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Yes!! I brought a splitter home with me yesterday.

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by Kensterfly, Jul 9, 2011.

  1. Kensterfly

    Kensterfly ArboristSite Operative

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    After a day of anxiety, not hearing from the CL seller of the splitter I was trying to buy, she finally called me. I had already written the deal off, assuming that she caved in and sold to someone offering more money. But no, she was having a bad day at work and was running late. She emailed me just before 5:00 and actually gave me her phone number, so I figured that was a good sign. She said she would meet me at the designated place. I need at least two hours to get there so we set up a time of around 7:00. We arrived right on time. She called and said she was running late and would be there in about 45 minutes. My buddy was helping me with his trailer and our brides had decided to join us for the road trip. While we were waiting we went inside the nearby Tex-Mex place and had a great dinner and a margarita. About 8:00 I went outside and the seller was just arriving. She had the splitter in tow.

    It's a Huskee 35 ton. She listed it as "new" when it fact it was purchased seven years ago by her errant husband who soon ran off with another woman. It has been in storage since that time. There is no way this thing has ever "known" a round of wood. The wedge is downright virginal. There is not the slightest scuff, scratch or mark on the beam or the cylinder. The decals are all in place and unsullied. The oil looks like it just came out of the can. Not a hint of seepage in the hydraulic hoses or anywhere else in the system. The gas tank was bone dry with no sign that it has ever had any gasoline in there, which I was happy to see. Nothing like storing gasoline in a carb for seven years to really gum up the works.

    The thing was covered in dust, which I also took as a good sign, To me, it meant that the seller had not wiped it down to remove any oil leak marks, etc. The bottom end of the toe plate has some minor surface tarnish. I'll touch it up with fresh paint if i can find the right color. One of the plastic fenders is a little deformed. Probably from having something leaning against it the hot storage locker. Not a big deal.

    $1000 is what I paid for a never used 35 ton Huskee splitter. Now, I usually only hand split and burn a cord and a half, maybe two cords a year, so 35 tons may be overkill. A 22 ton Huskee was probably just right, but if I can get a 'new' 35 ton for the same price as 22 tons, why not? Besides, I have access to supplies that could probably yield 50 cords right now, all Water Oak, Post Oak, and some pignut Hickory. I 'spect I could sell a little on the side.

    I know I've probably posted too many threads in my search for a splitter. I won't start a new another new one, at least on the subject of buying one. Thanks for all the guidance and tips and support. And yes, it really did happen! See Below.

    [​IMG]
     
    D&B Mack, CharlieG, KD57 and 2 others like this.
  2. promac850

    promac850 formerly promac610

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    Fricking awesome!!!:rock:

    That baby looks fresh from TSC!! Can't ask for a better deal than that... well, free would've been the best, but you can't get everything for free...

    I wanna see a vid of that thing cracking an oak crotch in half... :blob2::rock:
     
  3. Nosmo

    Nosmo Addicted to ArboristSite

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    35 Ton Huskee

    Congratulations on your purchase. Once you begin using your new splitter you will be glad you have the 35 ton model. I know you are going to enjoy splitting rounds with it.

    You may want to consider making a work table to roll the split halves onto. The table will make it a lot easier to quarter up a piece by rolling it back onto the beam. Picking up a split half on the ground and setting it back up on the beam will begin to work on a person's back quickly.

    Congratulations again.
    Nosmo
     
  4. blacklocst

    blacklocst ArboristSite Guru

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    Congrats, I just bought a new/used splitter myself recently. I know exactly how you feel... like a kid on Christmas morning.
     
  5. Streblerm

    Streblerm Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Looks good. I wouldn't worry about the fenders. My friend's didn't make it through the first year. Unless you are towing it long distances, which I wouldn't, they are pretty useless IMHO. My 22 ton doesn't even have them.
     
  6. Toddppm

    Toddppm Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Nice splitter and great deal. Are you really planning on touching up the paint on the bottom of the toe plate?:msp_mellow:
     
  7. Kensterfly

    Kensterfly ArboristSite Operative

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    Nosmo, I am, indeed, going to rig up a home-made work table out of scrap wood. The store bought ones are really nice but I don't need to spend any more money at the moment and I have lots of scrap lumber around.
     
  8. Kensterfly

    Kensterfly ArboristSite Operative

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    Thought it might help prevent it from getting rusty if I put a good coat of paint on it.
     
  9. 046

    046 Tree Freak

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    congrats!!!!

    my 35 ton speeco has been dead reliable.
    it's never seen wood that it couldn't split
    shears the wood that doesn't give

    disadvantage has been the dog slow cycle times
    only split 4-5 cords per year, not a big deal

    be real careful towing at speed...
    hit a big bump and you could flip your splitter
     
  10. tmoto

    tmoto ArboristSite Lurker

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    35 ton huskee

    Looks like you got a hell of a deal. I have been following your threads and it seems your long journey to a log splitter is over. You won't be sorry I my self just purchased a 28 ton speeco, have split a couple loads of oak and it has done a very good job. The 35 ton should split anything you need to split. Congrats!!!!!!

    :cheers:
     
  11. ponyexpress976

    ponyexpress976 nipple fritters

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    Congrats and welcome to the hydraulic club! That tool will pay for itself in no time flat if you want to start selling wood. It will more than pay for itself in time now available for family, friends etc, not to mention sore arms, shoulders, back, legs from splitting wood the hard way. As mentioned earlier, be super careful when towing. They have a lot of weight up high and get pretty bouncy. If I have to go anywhere of more than a few miles, it goes on the trailer. Its a new toy and I know you want it to look good but the first time you tip it into the vertical, that fresh paint is coming right back off again.
     
  12. mga

    mga wandering

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    a score well done!

    you did good, man.

    enjoy your splitter.
     
  13. Nosmo

    Nosmo Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Wooden Work Table

    I built my work table in just a few minutes out of materials I had laying around. The table is a piece of 1/2" strandboard with two 2 x 4" along the edges. I bolted 2-pieces of flat iron to the side of the beam for the table to lay on with the 2 x 4's clamped to the flat irons.

    Works real well.

    Nosmo
     
  14. olyman

    olyman Tree Freak

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    :msp_biggrin::msp_biggrin: as per pm......................
     
  15. Kensterfly

    Kensterfly ArboristSite Operative

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    Nosmo, can you post pics of the table you built and how it is attached? Thanks!
     
  16. Kensterfly

    Kensterfly ArboristSite Operative

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    So, I got home from my quick trip to Dallas. Changed clothes. Went out and double checked the fluids. Oil is full and looks like it just came out of the can. The Hydro fluid is a clear as water and almost impossible to see on the dip stick. It was just above the bottom fill line. I put in maybe half a gallon of gas. I tightened all the hose clamps but not needed more than maybe half a turn. Didn’t see a primer like on our lawn mowers. Set the choke, opened the throttle. Fired up on the third pull. Remember that this splitter has been in storage for seven years since new and has never had a drop of gas in it.

    It has also been sitting for almost 48 hours since we pulled it home on a trailer, long enough for all the fluids to settle down.

    Okay, running smooth. I engaged the hydraulic lever. The wedge starts moving but sort of stuttering on the down stroke. Retract is very smooth.
    I gave it another down stroke, very smooth. A few up and down strokes follow. No more stutters. I shut it down and find that the fluid level has dropped. Not unexpected, of course. I had a gallon of universal so I added it. Still only halfway between the Fill zone marks.

    <———————Fill—————————>

    But I figure it is safe for now.

    After it warmed up the muffler started putting out a lot of smoke. I figure it was just burning off a film of oil. The smoke disappeared after a while of running.

    The only imperfection I see is that the plate on the tongue that the jack attaches to is bent in, rather than being perpendicular to the tongue beam, so the jack foot does not sit flush with the ground/ garage floor. It’s toes in quite a bit. You can see this in pic I posted. I tried to straighten it out with a hand sledge but that didn’t make a dent in it. This will prevent a good stable platform. How should I handle this? Take it to a welder and let him heat it up and bend it back into place?

    Other than that, it looks good to go! Hopefully, I’ll have time to get out to the stacks and give it a try out soon.
     
  17. Steve NW WI

    Steve NW WI Unwanted Riff Raff.

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    Nice splitter! I'm sure you'll love it.

    The stuttering on the first stroke was just purging the air out of the cylinder, that's where the oil went to. It should be good to go now unless you run it low on fluid and pump air back into it.

    The stand doesn't look to be badly bent, and since it'll likely be used on rough terrain anyway, I probably wouldn't worry about it. If you need it fixed to look "new", or if it does wobble a lot, anyone with a torch should be able to heat it up enough to straighten it.

    Enjoy!
     
  18. Nosmo

    Nosmo Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Work Table

    I'll charge up the batteries in my camera and take some photos today. Bear in mind it is nothing fancy but it does the job.

    Nosmo
     
  19. Nosmo

    Nosmo Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Work Table

    Here are the photos of my work table.

    Materials:
    2 pieces of 1/8" thick 1-3/4" wide flat iron about 16" long. Bend one end of each piece at a 90 degree angle at about 3" from the end. Drill a hole in each piece so you'll be able to bolt them to the beam. The holes are already provided in the beam.

    The table is a piece of 1/2" strandboard but you can use plywood if you wish. It is a rectangle cut 26" x 12-1/2". The notch in the right end on mine is 1-1/2" x 2-1/2" to allow the table to fit next to the back plate.

    The table supports are a pair of 2" x 4" each 8-1/2" long. The table will set right down on top of the flat irons with the 2" x 4"'s each inside of the irons. I use a pair of C clamps to clamp the 2" x 4"'s to the iron. I may get around to just bolting the table to the iron.

    Nosmo
     
  20. avalancher

    avalancher Arboristsite Raconteur

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    Well, congrats are in order Kensterfly! Im glad you held out for a quality piece of equipment instead of a POS like the one in the pawn shop. I am sure you will be happier in the long run not having to worry about it!
     

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