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Chinese saws

Huskybill

Huskybill

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No one wants to work, what’s next, the immigrants over the southern border most want to work, the ones I worked with are hard workers. Even the boat people from nam I worked with we gave them deburring grinders and they bought new firebirds soon after. Lol. Of course the first recession hit. When I was out of work I was willing to take any job that paid more than my unemployment check to extend my benefits longer. Sucks when you want to work and there’s no jobs.
 

J D

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Maybe there wouldn't be so much of a market for copies of the older saws if current saws were built to last & be serviceable the same way their predecessors were... Proprietary elements that lock you into dealer only servicing & engineered obsolessence would have me seriously second guessing dropping over a grand on a new saw... Especially if I can buy a copy of a well proven earlier model that any competent mechanic can work on for a fifth of the price. Granted it definitely won't last as long, BUT I can fix ANYTHING that goes wrong with it, & the parts are cheap & available.
I know the manufacturers have to adhere to environmental regulations etc, & I support that... but to me that means product lifespan & repairability also. & regardless, we should be able to fully maintain our own equipment at a reasonable cost.
All that aside, my preference is to buy quality used gear & repair it
 
Huskybill

Huskybill

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I didn’t use the 100 cc saws much with the smaller trees how often do you use a 100 cc saw, my 385 took care of my big ash trees, my 570/365 did the smaller tops. Still need the bigger saws for the big stuff, but how much does a home owner need or use a bigger saw? When I was in business I mainly ran the 2100’s. The 385 hasn’t run in a year since the last trees were taken down. Lately it’s been slow cutting on the property. I don’t have time to deal with equipment failures when I need them to run.
Parts for Chinese saws could be a problem?

There was a local logging crew that every cutter ran a 2100. Years ago.
 
Franny K

Franny K

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Decades ago on CNC machines I built only 2 axis controls were allowed out of our country. The 6 axis higher output controls didn’t leave the country.
That may be the way it was supposed to be. I am in your general area and remember a conversation with i believe it is a millwright who rigs and moves heavy stuff who did not understand why his job was sending such item to China.
 
Motherboard

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How long was it before japan to go from cheap plastic toy cars we grew up with to high tech stuff we see today? China is still on the bottom of the learning curve
I doubt China is on the bottom, Boing and companies like them seen to that, they soon learned
about china's contempt for others, when it was too late though.
As much as I hate to admit it, the USA would have a very difficult time kicking Chinese @$$ in a war. China owns most of the production of REE (rare earth elements) and the downstream high-tech industry that needs REE to function. Add to that the Chinese mining industry that produces much of the scarce elements that modern society (and the military) requires. China does a great job at stealing the technology developed by others and then copying it. As a civilization, they've been around for a loooooooong time, and they can be damn ruthless when they want. It doesn't pay to underestimate the Chi-Coms.

JQ
Completely agree, and that is exactly what everyone is doing, underestimating them, they make crap products because
it makes them a lot of money, make it again tomorrow type of thing, but they are capable of making very good ones,
its just not in their interest to do so, for one, it could be re engineered, wonder where they developed that fear, and two,
they do not export their quality items. Did any of you see the documentaries about production in china, the workers were
asked about the quality of the products they made, their answer was, its for export, we don;t care.
 
Motherboard

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Reading this makes me want to also bring up the failure of American manufacturing not mentioned. Greed/laziness by workers here. Unions got too strong and workers demanded too much for too little work. Forcing companies to turn elsewhere for business. Unfortunately it’s easy to just point the finger at China, but at least part of the blame remains here.
Is evidenced now buy the fact that many businesses in our country are suffering because people just refuse to go to work. I must drive by 30 help wanted signs a day on my commute, yet I have a number of friends just kicking rocks about how covid, or some other event, caused them to lose their job (but they won’t go work at these 30 jobs bc they think they’re overqualified or something) and just remain unemployed. Maybe late night ramblings…
It really is difficult to get workers who can think these days, they come like zombies, up late, drinking, drugs,
very high opinions about themselves and what they are not going to do, and the mobile phone addicts, they
ca not be employed at all, and there are substantial number of phone addicts. I took a boy fishing one day,
in the end I had to take the phone off him for his own safety, and that of the rod and reel I loaned him, we only
went one time and that was enough.
 
Huskybill

Huskybill

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The CNC machines are perfect who can’t think, just feed the parts and hit the go button.

We built 25 lathes for caterpillar tractor. All automated loader and unloaders no human on the floor train tracks connect the machines.
 
Motherboard

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They had no trucks capable of moving the 25 ton parts. It takes five or our trailer trucks to move the 200,000 lb machine(124” Chuck lathe)
They will do a lot of damage with what they can make with that lathe. Hope there was a remote destruct built in,
like they build in chips and mic 's to what they send out way.
 
Franny K

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This is the chainsaw section. We are getting diverted into what likely has military implications.

Why no clean air index tag, complies with emissions on the muffler? sticker with complies for such year mfg? This is not enforced, to the point the senix chainsaw saw sits on the shelf at a sort of big box place. Don't containers of these things get seized in other parts of the world?
 
ericm979

ericm979

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I've sworn off the Chinese Stihl clones. The last one I got was an assembled MS440 copy. They screwed up the o-rings on both the oil pump and the gas tank cap so it leaked gas and oil like crazy. The oil pump adjuster was nearly seized. With a replacement pump and o-rings it keeps its fluids in now. But it vibrates quite a lot. I think that is due to the heavier thick walled piston. These saws come without spark arrestor screens which are required here, so swapping mufflers is another additional expense.

The chinese bar and chains I ordered at the same time also have problems. The bar was slightly bent at the saw end (poor packaging) so I bent it back but I can't get it as straight as a good bar from the factory. The chains have a lot of friction in the bar when the tension is adjusted properly. The couple times I ran a full tank through it, the bar got pretty hot. The drivers measure about .051 vs an Archer chain's .050.

Chinese companies can make stuff as good as anywhere else. But there's also a lot that don't, because idiots like me will buy on price. I'm done with that.
 
Ronie

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I think it's all in what you expect out of one, if you buy one with the expectation of pulling it out of the box and having a reliable saw your going to be disappointed.
 
Gord404

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The only new saw I have taken down for a straight gassed Echo 590, kept simple, like the quality and have heard nothing but good about them, be kind of interesting to watch if the Japanese take the market after a while, good price, good quality for your $... check out their history in the early auto industry and how they got their foot in the door.
 
drumbum

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True, the manufacturers jumped ship, we had to follow or do without, lack of options forced us to,
but with Stihl in Germany, I.N.E in Italy, Cebora in Italy, I can get tools made in the EU.
I am disgruntled that manufacturers chased the dollar all the way to China, to increase profits,
in a world that is awake, profits would be only one variable instead of the main one.

I will still try to avoid the China purchases, and am sure after this pandemic manufacturers are re-thinking
their position, depending on people and resources that they only thought they had control over must be
addressed if our economies are not to suffer like they are.
wanna buy an L?
 
Ted Jenkins

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Maybe there wouldn't be so much of a market for copies of the older saws if current saws were built to last & be serviceable the same way their predecessors were... Proprietary elements that lock you into dealer only servicing & engineered obsolessence would have me seriously second guessing dropping over a grand on a new saw... Especially if I can buy a copy of a well proven earlier model that any competent mechanic can work on for a fifth of the price. Granted it definitely won't last as long, BUT I can fix ANYTHING that goes wrong with it, & the parts are cheap & available.
I know the manufacturers have to adhere to environmental regulations etc, & I support that... but to me that means product lifespan & repairability also. & regardless, we should be able to fully maintain our own equipment at a reasonable cost.
All that aside, my preference is to buy quality used gear & repair it
Very well stated. Very very few people will wear out any saw so why would some one spend extra for some thing that does not work as well. The newer saws do not in any way make the environment a cleaner safer place. If an OP has to travel once or twice in his large engine pickup to have a saw serviced during its life span that would destroy any environmental gain so why bother. I buy and use only saws that can have a carburetor changed in the field with out too much bother or I junk it. I like aftermarket saws that have good designs easy parts availability and inexpensive prices. Thanks
 
Motherboard

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Very well stated. Very very few people will wear out any saw so why would some one spend extra for some thing that does not work as well. The newer saws do not in any way make the environment a cleaner safer place. If an OP has to travel once or twice in his large engine pickup to have a saw serviced during its life span that would destroy any environmental gain so why bother. I buy and use only saws that can have a carburetor changed in the field with out too much bother or I junk it. I like aftermarket saws that have good designs easy parts availability and inexpensive prices. Thanks
We would all like aftermarket saws that have good design easy parts availability and are inexpensive,
but there is no such thing. Copy cats are not to be considered as they are taking advantage of the hard work of others,
they are frauds, damaging our economy in multiple ways.
 
Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

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We would all like aftermarket saws that have good design easy parts availability and are inexpensive,
but there is no such thing. Copy cats are not to be considered as they are taking advantage of the hard work of others,
they are frauds, damaging our economy in multiple ways.
Stihl and Husqvarna and others could make more parts and kits for older design saws but they choose not to. Americans as example could go to work and produce all kinds of things that are well made but choose not to. My economy is booming because at my age I still like to work and produce products that are of high quality. If more people did that then there would be a great lesson to be learned but then there is reality. Thanks
 
ammoaddict

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Some of these Chinese saws are not so good and some are pretty darn good. I built one of the 660 kits and had lots of trouble. Decomp blew apart. Inside of piston skirt not beveled enough and hit the counterweights. Had to shim the chain adjuster to get it to work. Fast idle didn't work, replaced with OEM and still doesn't work. Gas cap leaked, fuel line grommet leaked. It's a little hard to start but it runs very well.
I also built the Husqvarna 365/372 kit. I had to replace the decomp and the pull rope. Everything else is kit parts. This saw starts, runs and oils very well. I'm very happy with it.

Sent from my moto g(7) power using Tapatalk
 
Motherboard

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I think it's all in what you expect out of one, if you buy one with the expectation of pulling it out of the box and having a reliable saw your going to be disappointed.
People generally expect a working product, and to make anything less and sell it as such
is just taking a hand at people.
 
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