized and of a species that is easy to split, then a 22 ton model will suit you just fine. But if you are getting into large rounds, species that are hard to split, and want to use a 4 way head there is no replacement for power. It makes the job easier by not having to wrestle the rounds off and try another approach, and it certainly makes it faster if your splitter does not have to resort to the low gear to get through difficult pieces.

And as far as double the gas, I actually use less fuel than when I had the 27 ton model. Since I shaved a third of my splitting time off and the engine is working a heck of a lot less while working, my fuel consumption has gone down by almost two gallons a day.

Nope, a bigger splitter within reason is faster, easier, and in most cases more economical.
 

CWME

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Feb 25, 2010
Messages
994
Location
Gorham, Maine
I am running a 20 ton American splitter with a 4 way. I normally see zero PSI registering on the gauge for straight grain wood. Ocassionally I will see 4-500 PSI if a knot is in the wood. The only time I see higher pressures and "low gear" is when splitting crotches. I should say shearing crotches. Since I replaced my valve I have yet to find something that won't split or shear even with a 4 way.
For me I would stay with a 20-22 ton. Splitting oak, beech, birch, maple, hemlock, and pine.
 
Fifelaker

Fifelaker

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Sep 9, 2011
Messages
4,696
Location
Fife lake,Mi
A friend has the 22 ton speco and it has split every thing I have ever put on it and some of it was nasty oak crotches elm crotches iron wood. It may slow down but it still splits it.
 
ebook

ebook

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Dec 9, 2008
Messages
9
Location
Iowa
Thanks for all of the input. I ended up going with the 22 Ton splitter because in the end the price and the dealer (store where I purchased it) made the difference for me. But, I wouldn't have felt okay about it without the good advice here. I have been putting it through the paces for about a week now and I love it so far. It has split all the big knotty and crotch pieces I have thrown it's way and while it may not be as fast as some it didn't dent my pocket book as much either. One nice thing with the Brave though was it also had the log knocker installed and the cradle ... so it was a decent bonus. Plus, it was sold full of hydraulic fluid and the other one I was looking at would not have been.

Thanks again! I'm going to have to stick around the forums and keep learning!
 
fhafer

fhafer

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Messages
105
Location
Virginia
Log Splitters

I have three splitters; a Northern Tools 27 ton with a four-way wedge, a Rayco LS-2526 with two-way, four-way, and six-way wedges, and a Vermeer LS-200 that we call "Big Nasty".

Most wheels go through the Rayco machine at least once, the Northern machine does all the final splitting and it's never had a problem. I get all my wood for free from local tree companies so it's usually the stuff nobody wants. Most require cutting with my Stihl 064 and 36" bar/114DL.

The Vermeer gets to work on the bells and big knots.

I like my Honda powered splitters....it just a personal preference. What size are the rams? 4 inch or 5 inch? When in doubt go with the one with the best engine and biggest ram.

My opinions of course.
 
Last edited:
Quadrafire2

Quadrafire2

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Oct 23, 2007
Messages
169
Location
Long Island NY
log splitter

Two other things to consider when buying a log splitter,

1) The cycle time. Get the one with the faster cycle time.
2) The engine noise level. Get an engine that generates the least amount of noise, after operating for hours one could appreciate it, of course ALWAYS wear your hearing noise protection device.
 
Top